Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: "Russian lawn"

Expand Messages
  • MorphemeAddict@WMCONNECT.COM
    In a message dated 6/1/2008 16:03:55 PM Central Daylight Time, ... I agree that it s an interesting idea. Your description matches the vocabulary of Classical
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 1, 2008
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      In a message dated 6/1/2008 16:03:55 PM Central Daylight Time,
      dirk.elzinga@... writes:


      > As I recall from Mark's discussion of the idea when he was on this list, a
      > "Russian Lawn" is a large, grassy field without any paved walkways. People
      > traversing the lawn will eventually wear paths in the grass, which can then
      > be paved over. The paved walkways are thus established according to the
      > natural habits of the pedestrians who traverse the field.
      >
      > The analogy to grammar was to have a language without any derivational
      > machinery; all concepts (I believe he used WordNet) are mapped to roots of
      > roughly equal size without any systematic attempt to relate one idea with
      > another. The roots that are used more frequently are retained, while the
      > less frequently used forms are eventually dropped and replaced with forms
      > derived from the frequent items. In this way, the language should reflect
      > the natural habits of its users, much like the pathways of the Russian Lawn
      > reflect the natural habits of pedestrians.
      >
      > I have always thought it to be an interesting idea.
      >
      > Dirk
      >

      I agree that it's an interesting idea.
      Your description matches the vocabulary of Classical Yiklamu pretty well.
      When I was going to the University of Arizona in Tucson, there was a new bank
      near campus that had no sidewalks to the main door. There were only unpaved
      paths, apparently a 'Russian lawn'.

      stevo </HTML>
    • Ph. D.
      ... Back around 1970, they built a new university here in Michigan. They didn t put in any sidewalks. After the first year, they could tell by the size of the
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 2, 2008
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        stevo </HTML> wrote:
        >
        > Your description matches the vocabulary of
        > Classical Yiklamu pretty well. When I was
        > going to the University of Arizona in Tucson,
        > there was a new bank near campus that had
        > no sidewalks to the main door. There were
        > only unpaved paths, apparently a 'Russian lawn'.


        Back around 1970, they built a new university
        here in Michigan. They didn't put in any sidewalks.
        After the first year, they could tell by the size of
        the dirt paths where to put in sidewalks and what
        size to make them.

        --Ph. D.
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.