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Re: Shakespeare's way with language

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  • Roberto Suárez Soto
    2011/7/1 Daniel Bowman I like #1 just due to its cleverness. I m not sure why I like #2 so much. ... On the other hand, tickles me
    Message 1 of 15 , Jul 1, 2011
      2011/7/1 Daniel Bowman <danny.c.bowman@...>

      I like #1 just due to its cleverness. I'm not sure why I like #2 so much.
      > Perhaps it is a personal cellar door, but something about "behowl" tickles
      > me
      > pink, and I've been trying to work it into ordinary conversation (with some
      > difficulty).
      >

      On the other hand, "tickles me pink" is something I had never heard, and
      that I find very funny. I'll add it to my repertoire :-)

      --
      Roberto Suárez Soto
    • Adam Walker
      If you like that one, you should try tickles me pea green, which means the opposite. Adam
      Message 2 of 15 , Jul 1, 2011
        If you like that one, you should try tickles me pea green, which means
        the opposite. Adam

        On 7/1/11, Roberto Suárez Soto <talkingxouba@...> wrote:
        > 2011/7/1 Daniel Bowman <danny.c.bowman@...>
        >
        > I like #1 just due to its cleverness. I'm not sure why I like #2 so much.
        >> Perhaps it is a personal cellar door, but something about "behowl" tickles
        >> me
        >> pink, and I've been trying to work it into ordinary conversation (with
        >> some
        >> difficulty).
        >>
        >
        > On the other hand, "tickles me pink" is something I had never heard, and
        > that I find very funny. I'll add it to my repertoire :-)
        >
        > --
        > Roberto Suárez Soto
        >
      • Charlie
        ... Never heard that one. I would imagine that tickle pink comes from the fact that we may get flushed when tickled. But why pea green? Charlie
        Message 3 of 15 , Jul 1, 2011
          --- In conlang@yahoogroups.com, Adam Walker <carraxan@...> wrote:
          >
          > If you like that one, you should try tickles me pea green, which means
          > the opposite. Adam
          >
          Never heard that one. I would imagine that "tickle pink" comes from the fact that we may get flushed when tickled.

          But why pea green?

          Charlie
        • Adam Walker
          I haven t the foggiest. I ve heard it all my life. My maternal grandmother used it, as did my great aunts. My dad uses it. I have the feeling it is sort of
          Message 4 of 15 , Jul 1, 2011
            I haven't the foggiest. I've heard it all my life. My maternal grandmother
            used it, as did my great aunts. My dad uses it. I have the feeling it is
            sort of country, but I grew up in Dallas and never had anyone (who was a
            native speaker) fail to understand it or remark that they hadn't heard it
            before. Refresh my memory, what part of the US are you from? Maybe it's
            regional.

            Adam

            On Fri, Jul 1, 2011 at 9:18 AM, Charlie <caeruleancentaur@...> wrote:

            > --- In conlang@yahoogroups.com, Adam Walker <carraxan@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > If you like that one, you should try tickles me pea green, which means
            > > the opposite. Adam
            > >
            > Never heard that one. I would imagine that "tickle pink" comes from the
            > fact that we may get flushed when tickled.
            >
            > But why pea green?
            >
            > Charlie
            >
          • phil@PHILLIPDRISCOLL.COM
            When I was growing up in Michigan in the 1960s, I m tickled pink was a very common expression. However, I ve never heard any form of this with pea green.
            Message 5 of 15 , Jul 1, 2011
              When I was growing up in Michigan in the 1960s, "I'm tickled pink"
              was a very common expression. However, I've never heard any
              form of this with "pea green."

              --Ph. D.

