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Re: sociolinguistics project help

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  • Herman Miller
    ... Herman Miller ... 42 ... Computer programmer (or software engineer as the official title goes). ... A few of the major ones include Olaetian (my first
    Message 1 of 26 , Nov 30, 2006
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      Alicia Chang wrote:
      > This is a class project for sociolinguistics class that I am taking this
      > semester. My project begins primarily focusing on Elvish and Klingon and
      > those who speak/study it and have created a community out of it. I want to
      > expand this project by looking at those who create their own languages. I
      > guess I am seeking the motivation that drives you guys to create your own
      > languages. What made created languages (your own or others) so much more
      > fascinating that real ones?
      > For those who are interested in helping out with my project, these are
      > the questions I have come up with:
      > Basics:
      > Name:
      Herman Miller

      > Age:
      42

      > Occupation:
      Computer programmer (or "software engineer" as the official title goes).

      > Language questions:
      > What languages have you created?
      A few of the major ones include Olaetian (my first language), Jarda,
      Tirelat, and Minza. I have many more languages in varying stages of
      development from crude sketches to languages suitable for brief
      translations. More recent developments include Yasaro, Tiki, and Nimrina.

      > How extensively have you developed them?
      I did a lot of writing in Olaetian back when that was my main language
      (several pages worth, but nothing very long). Tirelat and Minza have
      enough grammar and vocabulary that I've used them in translation relays.
      Not many of my languages have more than a few hundred words, and only a
      few of them have much of a grammar.

      > If it is possible, can you give me a few example words from these languages?
      Here's a few random words from Minza, my most recent language (avoiding
      words with accented characters for convenience):

      tori "to throw"
      viek "frying pan"
      liatei "flute"
      seret "meantone temperament" (a historical tuning system)
      kyzika "dandelion"
      ligui "yellow-green"
      muari "shop, store"
      vezgi "to be in charge of"
      toka "steel"
      ikeri "bandicoot"

      > If there any, what are the real-life roots/inspirations for your languages?
      I borrow ideas from a number of languages. From reading about Australian
      languages like Dyirbal and Yidiny, I found out about the "ergative /
      absolutive" case system as linguists call it, which uses one case
      (ergative) for the subject of transitive verbs, and a different case
      (absolutive) for both the object of transitive verbs and the subject of
      intransitive verbs. Some of my recent languages have been influenced by
      languages such as Fijian and Malagasy, which have an unusual verb -
      object - subject word order. Some of my earlier languages from the early
      to mid 1980's were influenced by the grammar of the Slavic languages.

      > What caused you to become interested in creating your own language?
      Most likely, the alien languages in the Star Wars movies were one of the
      major influences. Now I've seen the extras on the DVD, and I find out
      the language spoken by Greedo in the original Star Wars was just a
      linguist imitating the sounds of Quechua! But at the time I didn't know
      any better, so I went ahead and started creating my own alien languages
      with their own writing systems, grammar, and vocabulary.

      > What do these languages/creating languages mean to you? Feel free to
      > interpret this question in any fashion you desire.

      For one thing, it's one of my longest-running hobbies, something I never
      seem to lose interest in. It's closely tied to my interest in languages
      and sound in general (music, bird songs, etc.) Some of the languages are
      associated with a fictional world that I've been developing, with
      various non-human characters (some closer to human than others), but
      it's been a long time since I had any interest in writing stories. Other
      languages of mine are more of a way to play around with the meanings of
      words and the structure of how words are put together, rather than
      having an associated fictional culture.

      > What have these languages given to you? Personally? In terms of a
      > community? Etc.
      > Thanks. Alicia

