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A unified plan for Minza colors

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  • Herman Miller
    I ve been revising the Minza color system. Originally, the colors were borrowed from Lindiga, which uses a decimal system based on the hue of a color in a
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 4 7:27 PM
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      I've been revising the Minza color system. Originally, the colors were
      borrowed from Lindiga, which uses a decimal system based on the hue of a
      color in a paint program. I picked 10 equally spaced hues and used these
      to define the basic colors. But I want to include the Zireen colors also
      in Minza, and Zireen color vision is very different from human color
      vision. I've been ignoring the differences, but I realized that what I
      really need is a system based on the perceived wavelength of light. I
      played around with a couple of options and settled on a logarithmic
      scale, dividing the range from 369 nm to 738 nm into 8 equal steps.

      738 nm infrared
      675 nm (deep red)
      621 nm red
      569 nm yellow
      522 nm bluish green
      479 nm blue
      439 nm violet
      403 nm (deep violet)
      369 nm ultraviolet

      That seemed reasonably good, but I didn't like the bluish green as a
      basic color. So I subdivided the red-to-violet range to get a more
      reasonable green.

      621 nm red (nuxči)
      595 nm orange (vezi)
      569 nm yellow (kirvi)
      545 nm green (zerđi)
      522 nm bluish green
      500 nm turquoise (šilgi)
      479 nm blue (lambi)
      459 nm indigo (điki)
      439 nm violet (fildi)

      That turned out to be a nicer green. Now I have the four basic human
      colors (red, green, yellow, and blue) plus orange, and the three basic
      Zireen colors that are visible to humans (yellow, turquoise, and
      indigo). If I arrange these in a circle, and add magenta opposite green,
      then each of the four basic human colors has a complementary color. I
      started putting together a chart:

      http://www.io.com/~hmiller/png/minza-colors.png

      That "bluish green" color is too close to green and turquoise to be of
      much use, but it makes a good complementary color for "deep red", which
      I identified with the Minza color "mryöni" (maroon). Besides, Zireen are
      more sensitive to color differences in the green region, so it's useful
      to have a word for that bluish-green color. I also added "ligwi"
      (yellow-green) as a complement for "fildi" (violet).

      The "turquoise" color at 500 nm isn't quite the right wavelength for the
      Zireen color, but it's close enough (there's no point filling the gap
      between "bluish-green" and "turquoise" with yet another similar-looking
      color).
    • Jörg Rhiemeier
      Hallo! ... This is an interesting approach, using a physical definition of colours and reconciling the very different colour spaces of two different spaces
      Message 2 of 5 , Jul 5 7:43 AM
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        Hallo!

        Herman Miller wrote:

        > I've been revising the Minza color system. Originally, the colors were
        > borrowed from Lindiga, which uses a decimal system based on the hue of a
        > color in a paint program. I picked 10 equally spaced hues and used these
        > to define the basic colors. But I want to include the Zireen colors also
        > in Minza, and Zireen color vision is very different from human color
        > vision. I've been ignoring the differences, but I realized that what I
        > really need is a system based on the perceived wavelength of light. I
        > played around with a couple of options and settled on a logarithmic
        > scale, dividing the range from 369 nm to 738 nm into 8 equal steps.
        >
        > [more stuff snup]
        >
        > http://www.io.com/~hmiller/png/minza-colors.png
        >
        > [...]

        This is an interesting approach, using a physical definition of
        colours and reconciling the very different colour spaces of two
        different spaces with each other. Well done!

        Greetings,

        Jörg.
      • Ingmar Roerdinkholder
        The Minza colour system is very interesting, but how did you get the names of the colours? I thought I recognized some degenerated forms here. But maybe it s
        Message 3 of 5 , Jul 5 10:28 AM
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          The Minza colour system is very interesting, but how did you get the names
          of the colours? I thought I recognized some "degenerated" forms here. But
          maybe it's just my Dutch ear ;-)

          d-iki < indigo; Dutch degenerated pronunciation would be["Indikou]>~>d-iki?
          fildi < violet; Dutch <violet> can be pronounced [fi@"lEt] ~> fildi?
          kirvi < yellow; Dutch <geel>, older <geluw> ["Xe:lyw] ~> kirvi?
          zerd-i< green; Slavonic <zelony> etc ~> zerd-i?
          nuxc^i< red; German <nuszig> nutty, nut-like ~> nuxc^i?