              Adam Walker wrote:
              > I haven't the foggiest. I've heard it all my life. My maternal grandmother
              > used it, as did my great aunts. My dad uses it. I have the feeling it is
              > sort of country, but I grew up in Dallas and never had anyone (who was a
              > native speaker) fail to understand it or remark that they hadn't heard it
              > before. Refresh my memory, what part of the US are you from? Maybe it's
              > regional.
              >
              > Adam
              >
              > Charlie wrote:
              >
              > > ---  Adam Walker wrote:
              > > >
              > > > If you like that one, you should try tickles me pea green, which means
              > > > the opposite. Adam
              > > >
              > > Never heard that one. I would imagine that "tickle pink" comes from the
              > > fact that we may get flushed when tickled.
              > >
              > > But why pea green?
              > >
              > > Charlie
            • Adam Walker
              Well, a quick google using ticke and pea green turns up a number of usages in the wild, but many of them do seem to be linked to Texas. and strangely, non
              Message 6 of 15 , Jul 1, 2011
                Well, a quick google using ticke and "pea green" turns up a number of usages
                "in the wild," but many of them do seem to be linked to Texas. and
                strangely, non of them seem to have the ironic tone I am accustomed to. For
                me the phrase means "(highly) displeased," but most of the uses I found in
                my brief search seem to be exactly synonymous with "tickled pink." Ah well.


                Adam

                On Fri, Jul 1, 2011 at 10:30 AM, <phil@...> wrote:

                > When I was growing up in Michigan in the 1960s, "I'm tickled pink"
                > was a very common expression. However, I've never heard any
                > form of this with "pea green."
                >
                > --Ph. D.
                > Adam Walker wrote:
                >
                >> I haven't the foggiest. I've heard it all my life. My maternal
                >> grandmother
                >> used it, as did my great aunts. My dad uses it. I have the feeling it is
                >> sort of country, but I grew up in Dallas and never had anyone (who was a
                >> native speaker) fail to understand it or remark that they hadn't heard it
                >> before. Refresh my memory, what part of the US are you from? Maybe it's
                >> regional.
                >> Adam
                >>
                >> Charlie wrote:
                >>
                >>
                >> > --- Adam Walker wrote:
                >> > >
                >> > > If you like that one, you should try tickles me pea green, which means
                >> > > the opposite. Adam
                >> > >
                >> > Never heard that one. I would imagine that "tickle pink" comes from the
                >> > fact that we may get flushed when tickled. >
                >> > But why pea green?
                >> >
                >> > Charlie
                >>
                >
              • Samuel Stutter
                Could it have something to do with associating green with sickness and pink with joy? Tickled pink = this has stimulated my droll response = I m happy
                Message 7 of 15 , Jul 1, 2011
                  Could it have something to do with associating green with sickness and
                  pink with joy?

                  "Tickled pink" = this has stimulated my "droll" response = I'm happy

                  "Tickled green" = this has stimulated my "sick" response = I'm sick of
                  it = I'm bored

                  Maybe.

                  On 1 Jul 2011, at 16:30, <phil@...> wrote:

                  > When I was growing up in Michigan in the 1960s, "I'm tickled pink"
                  > was a very common expression. However, I've never heard any
                  > form of this with "pea green."
                  >
                  > --Ph. D.
                  > Adam Walker wrote:
                  >> I haven't the foggiest. I've heard it all my life. My maternal
                  >> grandmother
                  >> used it, as did my great aunts. My dad uses it. I have the
                  >> feeling it is
                  >> sort of country, but I grew up in Dallas and never had anyone (who
                  >> was a
                  >> native speaker) fail to understand it or remark that they hadn't
                  >> heard it
                  >> before. Refresh my memory, what part of the US are you from?
                  >> Maybe it's
                  >> regional.
                  >> Adam
                  >>
                  >> Charlie wrote:
                  >>
                  >> > --- Adam Walker wrote:
                  >> > >
                  >> > > If you like that one, you should try tickles me pea green,
                  >> which means
                  >> > > the opposite. Adam
                  >> > >
                  >> > Never heard that one. I would imagine that "tickle pink" comes
                  >> from the
                  >> > fact that we may get flushed when tickled. >
                  >> > But why pea green?
                  >> >
                  >> > Charlie
                • Roger Mills
                  ... I ve heard it, but long, long ago, from my mother and her friends in childhood.....(1940s)-- not recently.
                  Message 8 of 15 , Jul 1, 2011
                    --- On Fri, 7/1/11, Roberto Suárez Soto <talkingxouba@...> wrote:

