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A book report...

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  • Paul Bennett
    I forgot to brag about my Christmas haul. There was not much that was relevant to the group, but possibly of interest might be this gift from my parents: a
    Message 1 of 20 , Dec 31, 2005
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      I forgot to brag about my Christmas haul. There was not much that was
      relevant to the group, but possibly of interest might be this gift from my
      parents: a 1958 first edition of _The Decipherment Of Linear B_ by John
      Chadwick. It's a slimish paperback, the size of any normal paperback
      novel, more or less, with some light creasing on the spine, a library code
      or some other catalog code on a small sticker on the spine (the code is
      "489", does that mean anything to anyone?), and some quite light wear on
      the top of the front cover. Inside, the pages are tanned, but not
      horrifically so, considering it's a nearly 50 year old book. It smells
      wonderful -- that really good "old book" smell that draws you into the
      book and makes you feel immersed in the words. The words themselves are
      engaging and lively, and read easily as well as any detective novel (to
      which this is close kin, in a way). Original sale price: 95c. Worth now? I
      dunno, but to me it has instantly become a treasure. I plan to read it
      carefully but enthusiastically, from cover to cover.

      Were there any other linguistics books among our collective Holiday loot?




      Paul
    • Jefferson Wilson
      ... 489 is the Dewey Decimal Code for Other Hellenic languages And since this _is_ conlang, here s the entire 400 s (Language): 400 Language 401 Philosophy &
      Message 2 of 20 , Jan 1, 2006
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        Paul Bennett wrote:

        > a 1958 first edition of _The Decipherment Of Linear B_ by
        > John Chadwick. It's a slimish paperback, the size of any normal
        > paperback novel, more or less, with some light creasing on the spine, a
        > library code or some other catalog code on a small sticker on the spine
        > (the code is "489", does that mean anything to anyone?)

        489 is the Dewey Decimal Code for "Other Hellenic languages"

        And since this _is_ conlang, here's the entire 400's (Language):

        400 Language
        401 Philosophy & theory
        402 Miscellany
        403 Dictionaries & encyclopedias
        404 Special topics
        405 Serial publications
        406 Organizations & management
        407 Education, research, related topics
        408 With respect to kinds of persons
        409 Geographical & persons treatment
        410 Linguistics
        411 Writing systems
        412 Etymology
        413 Dictionaries
        414 Phonology
        415 Structural systems (Grammar)
        416 Not assigned or no longer used
        417 Dialectology & historical linguistics
        418 Standard usage Applied linguistics
        419 Verbal language not spoken or written
        420 English & Old English
        421 English writing system & phonology
        422 English etymology
        423 English dictionaries
        424 Not assigned or no longer used
        425 English grammar
        426 Not assigned or no longer used
        427 English language variations
        428 Standard English usage
        429 Old English (Anglo-Saxon)
        430 Germanic languages German
        431 German writing system & phonology
        432 German etymology
        433 German dictionaries
        434 Not assigned or no longer used
        435 German grammar
        436 Not assigned or no longer used
        437 German language variations
        438 Standard German usage
        439 Other Germanic languages
        440 Romance languages French
        441 French writing system & phonology
        442 French etymology
        443 French dictionaries
        444 Not assigned or no longer used
        445 French grammar
        446 Not assigned or no longer used
        447 French language variations
        448 Standard French usage
        449 Provencal & Catalan
        450 Italian, Romanian, Rhaeto-Romantic
        451 Italian writing system & phonology
        452 Italian etymology
        453 Italian dictionaries
        454 Not assigned or no longer used
        455 Italian grammar
        456 Not assigned or no longer used
        457 Italian language variations
        458 Standard Italian usage
        459 Romanian & Rhaeto-Romanic
        460 Spanish & Portugese languages
        461 Spanish writing system & phonology
        462 Spanish etymology
        463 Spanish dictionaries
        464 Not assigned or no longer used
        465 Spanish grammar
        466 Not assigned or no longer used
        467 Spanish language variations
        468 Standard Spanish usage
        469 Portugese
        470 Italic Latin
        471 Classical Latin writing & phonology
        472 Classical Latin etymology & phonology
        473 Classical Latin dictionaries
        474 Not assigned or no longer used
        475 Classical Latin grammar
        476 Not assigned or no longer used
        477 Old, Postclassical, Vulgar Latin
        478 Classical Latin usage
        479 Other Italic languages
        480 Hellenic languages Classical Greek
        481 Classical Greek writing & phonology
        482 Classical Greek etymology
        483 Classical Greek dictionaries
        484 Not assigned or no longer used
        485 Classical Greek grammar
        486 Not assigned or no longer used
        487 Preclassical & postclassical Greek
        488 Classical Greek usage
        489 Other Hellenic languages
        490 Other languages
        491 East Indo-European & Celtic languages
        492 Afro-Asiatic languages Semitic
        493 Non-Semitic Afro-Asiatic languages
        494 Ural-Altaic, Paleosiberian, Dravidian
        495 Languages of East & Southeast Asia
        496 African languages
        497 North American native languages
        498 South American native languages
        499 Miscellaneous languages

