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Common morphemes in English

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  • Philip Newton
    Does someone know of a good list of common morphemes in English -- ideally, one sorted by frequency? It s moderately easy to find a list of common *words*
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 1, 2010
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      Does someone know of a good list of common morphemes in English --
      ideally, one sorted by frequency?

      It's moderately easy to find a list of common *words* ranked by
      frequency, but my searches for common prefixes and suffixes typically
      turn up vocabulary-buildings sites presenting Latin and Greek suffixes
      to use to increase your passive vocabulary, without much indication of
      frequency in common texts. Also, I expect that some of the most common
      affixes are neither Latin nor Greek (see, for example, -s -ing -ed
      -ly) and so would not turn up there.

      Cheers,
      Philip
      --
      Philip Newton <philip.newton@...>
    • Matthew Boutilier
      dear philip, are you looking for a list of exclusively *de*pendent morphemes - what you call ... - or the most common english morphemes in general? they are
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 1, 2010
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        dear philip,

        are you looking for a list of exclusively *de*pendent morphemes - what you
        call

        > prefixes and suffixes
        >
        - or the most common english morphemes in general? they are rather
        different. in the latter list you'll find much overlapping with the most
        common english words.

        matt

        On Tue, Jun 1, 2010 at 3:15 AM, Philip Newton <philip.newton@...>wrote:

        > Does someone know of a good list of common morphemes in English --
        > ideally, one sorted by frequency?
        >
        > It's moderately easy to find a list of common *words* ranked by
        > frequency, but my searches for common prefixes and suffixes typically
        > turn up vocabulary-buildings sites presenting Latin and Greek suffixes
        > to use to increase your passive vocabulary, without much indication of
        > frequency in common texts. Also, I expect that some of the most common
        > affixes are neither Latin nor Greek (see, for example, -s -ing -ed
        > -ly) and so would not turn up there.
        >
        > Cheers,
        > Philip
        > --
        > Philip Newton <philip.newton@...>
        >
      • Philip Newton
        ... The most common English morphemes in general. Or, perhaps, the most common surface realisations of morphemes and/or morpheme combinations (I m not sure
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 2, 2010
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          On Wed, Jun 2, 2010 at 07:33, Matthew Boutilier <mboutili@...> wrote:
          > dear philip,
          >
          > are you looking for a list of exclusively *de*pendent morphemes - what you
          > call
          >
          >> prefixes and suffixes
          >>
          > - or the most common english morphemes in general?  they are rather
          > different.  in the latter list you'll find much overlapping with the most
          > common english words.

          The most common English morphemes in general.

          Or, perhaps, the most common surface realisations of morphemes and/or
          morpheme combinations (I'm not sure what to call it); for example, if
          "is" is considered a combination of the morpheme "be" and the morpheme
          "<third person present singular indicative>", or "men" is considered a
          combination of the morpheme "man" and the morpheme "<plural>"
          (//-z//?), that's not as useful for my purpose; I would rather have a
          list that contains "is" and "men" separately.

          One other problem with lists of most common English words is that many
          of them are lists of most common English *lexemes*, so they only list,
          say, "be" but not "am, is, are, was, were", let along "being".

          (I'd also be interested in common affixes that may or may not be
          separate morphemes, like "ge-" in German -- I'm not sure whether that
          would be considered a morpheme or not, but it's certainly fairly
          common.)

          Cheers,
          Philip
          --
          Philip Newton <philip.newton@...>
        • Garth Wallace
          ... I don t think any analysis would say there was a morpheme be present in is . Lexical item, sure...
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 2, 2010
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            On Wed, Jun 2, 2010 at 3:42 AM, Philip Newton <philip.newton@...> wrote:
            > On Wed, Jun 2, 2010 at 07:33, Matthew Boutilier <mboutili@...> wrote:
            >> dear philip,
            >>
            >> are you looking for a list of exclusively *de*pendent morphemes - what you
            >> call
            >>
            >>> prefixes and suffixes
            >>>
            >> - or the most common english morphemes in general?  they are rather
            >> different.  in the latter list you'll find much overlapping with the most
            >> common english words.
            >
            > The most common English morphemes in general.
            >
            > Or, perhaps, the most common surface realisations of morphemes and/or
            > morpheme combinations (I'm not sure what to call it); for example, if
            > "is" is considered a combination of the morpheme "be" and the morpheme
            > "<third person present singular indicative>",

            I don't think any analysis would say there was a morpheme "be" present
            in "is". Lexical item, sure...
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