Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Breehah horp

Expand Messages
  • Isaac Penzev
    ... I downloaded the previous version of the page to my hard disc for analysis, ... transliteration? ... You misunderstood me. To use *Latin* glyphs is ok,
    Message 1 of 12 , Mar 1, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Dave Rutan wrote:


      > Try here:
      > http://koplushia.tripod.com/Alliance/Breehah/breehah.html
      >
      > I was house cleaning with the website and decided to rename the file.
      > It's nice to know people are looking though!

      I downloaded the previous version of the page to my hard disc for analysis,
      so the change of address was not a problem, but still the question remains:

      > Isaac Penzev wrote:
      > > - What are the reasons for using English letter values in
      transliteration?
      >
      > Basicaly for ease of machinability. We did develop an alphabet, but
      > it's really only intended for use in drawings (my friend is a good
      > artist when he wants to be...)

      You misunderstood me. To use *Latin* glyphs is ok, many people do this. I
      wondered why the glyphs were assigned English *phonetic values*?! That is,
      why _AI_ means [ei], _UI_ [ju:], _U_ [V] etc.?

      -- Yitz
    • Dave Rutan
      ... It s the only way I know to do it. I m a native English speaker and an Esperantist. Breehah was created about 25 years ago when I was in school. I dusted
      Message 2 of 12 , Mar 1, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Isaac Penzev wrote:

        > You misunderstood me. To use *Latin* glyphs is ok, many people do this. I
        > wondered why the glyphs were assigned English *phonetic values*?! That is,
        > why _AI_ means [ei], _UI_ [ju:], _U_ [V] etc.?

        It's the only way I know to do it. I'm a native English speaker and an
        Esperantist. Breehah was created about 25 years ago when I was in
        school. I dusted it off last month and decided to develop it a bit.

        I'd be willing to learn a better way to do things.

        Dave
        --
        Al Dio ja fidu, sed senfare ne sidu.
      • Eric Christopherson
        ... You can do it however you want to do it. One thing to remember is that since English dialects differ so much, it can be kind of ambiguous or confusing to
        Message 3 of 12 , Mar 1, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          On Mar 1, 2007, at 7:26 AM, Dave Rutan wrote:

          > Isaac Penzev wrote:
          >
          >> You misunderstood me. To use *Latin* glyphs is ok, many people do
          >> this. I
          >> wondered why the glyphs were assigned English *phonetic values*?!
          >> That is,
          >> why _AI_ means [ei], _UI_ [ju:], _U_ [V] etc.?
          >
          > It's the only way I know to do it. I'm a native English speaker
          > and an Esperantist. Breehah was created about 25 years ago when I
          > was in school. I dusted it off last month and decided to develop
          > it a bit.
          >
          > I'd be willing to learn a better way to do things.

          You can do it however you want to do it. One thing to remember is
          that since English dialects differ so much, it can be kind of
          ambiguous or confusing to give pronunciations based on English words.
          E.g. you say <ui> is like in <suit>, which for me is /u/, an 'oo'
          without a 'y' in front -- whereas for some people (apparently
          including Isaac), it is /ju/, or a 'yoo' sound.
        • Dave Rutan
          ... Truly I tell you. I would easily forgive anyone mispronouncing breehah in my presence and I m sure the breehah would simply call it hi horjaik kahpuid
          Message 4 of 12 , Mar 1, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            Eric Christopherson wrote:
            > On Mar 1, 2007, at 7:26 AM, Dave Rutan wrote:
            >
            >> Isaac Penzev wrote:
            >>
            >>> You misunderstood me. To use *Latin* glyphs is ok, many people do
            >>> this. I
            >>> wondered why the glyphs were assigned English *phonetic values*?!
            >>> That is,
            >>> why _AI_ means [ei], _UI_ [ju:], _U_ [V] etc.?
            >>
            >> It's the only way I know to do it. I'm a native English speaker and
            >> an Esperantist. Breehah was created about 25 years ago when I was in
            >> school. I dusted it off last month and decided to develop it a bit.
            >>
            >> I'd be willing to learn a better way to do things.
            >
            > You can do it however you want to do it. One thing to remember is that
            > since English dialects differ so much, it can be kind of ambiguous or
            > confusing to give pronunciations based on English words. E.g. you say
            > <ui> is like in <suit>, which for me is /u/, an 'oo' without a 'y' in
            > front -- whereas for some people (apparently including Isaac), it is
            > /ju/, or a 'yoo' sound.