        (Easy to tell the system was developed in the early 1800's by a
        pan-European isn't it?)

        --
        Jefferson
        http://www.picotech.net/~jeff_wilson63/myths/
      • Jefferson Wilson
        ... And since I m actually more of Library of Congress person, here s the Library of Congress codes: CLASS P - LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE P Philology. Linguistics
        Message 3 of 20 , Jan 1, 2006
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          Jefferson Wilson wrote:

          > And since this _is_ conlang, here's the entire 400's (Language):

          And since I'm actually more of Library of Congress person, here's
          the Library of Congress codes:

          CLASS P - LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

          P Philology. Linguistics
          PA Greek language and literature. Latin language and literature
          PB Modern languages. Celtic languages
          PC Romanic languages
          PD Germanic languages. Scandinavian languages
          PE English language
          PF West Germanic languages
          PG Slavic languages. Baltic languages. Albanian language
          PH Uralic languages. Basque language
          PJ Oriental languages and literatures
          PK Indo-Iranian languages and literatures
          PL Languages and literatures of Eastern Asia, Africa, Oceania
          PM Hyperborean, Indian, and artificial languages
          PN Literature (General)
          PQ French literature - Italian literature - Spanish
          literature - Portuguese literature
          PR English literature
          PS American literature
          PT German literature - Dutch literature - Flemish literature
          since 1830 -Afrikaans literature - Scandinavian literature - Old
          Norse literature: Old Icelandic and Old Norwegian - Modern
          Icelandic literature - Faroese literature - Danish literature -
          Norwegian literature - Swedish literature
          PZ Fiction and juvenile belles lettres

          And, since it's of special interest to this list:

          PM8001-8995 Artificial languages--Universal languages
          PM8201-8298 Esperanto
          PM8999 Picture languages
          PM9001-9021 Secret languages

          --
          Jefferson
          http://www.picotech.net/~jeff_wilson63/myths/
        • Aaron Morse
          I didn t receive any linguistics books directly, but I was given a gift certificate with which I shall likely be purchasing Describing Morphosyntax and
          Message 4 of 20 , Jan 1, 2006
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            I didn't receive any linguistics books directly, but I was given a gift certificate with which I shall likely be purchasing "Describing Morphosyntax" and probably a Gaelic book.

            Paul Bennett <paul-bennett@...> wrote:
            I forgot to brag about my Christmas haul. There was not much that was
            relevant to the group, but possibly of interest might be this gift from my
            parents: a 1958 first edition of _The Decipherment Of Linear B_ by John
            Chadwick. It's a slimish paperback, the size of any normal paperback
            novel, more or less, with some light creasing on the spine, a library code
            or some other catalog code on a small sticker on the spine (the code is
            "489", does that mean anything to anyone?), and some quite light wear on
            the top of the front cover. Inside, the pages are tanned, bu! t not
            horrifically so, considering it's a nearly 50 year old book. It smells
            wonderful -- that really good "old book" smell that draws you into the
            book and makes you feel immersed in the words. The words themselves are
            engaging and lively, and read easily as well as any detective novel (to
            which this is close kin, in a way). Original sale price: 95c. Worth now? I
            dunno, but to me it has instantly become a treasure. I plan to read it
            carefully but enthusiastically, from cover to cover.

            Were there any other linguistics books among our collective Holiday loot?




