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music, maths and language

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  • Yahya Abdal-Aziz
    Hi all, What kind of music do L1 speakers of your conlang(s) make? What kinds of mathematics do they do? I m expecting that more than a few of you will
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 2, 2005
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      Hi all,
       
      What kind of music do L1 speakers of your conlang(s) make?  What kinds of mathematics do they do?
       
      I'm expecting that more than a few of you will already have considered these things, since I observe much mathematical, formal and programming activity going on in your messages.  And here's a link to a lay article on the universality of music, which includes reference to "the mathematical gene" that is said to underlie all three of music, maths and language -

      Regards,
      Yahya

       
    • Herman Miller
      ... I have some information on Zireen music (with words from the Yasaro language) on these sites: http://wiki.frath.net/Zireen_music
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 2, 2005
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        Yahya Abdal-Aziz wrote:
        > Hi all,
        >
        > What kind of music do L1 speakers of your conlang(s) make? What kinds
        > of mathematics do they do?
        >
        > I'm expecting that more than a few of you will already have considered
        > these things, since I observe much mathematical, formal and programming
        > activity going on in your messages. And here's a link to a lay article
        > on the universality of music, which includes reference to "the
        > mathematical gene" that is said to underlie all three of music, maths
        > and language -
        > http://cogweb.ucla.edu/ep/Music_Leutwyler_01.html

        I have some information on Zireen music (with words from the Yasaro
        language) on these sites:

        http://wiki.frath.net/Zireen_music
        http://www.io.com/~hmiller/music/zireen-music.html

        The second page uses anglicized versions of the Yasaro words, since it's
        aimed more at readers who may be interested in the music (particularly
        the sound of the tuning systems) without necessarily having any interest
        in the language. It also has a few fragments of Zireen music in
        different styles (as MIDI files retuned with pitch bends).

        The Mizarian porcupines (Oninko) use a scale of 15 steps per octave, and
        I've recently re-recorded my "Mizarian Porcupine Overture" which uses
        this scale:

        http://home.comcast.net/~teamouse/porcupine-absynth.mp3

        and I have an incomplete fragment of a Mizarian song "Yeequitch and
        Keesha" also in this scale:

        http://www.io.com/~hmiller/midi/yeequitch-keesha.mid

        There's also this fragment of Mizarian music using a 17-note scale,
        which unfortunately is only in .RA format (ugh). I probably ought to
        re-record that one of these days:

        ftp://ftp.io.com/pub/usr/hmiller/ra-archive/treek.ra

        I also have some older samples of Olaetian music:

        http://www.io.com/~hmiller/midi/krocnardsklestj.mid
        http://www.io.com/~hmiller/midi/xeyenike.mid

        (the last of which is one of the oldest things I ever wrote, way back in
        1978).
      • John Schlembach
        Off topic, but you should check out a band called Magma. Back in the 70 s they made records in a conlang that told the history of an alien race.
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 2, 2005
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          Off topic, but you should check out a band called Magma. Back in the 70's they made records in a conlang that told the history of an alien race.

          On 11/2/05, Herman Miller <hmiller@...> wrote:
          Yahya Abdal-Aziz wrote:
          > Hi all,
          >
          > What kind of music do L1 speakers of your conlang(s) make?  What kinds
          > of mathematics do they do?
          >
          > I'm expecting that more than a few of you will already have considered
          > these things, since I observe much mathematical, formal and programming
          > activity going on in your messages.  And here's a link to a lay article
          > on the universality of music, which includes reference to "the
          > mathematical gene" that is said to underlie all three of music, maths
          > and language -
          > http://cogweb.ucla.edu/ep/Music_Leutwyler_01.html

          I have some information on Zireen music (with words from the Yasaro
          language) on these sites:

          http://wiki.frath.net/Zireen_music
          http://www.io.com/~hmiller/music/zireen-music.html

          The second page uses anglicized versions of the Yasaro words, since it's
          aimed more at readers who may be interested in the music (particularly
          the sound of the tuning systems) without necessarily having any interest
          in the language. It also has a few fragments of Zireen music in
          different styles (as MIDI files retuned with pitch bends).

