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Re: Licensing of Conlangs/Conworlds

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  • Kelvin Jackson
    So the feeling that I am getting is that there s no point in worrying about licensing conlangs/worlds... which makes my life a good deal easier, since I won t
    Message 1 of 33 , Jun 1, 2010
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      So the feeling that I am getting is that there's no point in worrying
      about licensing conlangs/worlds... which makes my life a good deal
      easier, since I won't have to worry about it. Thanks!

      -Kelvin

      ---------------------------------------------------------------
      Conlanging isn't a hobby—it's a way of life!

      On Jun 1, 2010, at 7:53 PM, Sai Emrys wrote:

      > On Tue, Jun 1, 2010 at 3:40 PM, Carsten Becker
      > <carbeck@...> wrote:
      >> In spite of this, as far
      >> as I remember, you won't stop being the legal creator of the Work
      >> though,
      >> even if you don't have control about its use anymore.
      >
      > At least in the US, this is incorrect. See
      > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Work_for_hire
      >
      > For such situations, the corporation is considered the legal creator
      > and owner outright. And indeed most situations will be considered work
      > for hire.
      >
      > It is also entirely possible, in the US, to fully sign over "moral
      > rights" such as the right to claim authorship even if one is
      > originally the legal creator (as is not the case in works for hire).
      > IIRC, in the EU, they are by contrast protected and unassignable. See
      > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moral_rights_%28copyright_law%29
      >
      > - Sai
    • Karen Badham
      ... This is pretty much how I feel too. If someone wants to contribute that has a decent handle on the stuff I ve done so far I ve found it helpful. I have no
      Message 33 of 33 , Jun 2, 2010
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        > I have had a few people write to me in Nevashi, and where they create new
        > words, I tend to adopt them immediately. I am grateful for any input I get,
        > and I've even gotten help steering the grammar and figuring out nuances that
        > I miss with only my one set of eyes looking at it.
        >
        > My conlangs tend to be linguistic toys above all, and then have a sort of
        > vague conculture as an afterthought. If I had more of an underlying plan or
        > philosophy behind them, I would probably be a little more reluctant to let
        > other people influence them (or, to be more specific to mess them up), but I
        > have found that having other people contribute is very valuable to me.
        >
        > Mia.
        >

        This is pretty much how I feel too. If someone wants to contribute that has
        a decent handle on the stuff I've done so far I've found it helpful. I have
        no grand goal that someone could "mess up" per say. Conlanging for me is a
        fun activity, and any easy way to get some artistic release with little
        expense, but my goals for conlanging mostly end there.

        -Karen Terry
        http://anti-moliminous.blogspot.com/
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