Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

CHAT: Thanksgiving

Expand Messages
  • Thomas Wier
    ... It also customarily includes yams, cranberries, and stuffing made of cornbread. Curiously, it is not certain that the Pilgrims ate turkey in 1621, since
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 1, 2005
      > The only thing I have learnt in
      > English lessons is that on Thanksgiving, you eat Turkey. :-/

      It also customarily includes yams, cranberries, and stuffing
      made of cornbread. Curiously, it is not certain that the Pilgrims
      ate turkey in 1621, since in the 17th century, "turkey" meant any sort
      of wild fowl. They certainly did eat venison, though.

      > However, the day called "Erntedank" ("Harvest thank") is not
      > celebrated as it is in Northern America, it's -- as I said
      > above -- only a holiday celebrated in church actually.

      Actually, FYI, the uniform practice of celebrating Thanksgiving
      across most of anglophone North America is quite recent.
      Until late in the 19th century, Thanksgiving was considered
      a purely local New England holiday. In fact, one 19th century
      Texas governor famously refused to declare a special Fall holiday
      of Thanksgiving to the Almighty on the grounds that it was a
      "damned Yankee institution", thus ipso facto not a practice to
      be followed, and because Texans already celebrated their own day
      of Thanksgiving on 2 March, which is also Texas Independence Day.
      (He did so perhaps ironically: the very first Christian feast of
      Thanksgiving in North America was celebrated in Texas on
      23 May 1541 by Coronado after his men found food while wandering
      in the Llano Estacado.) At any rate, even far into the twentieth
      century various state governors issued proclamations of Thanksgiving
      on different dates, and it wasn't until 1942 that Congress actually
      legislated a uniform federal date for the holiday. By custom,
      the states follow this federal lead, but they are not legally obliged
      to do so; Texas did not change over to the new Fall date until 1956.

      ==========================================================================
      Thomas Wier "I find it useful to meet my subjects personally,
      Dept. of Linguistics because our secret police don't get it right
      University of Chicago half the time." -- octogenarian Sheikh Zayed of
      1010 E. 59th Street Abu Dhabi, to a French reporter.
      Chicago, IL 60637
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.