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Re: Graeca sine flexione

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  • Paul Bennett
    On Thu, 03 May 2007 18:26:35 -0400, Henrik Theiling ... Yes. I have vaccilated over doing something similar with the Cyrillic form of
    Message 1 of 73 , May 3, 2007
      On Thu, 03 May 2007 18:26:35 -0400, Henrik Theiling <theiling@...>
      wrote:

      > OTOH, some other characters let you have more choice: you could have
      > three distinct Ls, since the corresponding characters look different
      > in all three alphabets.

      Yes. I have vaccilated over doing something similar with the Cyrillic form
      of Terzemian: having Рр for /4/ and Rʀ for /r\/.

      Right now, all the orthographies other than Modern Latin are lagging way
      behind my ongoing developments to the phonology. See
      http://wiki.frath.net/Terzemian for the current phonology (now with added
      Caucasus!) and the Modern Latin orthography, in comparison with the
      nathistorically old Cyrillic, UTA and Arabic script forms.

      > (I need to make a conlang that has /S/ in order to use Cyrillic 'sha'.)

      >> I mixed Greek, Coptic and Hebrew characters in Western-branch
      >> Thagojian v3
      >
      > Ah, interesting. How did Coptic fit in visually? Do you have
      > samples?

      I "cheated" by using the Coptic characters bundled with the Greek block in
      Unicode, which are typographically pretty close to the remainder of that
      block in most (all?) fonts I've seen. I had to bear a certain amount of
      font-size wrangling with the Hebrew characters, especially to provide
      distinct upper and lower case forms.

      It was essentially the Greek alphabet with s (descended from ϝ) for /u/, ζ
      for /ts/, צ for /K/ ע for /N/, י for /@/, ϩ for /h/, ϧ for /?/ and ϣ for
      /S/.

      The alphabet was (I may be misremembering a bit):
      α β γ δ ε s ζ η θ ι י κ λ צ μ ν ע ξ ο π ρ ϲ ϣ τ υ φ χ ψ ω ϩ ϧ
      /A b g d e u ts E T i @ k l K m n N ks o p r\ s t i\ f x ps O h ?/

      The letters s, ι, and υ also stood for /w/, /j/ and /M\/ when marked with
      "a diacritic". The rule was that just about any clear and consistent mark
      (being the only diacritic in the language) could be used depending on the
      individual scribe, but in my notes I mostly used a breve.

      >> a whole mixed bag
      >> for Terzemian (Eastern-branch Thagojian v3) -- one Latin script using
      >> relatively pure Latin-1 (plus l-slash and a few dots 'n' squiggles),
      >
      > I love 'x diaeresis' (although I never used it). I *love* diaereses,
      > anyway. Is it because I'm German? But I love acutes, too. Is it
      > because I live so close to France (only 6km)?? :-P

      I do not diaeresize in Terzemian (aside from vowels), as you will see at
      the link above. The Modern Latin form uses hacek (general-purpose
      flanger), dot-above/below (mostly for backing, but also a bit
      general-purpose), curved-apostrophe (glottalization), and ring
      (labialization).

      You may be pleased to note that I did once have a stub of a lang with ẅ
      for /H/, though.



      Paul



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    • Andreas Johansson
      ... Native names usually have meanings in my conlangs. However, only for Tairezazh have I created more than a mere handful; typical Tairezan names include
      Message 73 of 73 , May 17, 2007
        Quoting caeruleancentaur <caeruleancentaur@...>:

        >Benct Philip Jonsson <conlang@...> wrote:
        >
        >So how do people render names in their conlangs? Do names have
        >meaning in your conlangs or not?

        Native names usually have meanings in my conlangs. However, only for Tairezazh
        have I created more than a mere handful; typical Tairezan names include
        _Sashtsa_ "Red One", _Telko_ "Shorty", _Fkaz_ "Breeze".

        Foreign names are typically adapted. "America" would probably become _Mérika_
        ['me:rIka], since pretonic vowels tend to fall, and Sweden may become _Sferie_
        or _Zverie_, from Sw. _Sverige_ /svErjE/.

        Meghean too tends to assimilate names. _America_ [a'merika] is a possible
        Meghean word, and Sverige may become _Soerhe_, pronounced [swere] or [swerje]
        depending on how much furrin' f'neticks you feel like employing. Or perhaps
        _Soerea_ [swerja]; the Swedish final vowel is lower than Meghean /e/, and this
        form allows the glide to remain without violating Meghean phonotactics.

        Andreas
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