      Well, some languages do give me new ways of thinking about things, as I
      try to define words that don't exactly correspond with English, and
      include grammatical features that are foreign to English. Tirelat for
      instance has obligatory evidential marking, which means that every time
      I write a Tirelat sentence I have to consider the source of the
      information (whether I personally experienced something, heard it from
      someone else, etc.) The relay translation exercises, where you take a
      text in someone else's language and translate it into your own and pass
      it on, are a lot of fun. Mostly, though, it's just a way to pass time
      and keep myself occupied.
    • wayne chevrier
      alchang@BERKELEY.EDU nevesht: This is a class project for sociolinguistics class that I am taking this semester. My project begins primarily focusing on
      Message 2 of 26 , Dec 2, 2006
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        alchang@... nevesht:> > This is a class project for sociolinguistics class that I am taking this > semester. My project begins primarily focusing on Elvish and Klingon and > those who speak/study it and have created a community out of it. I want to > expand this project by looking at those who create their own languages. I > guess I am seeking the motivation that drives you guys to create your own > languages. What made created languages (your own or others) so much more > fascinating that real ones?> For those who are interested in helping out with my project, these are > the questions I have come up with:> Basics:> Name:
        Wayne Chevrier
        > Age:
        34
        > Occupation:
        customer service
        > > Language questions:> What languages have you created?
        > How extensively have you developed them?
        3 that are more than just an idea
        Lisanek/lISanEk/:signifcant grammar, a few words, phonotactics
        L2:no words, some grammar
        Lisa`nre/lisanH_Lre/:grammar, growing vocab, phonotactics, no affixes yet> If it is possible, can you give me a few example words from these languages?
        lisanek: balko(cousin male definate singular), balki(f.pl), balken(indefinate.f.sg)
        lisanre: telda: left, south; nalku/narak:raccoon; buhhi/buhy; hand,arm; zeyeu/zeiyewi:sister of male, younger sister of female
        > If there any, what are the real-life roots/inspirations for your languages?
        for many words in lisanre I used words from various langs backwards and adapted to the phonotactics> What caused you to become interested in creating your own language?
        JRRT mostly> What do these languages/creating languages mean to you? Feel free to > interpret this question in any fashion you desire.
        I enjoy creating the pattern of the language and cullture> What have these languages given to you? Personally? In terms of a > community? Etc.
        the enjoyment of doing it, the CONLANGlist(often fascinating)> Thanks. AliciaYou;re Welcome--Wayne Chevrier



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      • Roger Mills
        ... 2, going on 3, for a fictional world; by name, Kash, Gwr, Prevli (I exclude 2 created as a teen-ager; almost nothing survives, thank God...) ... Kash--
        Message 3 of 26 , Dec 2, 2006
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          For Alicia Chang:
          > For those who are interested in helping out with my project, these are
          > the questions I have come up with:

          > Basics:
          > Name: Roger Mills
          > Age: 72
          > Occupation: Retired; briefly a linguistics prof., then other things. :-(
          >
          > Language questions:
          > What languages have you created?
          2, going on 3, for a fictional world; by name, Kash, Gwr, Prevli
          (I exclude 2 created as a teen-ager; almost nothing survives, thank God...)

          > How extensively have you developed them?
          Kash-- essentially complete, vocab. 5000 and growing.
          Gwr-- maybe 30-40%, mainly due to self-imposed design criteria; vocab.
          around 400.
          Prevli-- just some glimmerings

          > If it is possible, can you give me a few example words from these
          > languages?
          Kash: numbers 1-5, mesa, ro, sila, ha, nim; vacan 'believe', deriv.
          caka/vacan 'too trusting, gullible'; horem 'die' > causative rukorem 'turn
          off, extinguish'

          Gwr: bòng (low tone)< *bábam 'thunder', bwang (mid)'to thunder' < *babám;
          chi (mid) 'awkward' < *kirí, kr (mid) 'left(hand) < *kíri
          (Every proto-form has at least 2 potential outcomes, depending on the
          original stress; hence the difficulty, and the possibilities)

          Prevli: vondo (~vonor) plant extract for stunning fish
          gunsa-magra 'psychotropic drug used by shamans'
          yotsu (~yotus) 'an edible plant'

          > If there any, what are the real-life roots/inspirations for your
          > languages?
          Kash: basically Indonesian + Spanish, with some outright (but distorted)
          borrowings; bisyl. roots with several regular derivations, but also verbal
          conjugation and noun-cases.