            Paul


            Yahoo! Shopping
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          • Larry Sulky
            ... Languages of Asia and the Pacific: A Travellers Phrasebook , by Charles Hamblin, 1984. My wife found a copy via the Amazon used book service. Hardbound
            Message 5 of 20 , Jan 1, 2006
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              On 1/1/06, Aaron Morse <artlangs@...> wrote:
              > I didn't receive any linguistics books directly, but I was given a gift
              > certificate with which I shall likely be purchasing "Describing
              > Morphosyntax" and probably a Gaelic book.
              >
              > Paul Bennett <paul-bennett@...> wrote:
              ---SNIP---
              > Were there any other linguistics books among our collective Holiday loot?
              >
              > Paul
              >

              "Languages of Asia and the Pacific: A Travellers' Phrasebook", by
              Charles Hamblin, 1984. My wife found a copy via the Amazon used book
              service. Hardbound and in very good shape. Not particularly
              prestigious, but very handy.
              ---larry
            • caeruleancentaur
              ... I received a gift certificate for Barnes & Noble. A preliminary investigation tells me I ll need to take more time to find the right book. Charlie
              Message 6 of 20 , Jan 1, 2006
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                --- In conlang@yahoogroups.com, Paul Bennett <paul-bennett@E...> wrote:

                >Were there any other linguistics books among our collective Holiday
                >loot?

                I received a gift certificate for Barnes & Noble. A preliminary
                investigation tells me I'll need to take more time to find the right
                book.

                Charlie
                http://wiki.frath.net/user:caeruleancentaur
              • Gary Shannon
                From my nephew the Doctor: _Constructing a Language_ by Michael Tomasello. Harvard University Press ISBN 0674017641. 388 pages. And it s subtitled: A
                Message 7 of 20 , Jan 1, 2006
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                  From my nephew the Doctor: _Constructing a Language_
                  by Michael Tomasello. Harvard University Press ISBN
                  0674017641. 388 pages. And it's subtitled: "A
                  Usage-Based Theory of Language Acquistition." I
                  haven't started reading it yet, but it looks very
                  interesting.

                  --gary

                  --- Paul Bennett <paul-bennett@...> wrote:

                  > I forgot to brag about my Christmas haul. There was
                  > not much that was
                  > relevant to the group, but possibly of interest
                  > might be this gift from my
                  > parents: a 1958 first edition of _The Decipherment
                  > Of Linear B_ by John
                  > Chadwick.
                  <snip>
                • Andreas Johansson
                  ... I got a Swedish-Latin-Swedish dictionary. Andreas
                  Message 8 of 20 , Jan 1, 2006
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                    Quoting Aaron Morse <artlangs@...>:


                    > Were there any other linguistics books among our collective Holiday loot?

                    I got a Swedish-Latin-Swedish dictionary.


                    Andreas
                  • Paul Bennett
                    On Sun, 01 Jan 2006 05:00:30 -0500, Jefferson Wilson ... That s a word with which I ought to be familiar, but I m not. My brain keeps insisting it means either
                    Message 9 of 20 , Jan 1, 2006
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                      On Sun, 01 Jan 2006 05:00:30 -0500, Jefferson Wilson
                      <jeffwilson63@...> wrote:

                      > PM Hyperborean, Indian, and artificial languages

                      That's a word with which I ought to be familiar, but I'm not. My brain
                      keeps insisting it means either "having many trees" or "above the trees",
                      neither of which make much sense. In typing this, though, it has become
                      apparent that it might mean "from beyond the north".

                      Am I even remotely in the right territory?




                      Paul
                    • Andreas Johansson
                      ... The Hyperboreans, according to ancient geographers, were a people living in the far north, so your last interpretation is probably correct. Andreas
                      Message 10 of 20 , Jan 1, 2006
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                        Quoting Paul Bennett <paul-bennett@...>:

                        > On Sun, 01 Jan 2006 05:00:30 -0500, Jefferson Wilson
                        > <jeffwilson63@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > > PM Hyperborean, Indian, and artificial languages
                        >
                        > That's a word with which I ought to be familiar, but I'm not. My brain
                        > keeps insisting it means either "having many trees" or "above the trees",
                        > neither of which make much sense. In typing this, though, it has become
                        > apparent that it might mean "from beyond the north".
                        >
                        > Am I even remotely in the right territory?

                        The Hyperboreans, according to ancient geographers, were a people living in the
                        far north, so your last interpretation is probably correct.