            Truly I tell you. I would easily forgive anyone mispronouncing breehah
            in my presence and I'm sure the breehah would simply call it hi'horjaik
            kahpuid 'that human dialect.' ;-)

            Dave
            --
            Mi diras la veron. Mi ne mensogas. (1a Timoteo 1:7b)
          • Isaac Penzev
            ... Indeed, I didn t want to sounds critical. I wondered for explanations from the conhistory viewpoint. ... You gonna laugh, but I pronounce _suit_ as [sY:t]
            Message 5 of 12 , Mar 2, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              Eric Christopherson wrote:


              > You can do it however you want to do it.

              Indeed, I didn't want to sounds critical. I wondered for explanations from
              the conhistory viewpoint.

              > One thing to remember is
              > that since English dialects differ so much, it can be kind of
              > ambiguous or confusing to give pronunciations based on English words.
              > E.g. you say <ui> is like in <suit>, which for me is /u/, an 'oo'
              > without a 'y' in front -- whereas for some people (apparently
              > including Isaac), it is /ju/, or a 'yoo' sound.

              You gonna laugh, but I pronounce _suit_ as [sY:t] :))

              -- Yitz
            • Dave Rutan
              ... Would fruit be a better choice? Dave -- Mi diras la veron. Mi ne mensogas. (1a Timoteo 1:7b)
              Message 6 of 12 , Mar 2, 2007
              • 0 Attachment
                Isaac Penzev wrote:
                > Eric Christopherson wrote:
                >
                >
                >> You can do it however you want to do it.
                >
                > Indeed, I didn't want to sounds critical. I wondered for explanations from
                > the conhistory viewpoint.
                >
                >> One thing to remember is
                >> that since English dialects differ so much, it can be kind of
                >> ambiguous or confusing to give pronunciations based on English words.
                >> E.g. you say <ui> is like in <suit>, which for me is /u/, an 'oo'
                >> without a 'y' in front -- whereas for some people (apparently
                >> including Isaac), it is /ju/, or a 'yoo' sound.
                >
                > You gonna laugh, but I pronounce _suit_ as [sY:t] :))

                Would 'fruit' be a better choice?

                Dave
                --
                Mi diras la veron. Mi ne mensogas. (1a Timoteo 1:7b)
              • Jim Henry
                ... What might be better is to give a table with the Latin letter in one column, the IPA value of each letter in one column, and an approximate English
                Message 7 of 12 , Mar 2, 2007
                • 0 Attachment
                  On 3/2/07, Dave Rutan <rutan3@...> wrote:

                  > >> One thing to remember is
                  > >> that since English dialects differ so much, it can be kind of
                  > >> ambiguous or confusing to give pronunciations based on English words.
                  > >> E.g. you say <ui> is like in <suit>, which for me is /u/, an 'oo'

                  > Would 'fruit' be a better choice?

                  What might be better is to give a table with the Latin letter in one
                  column, the IPA value of each letter in one column, and an approximate
                  English equivalent in another column; and also make it clear what
                  English dialect you are basing the English approximations on.

                  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Phonetic_Alphabet

                  And I suppose a conhistorical explanation of the Latin orthography
                  with English letter-values could be that it was devised by missionaries
                  familiar only with English and Breehah, and no linguistic training
                  -- no knowledge of IPA, for instance. I would expect such an orthography
                  might fail to represent some of the significant phonemic
                  distinctions in Breehah.

                  --
                  Jim Henry
                  http://www.pobox.com/~jimhenry/gzb/gzb.htm
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.