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Re: Your dictionary online?

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  • Carsten Becker
    Hi, On Sat, 29 Sep 2007 20:22:58 +0100, Michael Poxon ... That s what I have done, too. The frontend still needs some work, though, as it ll only show Ayeri -
    Message 1 of 9 , Oct 1, 2007
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      Hi,

      On Sat, 29 Sep 2007 20:22:58 +0100, Michael Poxon
      <mike@...> wrote:

      >Ah... I was thinking of simply doing the whole thing myself, storing the
      >dictionary as MySQL tables and querying it through php code on a web page.
      >Mike.

      That's what I have done, too. The frontend still needs some work, though, as
      it'll only show Ayeri -> English so far. Also, a planned feature yet to come is a
      vocabulary trainer like Henrik's alphabet trainer.

      Regards
      Carsten
    • Mark J. Reed
      DICT is a protocol, like HTTP, FTP, SMTP, NNTP, LDAP, yada yada yada. dict.org is the home page for the group responsible for developing the protocol. In
      Message 2 of 9 , Oct 1, 2007
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        DICT is a protocol, like HTTP, FTP, SMTP, NNTP, LDAP, yada yada yada.
        dict.org is the home page for the group responsible for developing the
        protocol.

        In particular, dict is for allowing dictionary data to be exchanged
        between software systems. It's designed to be used by other programs,
        not by end users. This allows the creation of many sorts of tools,
        such as rollup pages that let you query multiple dictionaries at once
        (see: dictionary.com). Basically, you stick a dict server in front of
        your database, and you get a query system customized for dictionary
        data that is safe to expose to the world (unlike SQL, which is so
        general you daren't expose it; see: SQL injection) and there are lots
        of tools that will know how to talk to your dictionary and do data
        analysis and such automatically.

        Even if you go the dict route, there's nothing to keep you from
        writing your own custom front-end web interface (in Java or PHP or
        Ruby or Python or Perl or ...) to do what you like with the data. You
        could have the web app use the same raw data source as the dict
        server, or you could have the web app go through the dict server,
        which would be looser coupling and therefore more resilient in the
        face of future change. (In terms of MVC patterns, the model class
        representing the dictionary would be an Active Resource instead of an
        Active Record if the app talks to the dict server instead of a
        database.)
      • li_sasxsek@NUTTER.NET
        ... yada. ... the ... programs, ... tools, ... once ... of ... lots ... I know this thread is a bit old, but I had an idea a while back for an XML-based
        Message 3 of 9 , Oct 13, 2007
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          > [mailto:CONLANG@...] On Behalf Of Mark J. Reed

          > DICT is a protocol, like HTTP, FTP, SMTP, NNTP, LDAP, yada yada
          yada.
          > dict.org is the home page for the group responsible for developing
          the
          > protocol.
          >
          > In particular, dict is for allowing dictionary data to be exchanged
          > between software systems. It's designed to be used by other
          programs,
          > not by end users. This allows the creation of many sorts of
          tools,
          > such as rollup pages that let you query multiple dictionaries at
          once
          > (see: dictionary.com). Basically, you stick a dict server in front
          of
          > your database, and you get a query system customized for dictionary
          > data that is safe to expose to the world (unlike SQL, which is so
          > general you daren't expose it; see: SQL injection) and there are
          lots
          > of tools that will know how to talk to your dictionary and do data
          > analysis and such automatically.
          > ...

          I know this thread is a bit old, but I had an idea a while back for an
          XML-based dictionary. I believe that others have already done work in
          this area, so if someone could steer me that direction, I'd appreciate
          it. I got as far as trying to create a style sheet to format the XML.
          I like the idea of using XML because it allows a bit more flexibility
          that just creating a flat database full of memo fields.
        • Arthaey Angosii
          ... I have an XML Schema (XSD) defined for my dictionary (which is finally online again!), plus XSLT files to convert the XML dictionary file into the
          Message 4 of 9 , Oct 14, 2007
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            Emaelivpeith li_sasxsek@... <li_sasxsek@...>:
            > I know this thread is a bit old, but I had an idea a while back for an
            > XML-based dictionary. I believe that others have already done work in
            > this area, so if someone could steer me that direction, I'd appreciate
            > it. I got as far as trying to create a style sheet to format the XML.
            > I like the idea of using XML because it allows a bit more flexibility
            > that just creating a flat database full of memo fields.

            I have an XML Schema (XSD) defined for my dictionary (which is finally
            online again!), plus XSLT files to convert the XML dictionary file
            into the formatted HTML that I display on my site.

            You can check them out at:

            http://www.arthaey.com/conlang/lexicon/dictionary.html
            http://www.arthaey.com/conlang/lexicon/dictionary.xml
            http://www.arthaey.com/conlang/lexicon/dictionary.xsd
            http://www.arthaey.com/conlang/lexicon/dictionary.xsl

            I also have some Perl to convert from Shoebox's .lex format to XML,
            but you probably aren't interested in that code. :)


            --
            AA
          • Arthaey Angosii
            ... Now that you mention TEI, I remember coming across it before I decided to define my own XML schema. I don t remember *why* I chose to do that, though... I
            Message 5 of 9 , Oct 14, 2007
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              On 10/14/07, taliesin the storyteller <taliesin-conlang@...> wrote:
              > Freedict uses a subset of the TEI dictionary format, which is
              > XML. There are ready-made tools for further processing for
              > TEI-marked up files.

              Now that you mention TEI, I remember coming across it before I decided
              to define my own XML schema. I don't remember *why* I chose to do
              that, though... I must have had a Good Reason (TM) at the time. :)

              > I don't use their format as I use
              > shoebox/toolbox and their format seems too simple to easily
              > convert from shoebox/toolbox to their format.

              I have a Perl script to convert Shoebox to XML; I could modify the
              script to output TEI instead my custom XML schema, if you're
              interested?


              --
              AA
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