                        Andreas
                      • Roger Mills
                        Paul Bennett wrote: (with snips) ... _slimmish_ I suspect. _Slimish_ books are what I found in my damp basement... My presents to myself this year were:
                        Message 11 of 20 , Jan 1, 2006
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                          Paul Bennett wrote: (with snips)
                          > I forgot to brag about my Christmas haul. a 1958 first edition of _The
                          > Decipherment Of Linear B_ by John
                          > Chadwick. It's a slimish paperback,

                          _slimmish_ I suspect. _Slimish_ books are what I found in my damp
                          basement...
                          My presents to myself this year were: Collected Poems of James Merrill, and
                          a bilingual Residencia en la tierra (all 3 in one vol.) by Pablo Neruda.

                          > Inside, the pages are tanned, but not
                          > horrifically so, considering it's a nearly 50 year old book. It smells
                          > wonderful -- that really good "old book" smell that draws you into the
                          > book and makes you feel immersed in the words. Original sale price: 95c.

                          Ho ho, I remember this from the first time 'round. It was a stunning report
                          at the time. I'm surprised a PB has held up so well. Obviously it was
                          properly stored.

                          I have a lot of 50-yr old Spanish-lang. PBs from the Colección Austral
                          (Argentina), very cheap but well-produced editions-- nary a typo ever. They
                          tended to turn yellow and brittle after a mere 10 years. The bindings
                          usually gave out after one reading.
                        • Mark J. Reed
                          I had a nice linguistic Xmas haul as well - thank you, Amazon.com wish lists. :) I got Mallory s _In Search of the Indo-Europeans: Language, Archaeology, and
                          Message 12 of 20 , Jan 1, 2006
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                            I had a nice linguistic Xmas haul as well - thank you, Amazon.com wish
                            lists. :) I got Mallory's _In Search of the Indo-Europeans: Language,
                            Archaeology, and Myth_, Boyd-Bowman's _From Latin to Romance in Sound
                            Charts_, and Keenan's _Breaking out of Beginner's Spanish_ (more of a
                            personal development thing). Not original editions or autographed or
                            even hardback, just books I wanted to read and add to my library....
                          • caeruleancentaur
                            ... I m selling a number of my books on Amazon. I sold the Mallory book several months ago. I hope it s not too self-serving to mention that I do have one
                            Message 13 of 20 , Jan 1, 2006
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                              --- In conlang@yahoogroups.com, "Mark J. Reed" <markjreed@M...> wrote:

                              >I had a nice linguistic Xmas haul as well - thank you, Amazon.com wish
                              >lists. :) I got Mallory's _In Search of the Indo-Europeans: Language,
                              >Archaeology, and Myth_,...

                              I'm selling a number of my books on Amazon. I sold the Mallory book
                              several months ago. I hope it's not too self-serving to mention that
                              I do have one more language book still unsold. It is Roy Andrew
                              Miller's "Japanese and the Other Altaic Languages." If anyone is
                              interested in it, please let me know.

                              The other books are mainly cook books and books on world religions.

                              Charlie
                              http://wiki.frath.net/user:caeruleancentaur
                            • Gary Shannon
                              ... ... Interesting coincidence. Since retiring from computer programming, I support myself selling books on Amazon. Other interesting coincidnece: I
                              Message 14 of 20 , Jan 1, 2006
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                                --- caeruleancentaur <caeruleancentaur@...>
                                wrote:

                                > --- In conlang@yahoogroups.com, "Mark J. Reed"
                                > <markjreed@M...> wrote:
                                <snip>
                                > I'm selling a number of my books on Amazon. I sold
                                > the Mallory book
                                > several months ago. I hope it's not too
                                > self-serving to mention that
                                > I do have one more language book still unsold. It
                                > is Roy Andrew
                                > Miller's "Japanese and the Other Altaic Languages."
                                > If anyone is
                                > interested in it, please let me know.

                                Interesting coincidence. Since retiring from computer
                                programming, I support myself selling books on Amazon.
                                Other interesting coincidnece: I sold a copy of "The
                                Decipherment of Linear B" about an hour ago!