                    > 2011/7/1 Daniel Bowman <danny.c.bowman@...>
                    >
                    > I like #1 just due to its cleverness.  I'm not sure
                    > why I like #2 so much.
                    > > Perhaps it is a personal cellar door, but something
                    > about "behowl" tickles
                    > > me
                    > > pink, and I've been trying to work it into ordinary
                    > conversation (with some
                    > > difficulty).
                    > >
                    >
                    >     On the other hand, "tickles me pink" is
                    > something I had never heard, and
                    > that I find very funny. I'll add it to my repertoire :-)
                    >
                    I've heard it, but long, long ago, from my mother and her friends in childhood.....(1940s)-- not recently.
                  • Roger Mills
                    ... Now that s a new one on me......
                    Message 9 of 15 , Jul 1, 2011
                      --- On Fri, 7/1/11, Adam Walker <carraxan@...> wrote:

                      > If you like that one, you should try
                      > tickles me pea green, which means
                      > the opposite. Adam
                      >
                      Now that's a new one on me......
                    • Padraic Brown
                      ... I wonder. I ve never heard it at all here in the northeast and seaboard regions. I ll have to try it out on a Texan and see what reaction is forthcoming...
                      Message 10 of 15 , Jul 1, 2011
                        --- On Fri, 7/1/11, Adam Walker <carraxan@...> wrote:

                        > I haven't the foggiest.  I've
                        > heard it all my life.  My maternal grandmother
                        > used it, as did my great aunts.  My dad uses it. 
                        > I have the feeling it is
                        > sort of country, but I grew up in Dallas and never had
                        > anyone (who was a
                        > native speaker) fail to understand it or remark that they
                        > hadn't heard it
                        > before.  Refresh my memory, what part of the US are
                        > you from?  Maybe it's regional.

                        I wonder. I've never heard it at all here in the northeast and seaboard
                        regions.

                        I'll have to try it out on a Texan and see what reaction is forthcoming...

                        Padraic

                        > Adam
                        >
                        > On Fri, Jul 1, 2011 at 9:18 AM, Charlie <caeruleancentaur@...>
                        > wrote:
                        >
                        > > --- In conlang@yahoogroups.com,
                        > Adam Walker <carraxan@...> wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > If you like that one, you should try tickles me
                        > pea green, which means
                        > > > the opposite. Adam
                        > > >
                        > > Never heard that one. I would imagine that "tickle
                        > pink" comes from the
                        > > fact that we may get flushed when tickled.
                        > >
                        > > But why pea green?
                        > >
                        > > Charlie
                        > >
                        >
                      • Larry Sulky
                        Never ever heard tickle me pea green . ... -- *Be regular and orderly in your life, so that you may be violent and original in your work.* -- Gustave Flaubert
                        Message 11 of 15 , Jul 1, 2011
                          Never ever heard "tickle me pea green".

                          On Fri, Jul 1, 2011 at 1:31 PM, Padraic Brown <elemtilas@...> wrote:

                          > --- On Fri, 7/1/11, Adam Walker <carraxan@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > > I haven't the foggiest. I've
                          > > heard it all my life. My maternal grandmother
                          > > used it, as did my great aunts. My dad uses it.
                          > > I have the feeling it is
                          > > sort of country, but I grew up in Dallas and never had
                          > > anyone (who was a
                          > > native speaker) fail to understand it or remark that they
                          > > hadn't heard it
                          > > before. Refresh my memory, what part of the US are
                          > > you from? Maybe it's regional.
                          >
                          > I wonder. I've never heard it at all here in the northeast and seaboard
                          > regions.
                          >
                          > I'll have to try it out on a Texan and see what reaction is forthcoming...
                          >
                          > Padraic
                          >
                          > > Adam
                          > >
                          > > On Fri, Jul 1, 2011 at 9:18 AM, Charlie <caeruleancentaur@...>
                          > > wrote:
                          > >
                          > > > --- In conlang@yahoogroups.com,
                          > > Adam Walker <carraxan@...> wrote:
                          > > > >
                          > > > > If you like that one, you should try tickles me
                          > > pea green, which means
                          > > > > the opposite. Adam
                          > > > >
                          > > > Never heard that one. I would imagine that "tickle
                          > > pink" comes from the
                          > > > fact that we may get flushed when tickled.
                          > > >
                          > > > But why pea green?
                          > > >
                          > > > Charlie
                          > > >
                          > >
                          >



