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Re: Graeca sine flexione

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  • Henrik Theiling
    Hi! ... I had the same feeling, too. It was quite confusing to read uranos in Greek GSF because the ou is replaced by simple y . In the same way, to
    Message 1 of 73 , May 3, 2007
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      Hi!

      Paul Bennett writes:
      > On Thu, 03 May 2007 10:41:40 -0400, Henrik Theiling
      > <theiling@...> wrote:
      >
      > > Hi!
      > >
      > > Philip Newton writes:
      > >> ...
      > >> Have a look at the introduction at http://gsf.wunschzetel.de/intro and
      > >> the sitemap at http://gsf.wunschzetel.de/sitemap and browse some of
      > >> the pages from there (the ones towards the beginning tend to have more
      > >> content).
      >
      > > Very nice! Will need more time to devour everything, though.
      >
      > I could not agree more, on both counts. The orthography makes my brain
      > hurt a little bit, but I'm sure I'll get used to it.

      I had the same feeling, too. It was quite confusing to read 'uranos'
      in Greek GSF because the 'ou' is replaced by simple 'y'. In the same
      way, 'to onoma sy' looks strange. So this conlang includes a spelling
      reform for modern Greek. :-)

      Although for something called 'X sine flexione' I would probably have
      used Old rather than Modern language as a basis but that is just
      personal preference. Philip's new conlang is really fun!

      E.g. I liked the careful selection of analytical forms.
      'hagiasthĂȘto' ~ 'as ajasi' is very nicely crafted. What is Modern
      Greek for this?

      > > What's funny is that it seems in the era of Unicode and nice fonts
      > > that have uniform faces for Latin, Greek, and Cyrillic, conlangers
      > > start to use mixed orthographies. I like this a lot
      >
      > Indeed. I'd even go so far as to recommend it where appropriate for
      > added realism and/or spice.

      Yes! And it leads to the need for strange decisions sometimes: due to
      the (unfortunate, from the conlangers view) coincidence of capital
      letters where the small letters are different, it is sometimes hard to
      decide from which alphabet to use some character. Examples are:

      - Greek nu, where the capital coincides with Latin N
      - Greek mu, where the capital coincides with Latin M
      - Greek eta, where the capital coincides with Latin H
      - Greek gamma, where the capital coincides with Cyrillic g
      ...

      Most of the Greek lower case chars that fall into this category are
      really nice, I think (e.g. mu and eta), so I felt is was a pity that
      the capitals coincide with Latin.

      OTOH, some other characters let you have more choice: you could have
      three distinct Ls, since the corresponding characters look different
      in all three alphabets.

      (I need to make a conlang that has /S/ in order to use Cyrillic 'sha'.)

      > I mixed Greek, Coptic and Hebrew characters in Western-branch
      > Thagojian v3

      Ah, interesting. How did Coptic fit in visually? Do you have
      samples?

      > (currently without a real name) and a whole mixed bag
      > for Terzemian (Eastern-branch Thagojian v3) -- one Latin script using
      > relatively pure Latin-1 (plus l-slash and a few dots 'n' squiggles),

      I love 'x diaeresis' (although I never used it). I *love* diaereses,
      anyway. Is it because I'm German? But I love acutes, too. Is it
      because I live so close to France (only 6km)?? :-P

      **Henrik
    • Andreas Johansson
      ... Native names usually have meanings in my conlangs. However, only for Tairezazh have I created more than a mere handful; typical Tairezan names include
      Message 73 of 73 , May 17, 2007
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        Quoting caeruleancentaur <caeruleancentaur@...>:

        >Benct Philip Jonsson <conlang@...> wrote:
        >
        >So how do people render names in their conlangs? Do names have
        >meaning in your conlangs or not?

        Native names usually have meanings in my conlangs. However, only for Tairezazh
        have I created more than a mere handful; typical Tairezan names include
        _Sashtsa_ "Red One", _Telko_ "Shorty", _Fkaz_ "Breeze".

        Foreign names are typically adapted. "America" would probably become _MĂ©rika_
        ['me:rIka], since pretonic vowels tend to fall, and Sweden may become _Sferie_
        or _Zverie_, from Sw. _Sverige_ /svErjE/.

        Meghean too tends to assimilate names. _America_ [a'merika] is a possible
        Meghean word, and Sverige may become _Soerhe_, pronounced [swere] or [swerje]
        depending on how much furrin' f'neticks you feel like employing. Or perhaps
        _Soerea_ [swerja]; the Swedish final vowel is lower than Meghean /e/, and this
        form allows the glide to remain without violating Meghean phonotactics.

        Andreas
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