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Re: Special Color/Semantic Domain relationships -- was: Re: On Cultural Differences in Color

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  • Padraic Brown
    ... Numismatics also has its peculiarities of color terms, though perhaps not quite so weird as heraldry. Red is the deep copper color of a brand new bronze
    Message 1 of 22 , May 1, 2011
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      --- On Thu, 4/28/11, Adam Walker <carraxan@...> wrote:

      > Heralrdy is another field replete with weird color term not
      > used outside the field.

      Numismatics also has its peculiarities of color terms, though perhaps
      not quite so weird as heraldry. "Red" is the deep copper color of a brand
      new bronze or copper coin; "white" can describe the color of new silver or
      nickel based coins; "rainbow" is the phenomenon of chemical toning that
      affects coins stored in cloth bags for a long period of time.

      Jewelers also have their own color schemes, not only for metals but also
      for gems: red gold, white gold, etc; chocolate diamonds, etc.

      Padraic
    • Roman Rausch
      ... Apart from animals and beverages there are again eyes, and again in Russian: the word karij (apparently a Turkish/Tatar loan) is used for the colour of
      Message 2 of 22 , May 9, 2011
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        >But I was looking more for color words with very limited applications, i.e.
        >used only within certian specific semantic domains, rather than odd
        >applications of general color terms within certain semantic domains (which
        >is also quite interesting, but another topic IMO).

        Apart from animals and beverages there are again eyes, and again in Russian:
        the word karij (apparently a Turkish/Tatar loan) is used for the colour of
        brown eyes, the ordinary word being korichn'evyj (from koritsa 'cinnamon',
        itself from kora 'bark').
        Karij seems to have originated as a horse colour word, but don't ask me
        whether it's still actively used in this specific field. As far as common
        usage is concerned, it refers to eyes - but originally it was only a horse's
        eyes, I suspect.
      • Maxime Papillon
        ... Reminds me of such a specialized eye color word in French: pers , meaning greenish blue or blueish gree. It s so specialized that there isn t even an
        Message 3 of 22 , May 10, 2011
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          > Date: Mon, 9 May 2011 21:26:28 -0400
          > From: aranwe@...
          > Subject: Re: Special Color/Semantic Domain relationships -- was: Re: On Cultural Differences in Color
          > To: CONLANG@...
          >
          > >But I was looking more for color words with very limited applications, i.e.
          > >used only within certian specific semantic domains, rather than odd
          > >applications of general color terms within certain semantic domains (which
          > >is also quite interesting, but another topic IMO).
          >
          > Apart from animals and beverages there are again eyes, and again in Russian:
          > the word karij (apparently a Turkish/Tatar loan) is used for the colour of
          > brown eyes, the ordinary word being korichn'evyj (from koritsa 'cinnamon',
          > itself from kora 'bark').
          > Karij seems to have originated as a horse colour word, but don't ask me
          > whether it's still actively used in this specific field. As far as common
          > usage is concerned, it refers to eyes - but originally it was only a horse's
          > eyes, I suspect.

          Reminds me of such a specialized eye color word in French: "pers", meaning greenish blue or blueish gree. It's so specialized that there isn't even an official feminine form of the adjective, since "eye" is masculine.

          In any other context, to specify a color between blue and green, one would use "turquoise" or, more humbly, "bleu-vert", blue-green.
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