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The prodigal son is back!

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  • Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets
    Hi everyone! I m back from my holidays on the beautiful island of Corfu! Actually, I ve been back since last Monday, but I wanted to go through my e-mail
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 1, 2011
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      Hi everyone!

      I'm back from my holidays on the beautiful island of Corfu! Actually, I've
      been back since last Monday, but I wanted to go through my e-mail backlog
      first before I started becoming active again :) .

      I've spent wonderful holidays, although I can't say for sure I'm fully
      rested (this happens when you stay up every night till 2:00AM and still get
      out of bed early to enjoy the sun, although all the Retsina may have played
      a role too, not to mention the kumquat liqueur :P ).

      Linguistically speaking, my holidays were unremarkable. I did get to
      practise my Greek, thankfully, and got many compliments for my
      pronunciation. But I did notice that I still have difficulties following
      people when they speak Greek at normal speed. I need to practise more often.
      I guess I need to go to Greece more often then :) .

      Also, my husband and I have made friends there, and we are already thinking
      of going back! :)

      So, I'm back. What did I miss? :P
      --
      Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets.

      http://christophoronomicon.blogspot.com/
      http://www.christophoronomicon.nl/
    • Roger Mills
      ... not to mention the kumquat liqueur :P ). Kumquat liqueur, wha!!!!!!??? ... My experience with Spanish was the same. I think the native Span. professors in
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 1, 2011
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        --- On Fri, 7/1/11, Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets <tsela.cg@...> wrote:

        not to mention the kumquat liqueur :P ).

        Kumquat liqueur, wha!!!!!!???
        >
        > Linguistically speaking, my holidays were unremarkable. I
        > did get to
        > practise my Greek, thankfully, and got many compliments for
        > my
        > pronunciation. But I did notice that I still have
        > difficulties following
        > people when they speak Greek at normal speed.

        My experience with Spanish was the same. I think the native Span. professors in college slowed down a bit for us, but during my 3-month trip to S.America back in 1967, after the first 2-3 weeks (and hardly ever speaking English), my comprehension got a lot better. I'm sure the average Latinos down there weren't slowing down for the poor gringo. If you were able to spend several months in Greece (speaking minimal French/Engl./Dutch/whatever), I think you'd find your comprehension improving too.

        Admittedly now I'm rusty, but with Hispanics in the US I have trouble-- they talk much faster than S.Americans IME, and of course I'm not accustomed to Caribbean and Mexican dialects.
      • Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets
        ... Yes: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:KoumQuatLiqueur.jpg Kumquats were introduced on Corfu a long time ago, and they use them mainly to produce a special
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 2, 2011
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          On 2 July 2011 04:40, Roger Mills <romiltz@...> wrote:

          > --- On Fri, 7/1/11, Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets <tsela.cg@...>
          > wrote:
          >
          > not to mention the kumquat liqueur :P ).
          >
          > Kumquat liqueur, wha!!!!!!???
          >

          Yes: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:KoumQuatLiqueur.jpg

          Kumquats were introduced on Corfu a long time ago, and they use them mainly
          to produce a special sweet liqueur and cakes. I like it a lot :) . It's
          strong, but it doesn't give you a hangover when you wake up the next day :P
          .


          > >
          > > Linguistically speaking, my holidays were unremarkable. I
          > > did get to
          > > practise my Greek, thankfully, and got many compliments for
          > > my
          > > pronunciation. But I did notice that I still have
          > > difficulties following
          > > people when they speak Greek at normal speed.
          >
          > My experience with Spanish was the same. I think the native Span.
          > professors in college slowed down a bit for us, but during my 3-month trip
          > to S.America back in 1967, after the first 2-3 weeks (and hardly ever
          > speaking English), my comprehension got a lot better. I'm sure the average
          > Latinos down there weren't slowing down for the poor gringo. If you were
          > able to spend several months in Greece (speaking minimal
          > French/Engl./Dutch/whatever), I think you'd find your comprehension
          > improving too.
          >
          >
          True. I guess the fact that our hosts spoke Dutch as well as Greek (one is
          Greek, but was born in Antwerp and grew up in Flanders, and his wife is
          Dutch, but has been living for 30 years in Greece) didn't help :) .


          > Admittedly now I'm rusty, but with Hispanics in the US I have trouble--
          > they talk much faster than S.Americans IME, and of course I'm not accustomed
          > to Caribbean and Mexican dialects.
          >

          My main difficulty is remembering the vocabulary. I also still lack the
          instinct I have in Romance and Germanic languages to recognise related
          words.
          --
          Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets.

          http://christophoronomicon.blogspot.com/
          http://www.christophoronomicon.nl/
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