          Ingmar




          >
          >621 nm red (nuxc^i)
          >595 nm orange (vezi)
          >569 nm yellow (kirvi)
          >545 nm green (zerd-i)
          >522 nm bluish green
          >500 nm turquoise (s^ilgi)
          >479 nm blue (lambi)
          >459 nm indigo (d-iki)
          >439 nm violet (fildi)
          >
          >That turned out to be a nicer green. Now I have the four basic human
          >colors (red, green, yellow, and blue) plus orange, and the three basic
          >Zireen colors that are visible to humans (yellow, turquoise, and
          >indigo). If I arrange these in a circle, and add magenta opposite green,
          >then each of the four basic human colors has a complementary color. I
          >started putting together a chart:
          >
        • Herman Miller
          ... The basic Minza words for human colors are from Lindiga (http://www.io.com/~hmiller/lang/Lindiga/colors.html), which used a lot of distorted words from
          Message 4 of 5 , Jul 5 5:52 PM
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            Ingmar Roerdinkholder wrote:
            > The Minza colour system is very interesting, but how did you get the names
            > of the colours? I thought I recognized some "degenerated" forms here. But
            > maybe it's just my Dutch ear ;-)
            >
            > d-iki < indigo; Dutch degenerated pronunciation would be["Indikou]>~>d-iki?
            > fildi < violet; Dutch <violet> can be pronounced [fi@"lEt] ~> fildi?
            > kirvi < yellow; Dutch <geel>, older <geluw> ["Xe:lyw] ~> kirvi?
            > zerd-i< green; Slavonic <zelony> etc ~> zerd-i?
            > nuxc^i< red; German <nuszig> nutty, nut-like ~> nuxc^i?

            The basic Minza words for human colors are from Lindiga
            (http://www.io.com/~hmiller/lang/Lindiga/colors.html), which used a lot
            of distorted words from other languages in its original version. The
            word for "indigo" is indeed a distorted version of "indigo", through
            Lindiga "ntiki"; initial "nt-" in Lindiga, which came to be pronounced
            [ndZ] when followed by "i", was systematically borrowed as [dZ]
            (d-stroke) in Minza. "Fildi" is also from "violet", through the Lindiga
            word "virlti".

            "Red" is actually closer to Dutch "rood"; Spanish "rojo" and German
            "rot" both contributed to the Lindiga word "rnuchti" (o -> u and r -> n`
            are not uncommon changes in Lindiga borrowings). Palatalization in
            Lindiga caused the final "t" to be pronounced as [tS].

            "Green" was originally "werrti" in Lindiga (clearly related to Italian
            "verdi", Spanish "verde", etc.), but I changed the initial w- to z- to
            make the borrowing less obvious. It's very likely that my association of
            "z-" with "green" is derived from Slavic languages.
          • Herman Miller
            ... Thanks! It seems to be coming together pretty well so far. I ve been putting together a page with illustrations that show how the human colors are
            Message 5 of 5 , Jul 10 6:06 PM
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              Jörg Rhiemeier wrote:

              > This is an interesting approach, using a physical definition of
              > colours and reconciling the very different colour spaces of two
              > different spaces with each other. Well done!

              Thanks! It seems to be coming together pretty well so far.

              I've been putting together a page with illustrations that show how the
              human colors are associated with spectral colors as perceived by
              Mizarians, Zireen, and Sangari. I also realized that most of the
              non-spectral colors of the Zireen system can be represented as
              complementary colors, which means that I can use dominant wavelength
              (positive or negative) as the unifying concept for all colors except
              those weird Zireen colors at the poles of the hue sphere (which have no
              single dominant wavelength, but a combination of two).

              http://www.io.com/~hmiller/lang/Minza/Minza-colors.html
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