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Re: How long did people live in bygone times?

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  • Paul Schleitwiler, FCM
    What you want is historical adult mortality rates . Here is a l;ink to a Google search on that:
    Message 1 of 8 , Apr 1, 2009
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      What you want is 'historical adult mortality rates'.
      Here is a l;ink to a Google search on that:
      http://www.google.com/search?q=%27historical+adult+mortality+rates%27&btnG=Search&hl=en&sa=2
      However, such population data was not recorded until relatively recent
      times. So it depends on your definition of 'old times'.
      But people had an expectation that a man's life span, post childhood, would
      be 'four score and ten' or ninety years. Anyone who survived childhood
      probably was hardy enough to live long.
      God bless you always, all ways,
      Paul


      On Wed, Apr 1, 2009 at 1:42 PM, Benct Philip Jonsson <bpj@...> wrote:

      > Does anyone know anywhere I can find data on how long people could expect
      > to live in old times once they had managed to reach adulthood -- i.e.
      > basically life expectancy with infant mortality deduced.
      >
      > /BP
      >
    • Sai Emrys
      Also one of WP s references is good: http://www.soc.upenn.edu/courses/2003/spring/soc621_iliana/readings/kapl00d.pdf Not across-the-ages but does give detailed
      Message 2 of 8 , Apr 1, 2009
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        Also one of WP's references is good:

        http://www.soc.upenn.edu/courses/2003/spring/soc621_iliana/readings/kapl00d.pdf

        Not across-the-ages but does give detailed info & graphs of mortality
        over lifetime. They use 15 as the cutoff age - mortality to 15 and
        life expectancy once reaching 15.

        - Sai
      • Eric Christopherson
        ... I believe what you mean is threescore years and ten (which is from the Bible).
        Message 3 of 8 , Apr 1, 2009
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          On Apr 1, 2009, at 2:02 PM, Paul Schleitwiler, FCM wrote:
          > But people had an expectation that a man's life span, post
          > childhood, would
          > be 'four score and ten' or ninety years.

          I believe what you mean is "threescore years and ten" (which is from
          the Bible).
        • Alex Fink
          On Wed, 1 Apr 2009 14:02:57 -0500, Paul Schleitwiler, FCM ... Apologies that I m beside the point, but I love how that line and the subject impeccably scan...
          Message 4 of 8 , Apr 1, 2009
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            On Wed, 1 Apr 2009 14:02:57 -0500, Paul Schleitwiler, FCM
            <pjschleitwilerfcm@...> wrote:

            >What you want is 'historical adult mortality rates'.

            Apologies that I'm beside the point,
            but I love how that line and the subject impeccably scan...

            Alex
          • Paul Schleitwiler, FCM
            You are correct. Confusion with the Gettysburg Address probably. Thank you for pointing it out. God bless you always, all ways, Paul
            Message 5 of 8 , Apr 2, 2009
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              You are correct. Confusion with the Gettysburg Address probably. Thank you
              for pointing it out.
              God bless you always, all ways,
              Paul

              On Wed, Apr 1, 2009 at 10:18 PM, Eric Christopherson <rakko@...>wrote:

              > On Apr 1, 2009, at 2:02 PM, Paul Schleitwiler, FCM wrote:
              >
              >> But people had an expectation that a man's life span, post childhood,
              >> would
              >> be 'four score and ten' or ninety years.
              >>
              >
              > I believe what you mean is "threescore years and ten" (which is from the
              > Bible).
              >
            • David McCann
              ... I have the percentages for different age groups in 18th century Peru; not quite what you asked, but it gives you an idea: 0-9: 24% 10-19: 20% 20-29: 17%
              Message 6 of 8 , Apr 2, 2009
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                On Wed, 2009-04-01 at 20:42 +0200, Benct Philip Jonsson wrote:

                > Does anyone know anywhere I can find data on how long people
                > could expect to live in old times once they had managed to
                > reach adulthood -- i.e. basically life expectancy with
                > infant mortality deduced.

                I have the percentages for different age groups in 18th century Peru;
                not quite what you asked, but it gives you an idea:

                0-9: 24%
                10-19: 20%
                20-29: 17%
                30-39: 15%
                40-49: 11%
                50-59: 7%
                60-69: 4%
                70+: 2%

                Actuaries have tables of life expectancy at various ages, and these were
                first calculated by Edmond Halley. His paper on the topic for the Royal
                Society is available at

                http://www.pierre-marteau.com/editions/1693-mortality.html
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