          Gwr: Chinese, Vietnamese-- monosyllabic, tonal (no borrowings unless
          accidental)

          Prevli: inspired by Leti, a language of eastern Indonesia (look it up!!); no
          borrowings

          > What caused you to become interested in creating your own language?
          Reading too much Ursula LeGuin at one sitting !! (Plus my own interest in
          languages of SE Asia)

          > What do these languages/creating languages mean to you? Feel free to
          > interpret this question in any fashion you desire.
          It's primarily an intellectual exercise I suppose; but my aim is to produce
          something viable and realistic, in accord with it's own culture. Perhaps too
          it's a way of envisioning a slightly better or more interesting world than
          our own.

          > What have these languages given to you? Personally? In terms of a
          > community? Etc.
          A lot of fun and good material for fantasizing; a lot of good contact with
          fellow conlangers via this list. Up to 1999, when I got my first computer, I
          was utterly unaware there was such a huge and varied community.

          > What made created languages (your own or others) so much more
          > fascinating that real ones?
          My own are not, necessarily; except that I can control how they develop.
          Others'-- provide an insight into how other people approach similar
          problems; always interesting to see how another mind works :-))))

          http://cinduworld.tripod.com/contents.htm
        • Sylvia Sotomayor
          ... Sylvia Sotomayor ... 40 ... Field Sales Rep ... Kēlen ... I would say, extensively, but then I figure something new out and realize how much I have left
          Message 4 of 26 , Dec 4, 2006
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            On 11/29/06, Alicia Chang <alchang@...> wrote:
            > For those who are interested in helping out with my project, these are
            > the questions I have come up with:
            > Basics:
            > Name:
            Sylvia Sotomayor

            > Age:
            40

            > Occupation:
            Field Sales Rep

            > Language questions:
            > What languages have you created?
            Kēlen

            > How extensively have you developed them?
            I would say, extensively, but then I figure something new out and
            realize how much I have left to do.

            > If it is possible, can you give me a few example words from these languages?
            wa jasōri pa jamārwakiji xō;
            LA.neg N.pl(words) PA N.pl(wonders) MOD(those)
            There are no words for those wonders.

            ñi antārranni antōrreni;
            NI N.co(rain) N.co(stopped)
            The rain stopped.

            > If there any, what are the real-life roots/inspirations for your languages?
            None really. Lots of languages helped by shoing me how a feature
            worked or by giving me ideas, but Kēlen isn't based on any one or few
            languages. It is however an experiment in refuting the idea that
            languages need to have verbs.

            > What caused you to become interested in creating your own language?
            Tolkien at too young an age of course.

            > What do these languages/creating languages mean to you?
            This is my art. It's what I do when I am not working or reading. I
            would be a different person without Kēlen.

            > What have these languages given to you?
            A sense of being special and not simply another nameless, faceless cog
            in society. God that sounds maudlin. But in a sense it is true. Kēlen
            is part of my identity in the same way a person's achievements and
            family are. When I am depressed and thinking of how unimportant I am,
            Kēlen is an example of something that would not exist without me.
            Sure, there are other things, but Kēlen is completely mine and mine
            alone. When I am not depressed, I take a delight in how intricate
            Kēlen is and how much fun I have making the grammar and expressing
            things in it. And how much I enjoy sharing it with the conlanging
            community. (Not that I've posted much lately, sorry.) And
            participating in relays. :-)

            OK, that is a bit personal, but I will post it anyway.

            -S
            --
            Sylvia Sotomayor
            terjemar@...
            www.terjemar.net
          • Gary Shannon
            ... Igpaya Ussianruski (Pig Russian in 1950), an unnamed pictographic written language, Tazhu, Soaloa, Madjal, Kalusa, Mutlak, and several unnamed sketches,
            Message 5 of 26 , Dec 4, 2006
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              --- Alicia Chang <alchang@...> wrote:


              > Basics:
              > Name: Gary Shannon
              > Age: 62
              > Occupation: Computer Programmer
              >
              > Language questions:
              > What languages have you created?
              Igpaya Ussianruski (Pig Russian in 1950), an unnamed pictographic written
              language, Tazhu, Soaloa, Madjal, Kalusa, Mutlak, and several unnamed sketches,
              plus dozens of lost languages from my ancient childhood.

