Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

OT: Another Portuguese (?) question

Expand Messages
  • Roger Mills
    Do any of our Port. speakers know whether a word like cutão or similar exists, or used to exist-- it would pertain to knives/blades. It is not in my little
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 4, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Do any of our Port. speakers know whether a word like "cutão" or similar
      exists, or used to exist-- it would pertain to knives/blades. It is not in
      my little dictionary, but I think I've seen it elsewhere. Or perhaps old
      Spanish?

      Alternatively, do any of our Japanese scholars know the origin of _katana_
      "sword" (perhaps the Samurais' sword in particular, I'm not sure)?

      In addition to the Jap. word, I find "katana ~k@tana" = knife in old sources
      for various languages of eastern Indonesia/Ambonese area; since borrowing
      from Jap. or vice-versa is not a real possibility, only Port. (less likely
      Span.) remains as the only reasonable source in both languages.

      Thanks in advance :-)
      Roger
    • Mark J. Reed
      I can t help, really, other than to point out that katana is, IIRC, both the general word for sword as an overarching weapon class, and also a more
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 4, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        I can't help, really, other than to point out that "katana" is, IIRC,
        both the general word for "sword" as an overarching weapon class, and
        also a more specific term for the particular variety of long sword
        that constitutes the "dai" in the traditional Samurai two-sword set
        (called "daishoo", which is a portmanteau of "daitoo" = long sword +
        "shootoo" = short sword). The smaller sword is called a "wakizashi".

        Benefits of having a best friend in high school who wanted to be a
        ninja. (And therefore thought the curvature of the katana a waste of
        metal when compared to the straighter sword associated with the
        assassins, which he called a ninjatoo).

        Again IIRC, the morpheme "too" that appears in "daishoo" and "shootoo"
        (and "ninjatoo") means "blade"; it also appears in "tantoo"="knife".
        The rule of thumb is that blades under one foot are tantoo, blades of
        1-2 feet are shootoo, and blades of 2+ feet are daishoo.

        (Technically the unit is the Japanese shaku rather than the English
        foot, but they are approximately equivalent at about 30 cm).

        If you need any more useless information only tangentially related to
        your actual question, you know where to find me.

        :)
      • João Ricardo de Mendonça
        I don t know the word cutão . Looking in my roommate s small dictionary, I found cotão , which is those little balls of dust and hair that gather in the
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 4, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          I don't know the word "cutão". Looking in my roommate's small dictionary, I found "cotão", which is those little balls of dust and hair that gather in the corner of your room. "Cutão" might be a variant of it, because pretonic /o/ is realized as [u] in many dialects.

          There is also the word "cutelo", which is a kind of knife. They may be related in some way.

          (I'm using Gmail: please change the "To" address to conlang@...)

          João Ricardo


          On 04/11/06, Roger Mills <rfmilly@...> wrote:
          Do any of our Port. speakers know whether a word like "cutão" or similar
          exists, or used to exist-- it would pertain to knives/blades. It is not in
          my little dictionary, but I think I've seen it elsewhere. Or perhaps old
          Spanish?

          Alternatively, do any of our Japanese scholars know the origin of _katana_
          "sword" (perhaps the Samurais' sword in particular, I'm not sure)?

          In addition to the Jap. word, I find "katana ~k@tana" = knife in old sources
          for various languages of eastern Indonesia/Ambonese area; since borrowing
          from Jap. or vice-versa is not a real possibility, only Port. (less likely
          Span.) remains as the only reasonable source in both languages.

          Thanks in advance :-)
          Roger

        • Eric Christopherson
          ... I think in that last paragraph, you meant daitoo when you wrote daishoo . :)
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 4, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            On Nov 4, 2006, at 8:54 PM, Mark J. Reed wrote:

            > I can't help, really, other than to point out that "katana" is, IIRC,
            > both the general word for "sword" as an overarching weapon class, and
            > also a more specific term for the particular variety of long sword
            > that constitutes the "dai" in the traditional Samurai two-sword set
            > (called "daishoo", which is a portmanteau of "daitoo" = long sword +
            > "shootoo" = short sword). The smaller sword is called a "wakizashi".
            >
            > Benefits of having a best friend in high school who wanted to be a
            > ninja. (And therefore thought the curvature of the katana a waste of
            > metal when compared to the straighter sword associated with the
            > assassins, which he called a ninjatoo).
            >
            > Again IIRC, the morpheme "too" that appears in "daishoo" and "shootoo"
            > (and "ninjatoo") means "blade"; it also appears in "tantoo"="knife".
            > The rule of thumb is that blades under one foot are tantoo, blades of
            > 1-2 feet are shootoo, and blades of 2+ feet are daishoo.
            >

            I think in that last paragraph, you meant "daitoo" when you wrote
            "daishoo". :)

            > (Technically the unit is the Japanese shaku rather than the English
            > foot, but they are approximately equivalent at about 30 cm).
            >
            > If you need any more useless information only tangentially related to
            > your actual question, you know where to find me.
            >
            > :)
          • Mark J. Reed
            ... Whups, yes. The morpheme too is nowhere to be found in daishoo . :) Daishoo on the brain. -- Mark J. Reed
            Message 5 of 5 , Nov 5, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              On 11/5/06, Eric Christopherson <rakko@...> wrote:
              > I think in that last paragraph, you meant "daitoo" when you wrote
              > "daishoo". :)

              Whups, yes. The morpheme "too" is nowhere to be found in "daishoo". :)

              Daishoo on the brain.
              --
              Mark J. Reed <markjreed@...>
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.