          The Mizarian porcupines (Oninko) use a scale of 15 steps per octave, and
          I've recently re-recorded my "Mizarian Porcupine Overture" which uses
          this scale:

          http://home.comcast.net/~teamouse/porcupine-absynth.mp3

          and I have an incomplete fragment of a Mizarian song "Yeequitch and
          Keesha" also in this scale:

          http://www.io.com/~hmiller/midi/yeequitch-keesha.mid

          There's also this fragment of Mizarian music using a 17-note scale,
          which unfortunately is only in .RA format (ugh). I probably ought to
          re-record that one of these days:

          ftp://ftp.io.com/pub/usr/hmiller/ra-archive/treek.ra

          I also have some older samples of Olaetian music:

          http://www.io.com/~hmiller/midi/krocnardsklestj.mid
          http://www.io.com/~hmiller/midi/xeyenike.mid

          (the last of which is one of the oldest things I ever wrote, way back in
          1978).

        • John Schlembach
          Well, the Aranin s music would be mistaken for noise by most people. It s very similar to Tuvan vocal singing. Very low, slow, and droning, almost dirge like.
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 2, 2005
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            Well, the Aranin's music would be mistaken for noise by most people. It's very similar to Tuvan vocal singing. Very low, slow, and droning, almost dirge like. The concept of mathematics is not native to them, it's one of the many influences that the Koro foisted off before they disappeared.
             
            I hope that helps.

             
            On 11/3/05, John Schlembach <bachalon@...> wrote:
            Off topic, but you should check out a band called Magma. Back in the 70's they made records in a conlang that told the history of an alien race.


            On 11/2/05, Herman Miller <hmiller@...> wrote:
            Yahya Abdal-Aziz wrote:
            > Hi all,
            >
            > What kind of music do L1 speakers of your conlang(s) make?  What kinds
            > of mathematics do they do?
            >
            > I'm expecting that more than a few of you will already have considered
            > these things, since I observe much mathematical, formal and programming
            > activity going on in your messages.  And here's a link to a lay article
            > on the universality of music, which includes reference to "the
            > mathematical gene" that is said to underlie all three of music, maths
            > and language -
            > http://cogweb.ucla.edu/ep/Music_Leutwyler_01.html

            I have some information on Zireen music (with words from the Yasaro
            language) on these sites:

            http://wiki.frath.net/Zireen_music
            http://www.io.com/~hmiller/music/zireen-music.html

            The second page uses anglicized versions of the Yasaro words, since it's
            aimed more at readers who may be interested in the music (particularly
            the sound of the tuning systems) without necessarily having any interest
            in the language. It also has a few fragments of Zireen music in
            different styles (as MIDI files retuned with pitch bends).

            The Mizarian porcupines (Oninko) use a scale of 15 steps per octave, and
            I've recently re-recorded my "Mizarian Porcupine Overture" which uses
            this scale:

            http://home.comcast.net/~teamouse/porcupine-absynth.mp3

            and I have an incomplete fragment of a Mizarian song "Yeequitch and
            Keesha" also in this scale:

            http://www.io.com/~hmiller/midi/yeequitch-keesha.mid

            There's also this fragment of Mizarian music using a 17-note scale,
            which unfortunately is only in .RA format (ugh). I probably ought to
            re-record that one of these days:

            ftp://ftp.io.com/pub/usr/hmiller/ra-archive/treek.ra

            I also have some older samples of Olaetian music:

            http://www.io.com/~hmiller/midi/krocnardsklestj.mid
            http://www.io.com/~hmiller/midi/xeyenike.mid

            (the last of which is one of the oldest things I ever wrote, way back in
            1978).


          • Dennis Paul Himes
            ... I d like to ask a more specific question along those lines. What factor times two pi has its own morpheme in your languages? In English, of course, it s
            Message 5 of 5 , Nov 4, 2005
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              Yahya Abdal-Aziz <yahya@...> wrote:
              >
              > What kind of music do L1 speakers of your conlang(s) make? What kinds of
              > mathematics do they do?

              I'd like to ask a more specific question along those lines. What
              factor times two pi has its own morpheme in your languages? In English, of
              course, it's 1/2. In Gladilatian it's 1; "ryt" is "two pi". I haven't
              decided yet for Seezzitonian, but I think it's going to be 1 as well.

              ============================================================================

              Dennis Paul Himes <> himes@...
              http://home.cshore.com/himes/dennis.htm
              Gladilatian page: http://home.cshore.com/himes/glad/lang.htm
              Seezzitonian page: http://home.cshore.com/himes/umuto/lang.htm

              Disclaimer: "True, I talk of dreams; which are the children of an idle
              brain, begot of nothing but vain fantasy; which is as thin of substance as
              the air." - Romeo & Juliet, Act I Scene iv Verse 96-99
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