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Re: New language grammar--what needs work?

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  • Ph.D.
    ... What about sentences such as I am sitting under the chair outside the house or I walked in the mud on the road near the forest ? --Ph. D.
    Message 1 of 10 , Dec 2, 2005
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      veritosproject@... wrote:
      >
      > On 12/2/05, Jim Henry <jimhenry1973@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > OK. How would you express spatial relationships like
      > > "under", "inside", etc? Will they be marked by
      > > affixing the location or motion verb rather than adpositions
      > > on the noun phrase?
      >
      > Those would be the verbs. i.e. The phrase "I am sitting under
      > the chair" would not have a verb "to sit" , but "to sit under".

      What about sentences such as "I am sitting under the chair
      outside the house" or "I walked in the mud on the road near the
      forest" ?


      --Ph. D.
    • veritosproject@gmail.com
      Let s try those. Also never mind, verbs don t explicitly need prepositions (comefrom-INDIC-PR-1PS-GIVEN_O vancouver-OBJECT means I come from Vancouver ), but
      Message 2 of 10 , Dec 2, 2005
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        Let's try those. Also never mind, verbs don't explicitly need
        prepositions (comefrom-INDIC-PR-1PS-GIVEN_O vancouver-OBJECT means "I
        come from Vancouver"), but if needed for more detail, they can be
        used.

        Here's an example of how I morphed the English to my lang.
        I am sitting under the chair outside the house. (Initial)
        sit.indic.pr.1ps.gvo under the chair outside the house. (Take care of
        the easy stuff.)
        sit.indic.pr.1ps.gvo chair(house-outside)under.obj (Final. The
        semicolon separates the two entities, which form one noun. These, as
        written in the grammar, are parsed right to left, so we get "under (an
        outside-a-house) chair".

        Also thanks for all the help. You're whipping the initial grammar
        into shape, and it might just be useful eventually.

        Another one:
        I walked in the mud on the road near the forest.
        walk.indic.pa.1ps.gvo (in the (on the road (near the forest)) mud).obj
        walk.indic.pa.1ps.gvo mud(forest-near(road-on))on.obj

        On 12/2/05, Ph.D. <phil@...> wrote:
        > veritosproject@... wrote:
        > >
        > > On 12/2/05, Jim Henry <jimhenry1973@...> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > OK. How would you express spatial relationships like
        > > > "under", "inside", etc? Will they be marked by
        > > > affixing the location or motion verb rather than adpositions
        > > > on the noun phrase?
        > >
        > > Those would be the verbs. i.e. The phrase "I am sitting under
        > > the chair" would not have a verb "to sit" , but "to sit under".
        >
        > What about sentences such as "I am sitting under the chair
        > outside the house" or "I walked in the mud on the road near the
        > forest" ?
        >
        >
        > --Ph. D.
        >
      • Taka Tunu
        ... What about sentences such as I am sitting under the chair outside the house or I walked in the mud on the road near the forest ? ... And why not use
        Message 3 of 10 , Dec 3, 2005
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          Ph. D. wrote:

          >>>
          veritosproject@... wrote:
          >
          > On 12/2/05, Jim Henry <jimhenry1973@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > OK. How would you express spatial relationships like
          > > "under", "inside", etc? Will they be marked by
          > > affixing the location or motion verb rather than adpositions
          > > on the noun phrase?
          >
          > Those would be the verbs. i.e. The phrase "I am sitting under
          > the chair" would not have a verb "to sit" , but "to sit under".

          What about sentences such as "I am sitting under the chair
          outside the house" or "I walked in the mud on the road near the
          forest" ?
          >>>>

          And why not use nouns instead?

          "I sit @ now @ the underneath of the chair @ the outside of the house and I walk
          @ the past @ (the midst of) mud @ the (surface of) the road @ the proximity of
          the forest."

          µ.
        • veritosproject@gmail.com
          Because this is an agglutinating language. And why not use nouns instead? This isn t designed to be simple. It s an (soon-to-be)artlang, not a
          Message 4 of 10 , Dec 3, 2005
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            Because this is an agglutinating language.> And why not use nouns
            instead? This isn't designed to be simple. It's an
            (soon-to-be)artlang, not a log/eng/auxlang.
            >
            > "I sit @ now @ the underneath of the chair @ the outside of the house and I walk
            > @ the past @ (the midst of) mud @ the (surface of) the road @ the proximity of
            > the forest."
            >
            > µ.
            >
          • Taka Tunu
            ... Because this is an agglutinating language. And why not use nouns instead? This isn t designed to be simple. It s an (soon-to-be)artlang, not a
            Message 5 of 10 , Dec 4, 2005
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              veritosproject@... wrote:
              >>>>
              Because this is an agglutinating language.> And why not use nouns
              instead? This isn't designed to be simple. It's an
              (soon-to-be)artlang, not a log/eng/auxlang.
              >
              > "I sit @ now @ the underneath of the chair @ the outside of the house and I
              walk
              > @ the past @ (the midst of) mud @ the (surface of) the road @ the proximity of
              > the forest."
              >
              > µ.
              >>>>

              I was not intent on going there. Rather, I read once a book with several Papuan
              language grammars and some "agglu(tinative)native" ones had interesting
              mandatory spacial and dispositional(?) auxiliary verbs like "to stand by", "to
              lie down", "to stoop" that were mandatory with any verb and combined with space
              nouns.
              µ.
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