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Re: Etymology of "Woman" Comic

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  • Julia "Schnecki" Simon
    Hello! ... If that s the story I m thinking of (it was called The Wife s Story or The Wife s Tale or something like that), then yes, the author should have
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 2, 2005
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      Hello!

      On 6/2/05, Andreas Johansson <andjo@...> wrote:
      >
      > A comedy fantasy piece I read years ago had a "wereman" in it; a wolf that
      > turned into a man at full moon. I've always wondered if the author was aware of
      > the etymology.

      If that's the story I'm thinking of (it was called "The Wife's Story"
      or "The Wife's Tale" or something like that), then yes, the author
      should have been aware of the etymology, what with her being Ursula K.
      LeGuin, daughter of famous anthropologist/linguist Alfred L.
      Kroeber... :-)

      On the other hand, it wasn't a comedic story IIRC, so we may be
      thinking of different stories after all.

      Incidentally, there's a funny German poem (by Christian Morgenstern, I
      think) about a werewolf who wants to find out how to inflect the word
      "werewolf" correctly. Since the German word for a werewolf is
      _Werwolf_ and _wer_ happens to be the interrogative pronoun "who", his
      teacher starts inflecting: _der Werwolf_ ("the who-wolf"), _des
      Weswolfes_ ("the whose-wolf's"), _dem Wemwolf_ ("the whom-wolf",
      dative), _den Wenwolf_ ("the whom-wolf", accusative). The werewolf is
      devastated when he learns that you can't form a plural this way -- how
      is that possible? He has a family, after all, so how can there be no
      grammatical way to *talk* about several werewolves at once if it's
      totally possible to *encounter* several werewolves at once? ;-)

      Regards,
      Julia

      --
      Julia Simon (Schnecki) -- Sprachen-Freak vom Dienst
      _@" schnecki AT iki DOT fi / helicula AT gmail DOT com "@_
      si hortum in bybliotheca habes, deerit nihil
      (M. Tullius Cicero)
    • darkmoonman
      ... http://www.christian-morgenstern.de/humor/galgen/gl51.html LOL. Nice poem - in the German as well as some of the translations.
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 3, 2005
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        > Incidentally, there's a funny German poem (by Christian Morgenstern, I
        > think) about a werewolf who wants to find out how to inflect the word
        > "werewolf" correctly.

        http://www.christian-morgenstern.de/humor/galgen/gl51.html

        LOL. Nice poem - in the German as well as some of the translations.
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