              > How extensively have you developed them?
              My unnamed pictographic language had several thousand words and I used it for
              taking notes and writing my personal journal. I became very fluent in it for
              reading and writing, but it was a written language only, and could not be
              spoken. Tazhu has gone through several incarnations and is fairly extensive.
              Kalusa is a colaborative project with several other conlangers.

              > If it is possible, can you give me a few example words from these languages?
              You can view the Tazhu lexicon and my other projects at
              http://www.fiziwig.com/index2.html -- FROM McGuffy's Reader in Tazhu:
              57. Come here, girls! I see a nest. Reviako tekiri! Vizo seteriagu.
              58. Little birds are in it. Shadaradini lentrento eta. (Tizne sharadi lentrento
              eta.)

              > If there any, what are the real-life roots/inspirations for your languages?
              My pictographic language started out as a way to jot down notes on gestures and
              hand positions while I studied American Sign Language for a couple of
              semesters. Tazhu was sort of inspired by my high school Latin class.

              > What caused you to become interested in creating your own language?
              When I was five years old my dad taught me Pig Latin. It was so much fun that I
              refined it to create Pig Russian (Igpaya Ussianruski). Between that and my
              interest in real languages as well as ciphers and codes I've dabbled in "secret
              languages" for over 55 years now. I have formally studied Latin, German and
              Russian in high school and college.

              > What do these languages/creating languages mean to you? Feel free to
              > interpret this question in any fashion you desire.
              Most of all it helps me to understand my own language and languages in general.
              I've always been interested in artificial intelligence, and a pet project is
              trying to write computer programs that can converse intelligently in English.
              To do so requires deep understanding of how language in general works, but
              being the curmudgeon that I am, I am not at all satisfied with what has been
              proposed by mainstream theorists in this area. They just don't get it, and fool
              that I am, I think I do. I guess that makes me a fringe-dwelling crackpot, or
              linguistic mad scientist.

              > What have these languages given to you? Personally? In terms of a
              > community? Etc.
              Nothing more than a way to idle away a few hours here and there and hopefully
              come to a better understanding of language in general.

              > Thanks. Alicia
              >

              --gary
            • Sally Caves
              I m sorry to come so late to this, Alicia, and I hope it s in time for your project, but the semester is almost over. ... From: Alicia Chang
              Message 6 of 26 , Dec 10, 2006
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                I'm sorry to come so late to this, Alicia, and I hope it's in time for your
                project, but the semester is almost over.

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "Alicia Chang" <alchang@...>


                > For those who are interested in helping out with my project, these are
                > the questions I have come up with:

                > Basics:

                Since I'm so pressed for time, Alicia, I invite you to look at the page
                I put up
                on basics: http://www.frontiernet.net/~scaves/whatsteo.html Sorry not
                to post
                it here, but that site will tell you what you need to know about the
                volitional and
                non-volitional aspect, the split nominative, the law of detachability,
                etc.

                > Name: Sally Caves
                > Age: 53
                > Occupation: University Professor (hence in your position: hurrying to
                > finish
                my semester duties!)
                >
                > Language questions:
                > What languages have you created?

                Teonaht is my main one. I have thought about dialects of Teonaht
                (Menarilis), and about
                one of the UR-languages it has incorporated (Nenddeyly), but not
                documented them.

                > How extensively have you developed them?

                As extensively as I can! I've been working on it since I was ten, and
                picked it up
                again in graduate school, then again in my first years as a university
                prof, and then
                again, wildly, when I discovered this listserv. It has a vocabulary of
                about 3000
                words, many of them not posted on the Internet. I'm working to increase
                my
                vocabulary, and started a taxonomy some years ago, still unfinished:
                http://www.frontiernet.net/~scaves/teotax.html


                > If it is possible, can you give me a few example words from these
                > languages?

                Krefimort. A word uttered that is harmful, but escapes your lips
                unexpectedly
                or rashly. It's also a rebuke: Krefimort! Uttered by the people you
                have offended.
                It means "fist to mouth."

