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A POA question

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  • Campbell Nilsen
    I find that if the tongue is placed between the upper lip and the upper teeth, one can produce nasals and plosives as in a regular place of articulation.
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 3, 2009
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      I find that if the tongue is placed between the upper lip and the upper teeth, one can produce nasals and plosives as in a regular place of articulation. Still working on fricatives, but does any natlang/auxlang use this POA? And what's its name?
       
      "Define 'cynical'."-M. Mudd
    • Eugene Oh
      It s normally called a lisp. :-) Eugene ... -- Eugene
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 3, 2009
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        It's normally called a lisp. :-)
        Eugene

        On Sat, Jan 3, 2009 at 6:06 PM, Campbell Nilsen <cactus95@...>wrote:

        > I find that if the tongue is placed between the upper lip and the upper
        > teeth, one can produce nasals and plosives as in a regular place of
        > articulation. Still working on fricatives, but does any natlang/auxlang
        > use this POA? And what's its name?
        >
        > "Define 'cynical'."-M. Mudd
        >



        --
        Eugene
      • caeruleancentaur
        ... Do you really mean between the upper lip and the upper teeth? How far up between them do you shove your tongue? I get a terrible sound when I do that.
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 3, 2009
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          > Campbell Nilsen <cactus95@...> wrote:
          >
          > I find that if the tongue is placed between the upper lip and the
          > upper teeth, one can produce nasals and plosives as in a regular
          > place of articulation. Still working on fricatives, but does any
          > natlang/auxlang use this POA? And what's its name?

          Do you really mean "between the upper lip and the upper teeth? How far
          up between them do you shove your tongue? I get a terrible sound when
          I do that. Perhaps you mean "under" the upper lip and the upper teeth.
          That's where I put my tongue when imitating a lisp.

          Charlie
        • Matthew Turnbull
          I ve never seen one (a language using it), and though I can differentiate the plosive from p and t i can t tell the difference between the nasal and m. It s
          Message 4 of 5 , Jan 3, 2009
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            I've never seen one (a language using it), and though I can
            differentiate the plosive from p and t i can't tell the difference
            between the nasal and m. It's not very difficult to do though.

            The place i'm putting my tongue is where you would put it to lick your
            upper teeth, between the teeth and the lip.

            It's not to hard to do a trill at that POA, and I find the trill very
            distinctive.
          • Ollock Ackeop
            If you mean putting the tip of the tongue tip actually up into that space, I don t know of any languages that do that. It seems to me a little difficult to do
            Message 5 of 5 , Jan 4, 2009
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              If you mean putting the tip of the tongue tip actually up into that space, I
              don't know of any languages that do that. It seems to me a little difficult to
              do most sounds there -- you almost have to make a full closure.

              There are, however, linguolabials, where the tongue is articulated against the
              upper lip (on the surface of it, rather than behind it). As far as I know, that's
              the only way natlangs articulate the tongue and lips -- since the lower lip can't
              be used with the tongue to block any kind of airway.
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