                          --
                          *Be regular and orderly in your life, so that you may be violent and
                          original in your work.* -- Gustave Flaubert
                        • Daniel Bowman
                          In fact I thought tickle me pea green was a joke when I read it. People *actually* say that? Fascinating.
                          Message 12 of 15 , Jul 1, 2011
                            In fact I thought "tickle me pea green" was a joke when I read it. People
                            *actually* say that?

                            Fascinating.

                            On Fri, Jul 1, 2011 at 10:07 PM, Larry Sulky <larrysulky@...> wrote:

                            > Never ever heard "tickle me pea green".
                            >
                            > On Fri, Jul 1, 2011 at 1:31 PM, Padraic Brown <elemtilas@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > > --- On Fri, 7/1/11, Adam Walker <carraxan@...> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > > I haven't the foggiest. I've
                            > > > heard it all my life. My maternal grandmother
                            > > > used it, as did my great aunts. My dad uses it.
                            > > > I have the feeling it is
                            > > > sort of country, but I grew up in Dallas and never had
                            > > > anyone (who was a
                            > > > native speaker) fail to understand it or remark that they
                            > > > hadn't heard it
                            > > > before. Refresh my memory, what part of the US are
                            > > > you from? Maybe it's regional.
                            > >
                            > > I wonder. I've never heard it at all here in the northeast and seaboard
                            > > regions.
                            > >
                            > > I'll have to try it out on a Texan and see what reaction is
                            > forthcoming...
                            > >
                            > > Padraic
                            > >
                            > > > Adam
                            > > >
                            > > > On Fri, Jul 1, 2011 at 9:18 AM, Charlie <caeruleancentaur@...>
                            > > > wrote:
                            > > >
                            > > > > --- In conlang@yahoogroups.com,
                            > > > Adam Walker <carraxan@...> wrote:
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > If you like that one, you should try tickles me
                            > > > pea green, which means
                            > > > > > the opposite. Adam
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > Never heard that one. I would imagine that "tickle
                            > > > pink" comes from the
                            > > > > fact that we may get flushed when tickled.
                            > > > >
                            > > > > But why pea green?
                            > > > >
                            > > > > Charlie
                            > > > >
                            > > >
                            > >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > --
                            > *Be regular and orderly in your life, so that you may be violent and
                            > original in your work.* -- Gustave Flaubert
                            >
                          • MorphemeAddict
                            Tickled pink - yes. Tickled pea green - no. stevo - Indiana/Ohio i.a.
                            Message 13 of 15 , Jul 3, 2011
                              Tickled pink - yes.
                              Tickled pea green - no.

                              stevo - Indiana/Ohio i.a.

                              On Fri, Jul 1, 2011 at 11:25 AM, Adam Walker <carraxan@...> wrote:

                              > I haven't the foggiest. I've heard it all my life. My maternal
                              > grandmother
                              > used it, as did my great aunts. My dad uses it. I have the feeling it is
                              > sort of country, but I grew up in Dallas and never had anyone (who was a
                              > native speaker) fail to understand it or remark that they hadn't heard it
                              > before. Refresh my memory, what part of the US are you from? Maybe it's
                              > regional.
                              >
                              > Adam
                              >
                              > On Fri, Jul 1, 2011 at 9:18 AM, Charlie <caeruleancentaur@...>
                              > wrote:
                              >
                              > > --- In conlang@yahoogroups.com, Adam Walker <carraxan@...> wrote:
                              > > >
                              > > > If you like that one, you should try tickles me pea green, which means
                              > > > the opposite. Adam
                              > > >
                              > > Never heard that one. I would imagine that "tickle pink" comes from the
                              > > fact that we may get flushed when tickled.
                              > >
                              > > But why pea green?
                              > >
                              > > Charlie
                              > >
                              >
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