                Felrreo. A complicated word that means a wraith of a living person, but
                most often
                an invented person that begins to take over your life. An imaginary
                friend, for instance.
                A ghost. A demon lover, etc. There's a really weird novel by I forget
                whom, published
                by Tor, called _The Pillow Friend_. There you have it. It means
                "lovely prisoner." An
                invented creature that struggles to escape your influence.

                Kemkrilyt, "labyrinthine." Difficult, complex; also an aesthetic.
                Kemkkrily means
                "something that is beautiful in its complexity or difficulty." A
                puzzle, too

                delry hejvan. "I happied." A stative verb that expresses mental
                attitudes.
                delry bovin. "I blued." A word meaning I felt lofty, reserved, aloof,
                as far
                away as the sky. Elry is a combination of the preterite particle and
                the
                first person pronoun. In stative verbs, the verbal-noun suffix prefixes
                the preterite particle. Present tense

                Yry firrimby. "As for me, grateful." A non-volitional expression that
                means "thank you," for a gift or a deed that I have had no control over.

                > If there any, what are the real-life roots/inspirations for your
                > languages?

                Many! Teonaht is primarily a-priori, but I have been impressed by
                structures
                from Welsh and German (infixed and separable prefixes). Teonaht has
                been
                described as Indo-European, but it also has some non-IE features, and a
                vocabulary that is largely not IE. In my salad days, (ten, eleven years
                old)
                I was impressed by Spanish syntax, but I soon moved beyond that. T. is
                emphatically not an inflected language. There are very few case endings
                (word order is essential, then, but somewhat flexible), and the verb is
                without conjugation, except by a closed class of prefixes.

                > What caused you to become interested in creating your own language?

                My exposure to Spanish, a need to gift my exotic people with their own
                language. I didn't hear about Tolkien until I had started this, and of
                course
                I knew nothing about political constructed languages. This was the
                early
                to mid sixties for me. I was also impressed by exotic cultures: Thai
                dress, Japanese architecture, medieval English romances, although the
                Teonim are most interesting to me now in their eighteenth and
                nineteenth-
                century eras. Think "steampunk."

                > What do these languages/creating languages mean to you? Feel free to
                > interpret this question in any fashion you desire.

                They are a part of the private world I inhabit and write about, and are
                akin to my making maps, models, miniatures, and simulacra.

                > What have these languages given to you? Personally? In terms of a
                > community? Etc.

                Since they were so private for so long, I didn't have a community!
                My family endorsed my private language and people, but didn't involve
                themselves in it. I did a lot of drawings of the "heaven cats" (which
                evolved into humans when I hit puberty), which were admired by
                my family, but the venture was pretty solitary, until I learned of
                CONLANG.
                What it has given me is an obsessive compulsive joy. It's also a
                creative
                burden. I am contemplating writing a memoire about it and it's
                obsessions.

                > Thanks. Alicia

                Vo tafwo! "No pain," i.e., you're welcome, de rien, etc. Here 'tis, better
                late than never.

                Sally
              • Carsten Becker
                Hi, ... Oooh, a questionnaire ... I m game if it s for the sake of science ;-) ... Carsten Becker ... 20 ... Trainee (publishing assistant) ... Ayeri,
                Message 7 of 26 , Dec 11, 2006
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                  Hi,

                  Alicia Chang <alchang@...> schrieb:

                  > This is a class project for sociolinguistics class that I
                  > am taking this semester. My project begins primarily
                  > focusing on Elvish and Klingon and those who speak/study
                  > it and have created a community out of it. I want to
                  > expand this project by looking at those who create their
                  > own languages. I guess I am seeking the motivation that
                  > drives you guys to create your own languages. What made
                  > created languages (your own or others) so much more
                  > fascinating that real ones? For those who are interested
                  > in helping out with my project, these are
                  > the questions I have come up with:

                  Oooh, a questionnaire ... I'm game if it's for the sake of
                  science ;-)

                  > Name:

                  Carsten Becker

                  > Age:

                  20

                  > Occupation:

                  Trainee (publishing assistant)

                  > What languages have you created?

                  Ayeri, Daléian, [The Nameless Language]

                  > How extensively have you developed them?

                  Good question ....