                                --gary
                              • R A Brown
                                ... Certainly correct. Hyperboreoi (m. pl.) a people supposed to live in the extreme north . The noun is found in the works of Homer and of other ancient
                                Message 15 of 20 , Jan 2, 2006
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                                  Andreas Johansson wrote:
                                  > Quoting Paul Bennett <paul-bennett@...>:
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >>On Sun, 01 Jan 2006 05:00:30 -0500, Jefferson Wilson
                                  >><jeffwilson63@...> wrote:
                                  >>
                                  >>
                                  >>> PM Hyperborean, Indian, and artificial languages
                                  >>
                                  >>That's a word with which I ought to be familiar, but I'm not. My brain
                                  >>keeps insisting it means either "having many trees" or "above the trees",
                                  >>neither of which make much sense. In typing this, though, it has become
                                  >>apparent that it might mean "from beyond the north".
                                  >>
                                  >>Am I even remotely in the right territory?
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > The Hyperboreans, according to ancient geographers, were a people living in the
                                  > far north, so your last interpretation is probably correct.

                                  Certainly correct.

                                  Hyperboreoi (m. pl.) "a people supposed to live in the extreme north".
                                  The noun is found in the works of Homer and of other ancient Greek
                                  writers. It is derived thus:
                                  hyper "above, beyond" + bore- (north, north wind)* + -oi (MASC.PL)

                                  *the noun for 'north' and 'north wind' was _boreas_ (masc.)

                                  In modern times the adjective 'Hyperborean' has been applied to a group
                                  of languages spoken in northeastern Siberia.

                                  --
                                  Ray
                                  ==================================
                                  ray@...
                                  http://www.carolandray.plus.com
                                  ==================================
                                  MAKE POVERTY HISTORY
                                • Isaac Penzev
                                  ... Hmm. Aren t they more often called Paleosiberian or Paleoasian ? -- Yitzik
                                  Message 16 of 20 , Jan 2, 2006
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                                    R A Brown wrote:


                                    > In modern times the adjective 'Hyperborean' has been applied to a group
                                    > of languages spoken in northeastern Siberia.

                                    Hmm. Aren't they more often called 'Paleosiberian' or 'Paleoasian'?

                                    -- Yitzik
                                  • R A Brown
                                    ... I believe so - my source was Mario Pei The World s Chief Languages , 1949. But the Library of Congress apparently still uses the older term: PM
                                    Message 17 of 20 , Jan 2, 2006
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                                      Isaac Penzev wrote:
                                      > R A Brown wrote:
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >>In modern times the adjective 'Hyperborean' has been applied to a group
                                      >>of languages spoken in northeastern Siberia.
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > Hmm. Aren't they more often called 'Paleosiberian' or 'Paleoasian'?

                                      I believe so - my source was Mario Pei "The World's Chief Languages",
                                      1949. But the Library of Congress apparently still uses the older term:
                                      PM Hyperborean, Indian, and artificial languages

                                      In the list quoted yesterday by Jefferson Wilson there is no mention of
                                      'Paleosiberian' or 'Paleoasian'

                                      A quick Google on 'hyperborean' will soon show many different latter-day
                                      uses; I guess the terms 'Pal(a)eosiberian' and 'Pal(a)eoasian' have been
                                      adopted to avoid confusion with some of these other uses.

                                      --
                                      Ray
                                      ==================================
                                      ray@...
                                      http://www.carolandray.plus.com
                                      ==================================
                                      MAKE POVERTY HISTORY
                                    • Jörg Rhiemeier
                                      Hallo! ... Yep. Losts of crackpots using this term for all sorts of figments of their imagination, including some very unpalatable ones. And northeastern
                                      Message 18 of 20 , Jan 2, 2006
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                                        Hallo!

                                        Ray Brown wrote:

                                        > Isaac Penzev wrote:
                                        > > R A Brown wrote:
                                        > >
                                        > >
                                        > >
                                        > >>In modern times the adjective 'Hyperborean' has been applied to a group
                                        > >>of languages spoken in northeastern Siberia.
                                        > >
                                        > >
                                        > > Hmm. Aren't they more often called 'Paleosiberian' or 'Paleoasian'?
                                        >
                                        > I believe so - my source was Mario Pei "The World's Chief Languages",
                                        > 1949. But the Library of Congress apparently still uses the older term:
                                        > PM Hyperborean, Indian, and artificial languages
                                        >
                                        > In the list quoted yesterday by Jefferson Wilson there is no mention of
                                        > 'Paleosiberian' or 'Paleoasian'
                                        >
                                        > A quick Google on 'hyperborean' will soon show many different latter-day
                                        > uses; I guess the terms 'Pal(a)eosiberian' and 'Pal(a)eoasian' have been
                                        > adopted to avoid confusion with some of these other uses.

