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Re: Artlangers vs. auxlangers (was Re: Tell your conlang story!)

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  • Dana Nutter
    ... Me too! ... Me neither. ... dejnx nxtxr / Dana Nutter LI SASXSEK LATIS. http://www.nutter.net/sasxsek
    Message 1 of 18 , Mar 1, 2006
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      > [mailto:CONLANG@...] On Behalf Of Arthaey Angosii
      > Emaelivpeith Joe:
      > > Henrik Theiling wrote:
      > > >"Mark J. Reed" <markjreed@...> writes:
      > > > >The verb "to have prejudices" is quite irregular, and in
      > fact only
      > > >>resembles its infinitive in the third person: "he has prejudices".
      > > >>The second person form is "you have biases".
      > > >
      > > >Really? That's a funny irregularity. That was a
      > translato then. :-)
      > >
      > > I think he's joking. Maybe.
      >
      > And if he's not joking, then it must only be true for certain people.
      > I'm a native (Californian) English speaker,

      Me too!

      > and I have no warning
      > bells going off in my head when I read "you have prejudices."

      Me neither.


      ------------------------------
      dejnx nxtxr / Dana Nutter

      LI SASXSEK LATIS.
      http://www.nutter.net/sasxsek
    • Peter Bleackley
      ... I thought it was- I speak my mind You re opinionated He s a bigot. Pete
      Message 2 of 18 , Mar 2, 2006
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        staving Joe:
        >Henrik Theiling wrote:
        >
        >>Hi!
        >>
        >>"Mark J. Reed" <markjreed@...> writes:
        >>
        >>
        >>>On 3/1/06, Henrik Theiling <theiling@...> wrote:
        >>>
        >>>
        >>>>Please! You have prejudices against auxlangers, ok, but this does not
        >>>>mean we want to risk a flamewar here.
        >>>>
        >>>Ahm. I don't mean to be rude, but you seem to have made a grammatical
        >>>error here, and as a non-native English speaker, I thought you might
        >>>appreciate a correction.
        >>>
        >>
        >>I do! :-)
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >>>The verb "to have prejudices" is quite irregular, and in fact only
        >>>resembles its infinitive in the third person: "he has prejudices".
        >>>The second person form is "you have biases".
        >>>
        >>
        >>Really? That's a funny irregularity. That was a translato then. :-)
        >>
        >
        >I think he's joking. Maybe.

        I thought it was-

        I speak my mind
        You're opinionated
        He's a bigot.

        Pete
      • Peter Bleackley
        ... Which is why the heraldic motto of Ankh-Morpork is QUANTI CANICULA ILLE IN FENESTRA Pete
        Message 3 of 18 , Mar 2, 2006
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          staving Andreas Johansson:



          >In a similar vein, Terry Pratchett has noted that farmers become insane, small
          >traders and craftsmen go mad, nobles become excentric, and a king may be a bit
          >confused and somewhat detached from reality.

          Which is why the heraldic motto of Ankh-Morpork is

          QUANTI CANICULA ILLE IN FENESTRA

          Pete
        • Mark J. Reed
          ... ... which is, of course, Latatian for How many dog butts are there in that window? (KIDDING!) -- Mark J. Reed
          Message 4 of 18 , Mar 2, 2006
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            On 3/2/06, Peter Bleackley <Peter.Bleackley@...> wrote:

            > Which is why the heraldic motto of Ankh-Morpork is
            >
            > QUANTI CANICULA ILLE IN FENESTRA

            ... which is, of course, Latatian for "How many dog butts are there in
            that window?"

            (KIDDING!)

            --
            Mark J. Reed <markjreed@...>
          • Henrik Theiling
            Hi! ... I read your correction in exactly that way -- and considered it a translation mistake, since it s maximally quite direct in German, but not rude (at
            Message 5 of 18 , Mar 2, 2006
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              Hi!

              "Mark J. Reed" <markjreed@...> writes:
              > Oy. It was indeed a joke. I was trying to obliquely make the point
              > that directly calling someone "prejudiced" is somewhat rude (whatever
              > the facts of the case), hence the softening to "biased" in the second
              > person. The "conjugation" was completely of my own devising.

              I read your correction in exactly that way -- and considered it a
              translation mistake, since it's maximally quite direct in German, but
              not rude (at least in my judgement).

              **Henrik
              --
              Relay 13 is still running despite a choking relay list:
              http://www.conlang.info/relay/relay13.html
            • Adam Walker
              This native English speaker has no problem with Henrik s use of prejudices in that sentence. Adam ... Judindu ul isu, niturvud ul regu ul Erodu, ed simu segu
              Message 6 of 18 , Mar 2, 2006
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                This native English speaker has no problem with
                Henrik's use of prejudices in that sentence.

                Adam

                --- "Mark J. Reed" <markjreed@...> wrote:

                > On 3/1/06, Henrik Theiling <theiling@...>
                > wrote:
                > > Please! You have prejudices against auxlangers,
                > ok, but this does not
                > > mean we want to risk a flamewar here.
                >
                > Ahm. I don't mean to be rude, but you seem to have
                > made a grammatical
                > error here, and as a non-native English speaker, I
                > thought you might
                > appreciate a correction.
                >
                > The verb "to have prejudices" is quite irregular,
                > and in fact only
                > resembles its infinitive in the third person: "he
                > has prejudices".
                > The second person form is "you have biases". (The
                > first-person form
                > is, of course, "I have keen insight into general
                > truths.")
                >
                > Just FYI.
                >
                > :)
                >
                > --
                > Mark J. Reed <markjreed@...>
                >


                Judindu ul isu, niturvud ul regu ul Erodu, ed simu segu al toda Jerosolima, ed cumvinid todis ils daliris djils pundivichis ed als scrivas djul pobuu pera demandari djuls sis, «¿Jundi aved ninadud ul Cristu?»

                Mach 2:3-4
              • Sai Emrys
                ... I second that. Native speaker (new york / california). However, you have prejudices is clearly plural to me - i.e. having multiple prejudices against the
                Message 7 of 18 , Mar 3, 2006
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                  On 3/1/06, Arthaey Angosii <arthaey@...> wrote:
                  > Emaelivpeith Joe:
                  > > Henrik Theiling wrote:
                  > > >"Mark J. Reed" <markjreed@...> writes:
                  > > > >The verb "to have prejudices" is quite irregular, and in fact only
                  > > >>resembles its infinitive in the third person: "he has prejudices".
                  > > >>The second person form is "you have biases".
                  > > >
                  > > >Really? That's a funny irregularity. That was a translato then. :-)
                  > >
                  > > I think he's joking. Maybe.
                  >
                  > And if he's not joking, then it must only be true for certain people.
                  > I'm a native (Californian) English speaker, and I have no warning
                  > bells going off in my head when I read "you have prejudices."

                  I second that. Native speaker (new york / california). However, "you
                  have prejudices" is clearly plural to me - i.e. having multiple
                  prejudices against the same thing.

                  A much more common version would be "you are prejudiced", but that's
                  also more pragmatically blunt ("you have" is softer).

                  - Sai
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