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Re: Gweydr and English Lax Vowels

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  • Ph.D.
    ... This would have been about second grade, age seven, so we probably would have been dealing with monosyllabic words. I think the rule for longer words was
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 1 10:48 PM
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      Philip Newton wrote:
      >
      > Ph.D. wrote:
      >>
      >> I recall being taught this in elementary school.
      >> The rule was that if the word ended in a silent
      >> "e", drop the "e" and add "ed" or "ing". If the
      >> word ended in a consonant, double it, then
      >> add "ed" or "ing".
      >
      > Presumably you only learned that for monosyllabic
      > words?
      >
      > Because for longer words, the rule works in the
      > UK (travel ->travelled, travelling) but not in the
      > US (travel -> traveled, traveling) unless the final
      > vowel is stressed (permit -> permitted, permitting).


      This would have been about second grade, age
      seven, so we probably would have been dealing
      with monosyllabic words. I think the rule for
      longer words was just picked up through reading.

      --Ph. D.
    • Chris Wright
      ... Or wasn t learned. I m in the US, and I use travelling .
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 2 6:53 AM
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        2009/3/2 Ph.D. <phil@...>:
        > Philip Newton wrote:
        >>
        >> Ph.D. wrote:
        >>>
        >>> I recall being taught this in elementary school. The rule was that if the
        >>> word ended in a silent "e", drop the "e" and add "ed" or "ing". If the word
        >>> ended in a consonant, double it, then add "ed" or "ing".
        >>
        >> Presumably you only learned that for monosyllabic words?
        >>
        >> Because for longer words, the rule works in the UK (travel ->travelled,
        >> travelling) but not in the US (travel -> traveled, traveling) unless the
        >> final vowel is stressed (permit -> permitted, permitting).
        >
        >
        > This would have been about second grade, age seven, so we probably would
        > have been dealing with monosyllabic words. I think the rule for longer words
        > was just picked up through reading.

        Or wasn't learned. I'm in the US, and I use 'travelling'.
      • Paul Kershaw
        ... I think I must have just learned short vowels are followed by double consonants or something like that, because I think travelling looks right and
        Message 3 of 9 , Mar 2 6:59 AM
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          ----- Original Message ----
          > From: Philip Newton <philip.newton@...>
          >
          > 2009/3/2 Ph.D. :
          > > I recall being taught this in elementary school. The rule was that if the word
          > ended in a silent "e", drop the "e" and add "ed" or "ing". If the word
          > > ended in a consonant, double it, then add "ed"
          > > or "ing".
          >
          > Presumably you only learned that for monosyllabic words?

          I think I must have just learned "short vowels are followed by double consonants" or something like that, because I think "travelling" looks right and "traveling" looks wrong (even though MS Word looks at my US passport and tells me I'm wrong :) ).

          But PhD's supposition sounds about right: I learned it early enough that we wouldn't really have been dealing with many two-syllable words, so they may have left notions like "in stressed syllables" out.

          -- Paul
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