                  Ayeri: ~1500 words, a grammar whose weakness is that I
                  haven't yet thought thoroughly enough about syntax, or
                  rather, the language still suffers from being maybe a bit
                  English at times. I also haven't got any idioms or such yet
                  despite of the lexicon size. I haven't thought about poetry
                  or style in general, too. Another thing I'm not too happy
                  with is that the grammar is absolutely regular. I'm working
                  on Ayeri since December 2003.

                  Example sentence:

                  Adanyareng notahānaris si sipikaiyuang ayaris: tavyam
                  koronyam narānyearis ahiroye -- tavyam koronyam
                  mavayyearis ahiroye.

                  /a.ˌdɑn.ja.ˈrɛŋ ˌno.ta.ˈhaː.na.rɪs si ˈsi.pi.ˌka.ju.ˈɑŋ
                  a.ˈja.rɪs ta.ˈvjɑm ˌko.ron.ˈjɑm na.ˌraːn.jə.ˈa.rɪs
                  ˌa.hi.ˈro.jə ta.ˈvjɑm ˌko.ron.ˈjɑm ma.ˈvɑj.jə.ˈa.rɪs
                  ˌa.hi.ˈro.jə/

                  that-one.AGT-inan (is) longing.PAT-ani REL
                  drive.3s-n.AGT-ani 1s.PAT-ani : get.BEN know.BEN
                  word.PL.PAT-ani CPL(PAT-ani).new.PL -- get.BEN know.BEN
                  world.PL.PAT-ani CPL(PAT-ani).new.PL

                  For this is the longing that drives me: to get to know new
                  words – to get to know new worlds.

                  What isn't clear from this example is that Ayeri is supposed
                  to be a trigger language like Tagalog among others, that
                  basically means that all arguments of a verb can be made
                  subjects, not just the direct object. People have told me
                  that this language sounds like a bend between Hindi and
                  Indonesian with some generic Elvish thrown in or something
                  to that effect, which is essentially what I intended, except
                  for the Elvishness.

                  Daléian: ~400 words. The grammar is essentially a mix
                  between German (my native language), English and French with
                  some odds about adjectives thrown in, that is, adjective are
                  handled like stative verbs.

                  Example sentence:

                  I'm sorry, but I haven't worked enough on Daléian to be
                  able to translate things. However, its sound could be
                  maybe best compared to Turkish, at least that's what
                  others have said. The grammar is still up at
                  www.beckerscarsten.de/?conlang=daleian . Unlike Ayeri,
                  which is very much agglutinative, Daléian is largely
                  inflecting, but it could be more fusional for an
                  inflecting language.

                  > If it is possible, can you give me a few example words
                  > from these languages? If there any, what are the
                  > real-life roots/inspirations for your languages?

                  Ayeri: Read http://tinyurl.com/fqmrr .
                  I don't feel like repeating my ramblings on Ayeri's
                  meta-history every time I'm asked that question ;-)

                  Daléian: Nothing in particular. I got bored with my very
                  first conlang, which is essentially a rip-off of German.

                  > What
                  > caused you to become interested in creating your own
                  > language?

                  A general affinity towards language I guess. Also, I've
                  appreciated Tolkien's detailed work, so that I found Mark
                  Rosenfelder's "Language Construction Kit"
                  (www.zompist.com/kit.htm I think was the URL, however it's
                  at Zompist's) via Helge Fauskanger's "Ardalambion" page and
                  thought it would be funny to try it out myself.

                  > What do these languages/creating languages mean to you?

                  I've abandoned my first conlang (The Nameless Language) and
                  I've half-abandoned Daléian. I know I could do more with
                  Ayeri, but at the moment I don't really feel like changing
                  or reworking major parts of the grammar. So the only new
                  thing I did for it during the last year was making up tons
                  of words, which was due to translating things. However,
                  Ayeri is dear to me in so far as all the vocabulary except a
                  handful of words (say, 20 or so) is completely hand-crafted.
                  As others have probably already told you, it is important to
                  me that the words "feel right". It's maybe some kind of an
                  emotional binding, I don't know, however, I need to be able
                  to identify myself with my work. Just like Henrik said, a
                  constructing languages could in my opinion be best compared
                  to a painting or sculpture or other kind of art. An
                  artificial languge other than auxiliary languages (we call
                  them "artlangs"), is not useful for the public in my
                  opinion, but for me it is too some kind of art that I
                  practise to please my own sense of aesthetics. And if others
                  like it, the better it is. It maybe worth to mention that
                  many people in the conlanging community are playing musical
                  instruments, some people even compose their own music in
                  their spare time.