                                        Yep. Losts of crackpots using this term for all sorts of figments
                                        of their imagination, including some very unpalatable ones.

                                        And northeastern Siberia probably doesn't have the least to do
                                        with the Hyperborea of the ancients at all (where's the friendly
                                        temperate climate and all that?); IMHO, "Hyperborea" refers to
                                        pre-Celtic Britain. Which also means that the term "Hyperborean"
                                        applies better to - Albic ;-) But I will stick to the name "Albic":
                                        it is shorter, it is unambiguous, it is better.

                                        Greetings,

                                        Jörg.
                                      • Adam Walker
                                        ... Roy Andrew ... I have and read that one. It was interesting. Adam Jin xividjilud djal suñu ed falud ul Jozevu pomu instanchid ul andjelu djul Dominu
                                        Message 19 of 20 , Jan 3, 2006
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                                          --- caeruleancentaur <caeruleancentaur@...>
                                          wrote:

                                          > --- In conlang@yahoogroups.com, "Mark J. Reed"
                                          > <markjreed@M...> wrote:
                                          Roy Andrew
                                          > Miller's "Japanese and the Other Altaic Languages."
                                          > If anyone is
                                          > interested in it, please let me know.

                                          I have and read that one. It was interesting.

                                          Adam

                                          Jin xividjilud djal suñu ed falud ul Jozevu pomu instanchid ul andjelu djul Dominu sivi, ed idavi achibid jun al su sposa. Ed nun aved cuñuxud ad sivi ancha nadud jan ad ul sua huiju primodjindu ed cuamad il su numi ul Jezu.

                                          Machu 1:24-25
                                        • Andreas Johansson
                                          ... The Swedish 17th C historian Olof Rudbeck thought it refered to Scandinavia, and claimed the word was derived from Scandinavian _yverboren_ highborn . He
                                          Message 20 of 20 , Jan 3, 2006
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                                            Quoting Jörg Rhiemeier <joerg_rhiemeier@...>:

                                            > Hallo!
                                            >
                                            > Ray Brown wrote:
                                            >
                                            > > Isaac Penzev wrote:
                                            > > > R A Brown wrote:
                                            > > >
                                            > > >
                                            > > >
                                            > > >>In modern times the adjective 'Hyperborean' has been applied to a group
                                            > > >>of languages spoken in northeastern Siberia.
                                            > > >
                                            > > >
                                            > > > Hmm. Aren't they more often called 'Paleosiberian' or 'Paleoasian'?
                                            > >
                                            > > I believe so - my source was Mario Pei "The World's Chief Languages",
                                            > > 1949. But the Library of Congress apparently still uses the older term:
                                            > > PM Hyperborean, Indian, and artificial languages
                                            > >
                                            > > In the list quoted yesterday by Jefferson Wilson there is no mention of
                                            > > 'Paleosiberian' or 'Paleoasian'
                                            > >
                                            > > A quick Google on 'hyperborean' will soon show many different latter-day
                                            > > uses; I guess the terms 'Pal(a)eosiberian' and 'Pal(a)eoasian' have been
                                            > > adopted to avoid confusion with some of these other uses.
                                            >
                                            > Yep. Losts of crackpots using this term for all sorts of figments
                                            > of their imagination, including some very unpalatable ones.
                                            >
                                            > And northeastern Siberia probably doesn't have the least to do
                                            > with the Hyperborea of the ancients at all (where's the friendly
                                            > temperate climate and all that?); IMHO, "Hyperborea" refers to
                                            > pre-Celtic Britain. Which also means that the term "Hyperborean"
                                            > applies better to - Albic ;-) But I will stick to the name "Albic":
                                            > it is shorter, it is unambiguous, it is better.

                                            The Swedish 17th C historian Olof Rudbeck thought it refered to Scandinavia, and
                                            claimed the word was derived from Scandinavian _yverboren_ "highborn". He
                                            should've taken more Greek classes, but you'll still occasionally hear
                                            _yverboren_ as joking characterization of overly patriotic folks.

                                            Andreas
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