                  > What have these languages given to you? Personally? In
                  > terms of a community? Etc.

                  A better grasp of how Language works. Community... there
                  aren't many conlangers out there, except here and some other
                  few places on the web, so the community is not real-life but
                  only web-based. Over on the ZBB, they're keen on meeting
                  every now and then, though, especially since the rate of
                  British conlangers is pretty high compared to the handful of
                  dedicated German members. Maybe there aren't so many German
                  conlangers because most of the conlanging stuff you can find
                  is in English? I don't know. However, I once endeavoured to
                  translate the Language Construction Kit into German so as to
                  contribute some more material to the German "market", but I
                  failed, since this beast is quite difficult to translate at
                  times. (So if anyone would like to join me, I'd be grateful
                  ;-) )

                  Hope that helps?

                  Yours,
                  Carsten

                  --
                  "Miranayam kepauara naranoaris." (Kalvin nay Hobbes)
                  Venena, Dalming 15, 2316 ya 15:03:06 pd

                  (Monday, December 11, 2006 at 05:18:41 pm)
                • Steven Williams
                  ... Hey! I had the same idea, too, a few years ago. Someone managed to translate it into Portuguese, so it can t be an insurmountable challenge. But since I m
                  Message 8 of 26 , Dec 11, 2006
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                    --- Carsten Becker <carbeck@...> schrieb:

                    > However, I once endeavoured to translate the
                    > Language Construction Kit into German so as to
                    > contribute some more material to the
                    > German "market", but I failed, since this beast is
                    > quite difficult to translate at times. (So if anyone
                    > would like to join me, I'd be grateful ;-) )

                    Hey! I had the same idea, too, a few years ago.
                    Someone managed to translate it into Portuguese, so it
                    can't be an insurmountable challenge. But since I'm a
                    native speaker of English, and German's only my second
                    language, I decided to hold off, lest I make myself
                    look like an utter idiot to the German conlanging
                    community.

                    When the upcoming semester's done and over with here
                    at my university (some time in May or June), I'll have
                    time to consider it again. You up for it? I love a challenge.



                    ___________________________________________________________
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                  • Carsten Becker
                    On Mon, 11 Dec 2006 18:26:25 +0100, Carsten Becker wrote: Damn, I tried to write a stylistically nice text but I forgot
                    Message 9 of 26 , Dec 12, 2006
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                      On Mon, 11 Dec 2006 18:26:25 +0100, Carsten Becker <carbeck@...>
                      wrote:

                      <yadda yadda>

                      Damn, I tried to write a stylistically nice text but I forgot to write down
                      some prepositions and instances of "to be" every now and then. Hope you
                      don't mind :-P

                      C.

                      (This mail was brought to you from work -- <rant> I'm actually not allowed
                      to use the web privately here, but there's nobody in my department at the
                      moment and I'm finished with the work they gave me, so I haven't got
                      anything to do except sitting around. </rant>)
                    • Carsten Becker
                      ... Yeah, why not. Yours, Carsten -- Miranayam kepauara naranoaris. (Kalvin nay Hobbes) Tenena, Dalming 19, 2316 ya 04:09:40 pd (Thursday, December 14, 2006
                      Message 10 of 26 , Dec 14, 2006
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                        Steven Williams <feurieaux@...> schrieb:

                        > When the upcoming semester's done and over with here
                        > at my university (some time in May or June), I'll have
                        > time to consider it again. You up for it? I love a
                        > challenge.

                        Yeah, why not.

                        Yours,
                        Carsten

                        --
                        "Miranayam kepauara naranoaris." (Kalvin nay Hobbes)
                        Tenena, Dalming 19, 2316 ya 04:09:40 pd

                        (Thursday, December 14, 2006 at 06:03:10 pm)
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