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Re: Advanced English to become official!

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  • Pascal A. Kramm
    ... You could use a hyphen (mid-guard) or an apostrophe (mid guard). ... Why would you want to write vowels which are not pronounced in the first place?
    Message 1 of 47 , Apr 2, 2005
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      On Fri, 1 Apr 2005 17:43:30 -0800, David J. Peterson <dedalvs@...> wrote:

      >I was just looking over your page. A couple questions:
      >
      >-How would AE differentiate between the [dZ] in a word like
      >"language" and the "dg" in a made-up word like "midguard"?

      You could use a hyphen (mid-guard) or an apostrophe (mid'guard).

      >-Same goes for something like "missionary" and "vishnu",
      >the first with a reduced vowel between the [S] and [n], and
      >the latter without?

      Why would you want to write vowels which are not pronounced in the first
      place? Ideally, you don't, so I left them out as much as possible.

      >-What is the difference between the onset of "gem" and the
      >onset of "joy"?

      Phonetically none, but I chose dg and dj to stay closer to the original
      spelling. dj would only be used for words originally spelled with j,
      otherwise dg is used.

      >-Curious: Why did you use "ae" for schwa, rather than "a",
      >when you use "a" for carrot [V]?

      I chose this to distinct between normal a and schwa. The carrot [V] is just
      a short a, so I wrote it as such.

      >-According to your chart, you use "a" for [V] and [A]/[Q].
      >Does this mean "cot" and "cut" would be spelled the same?

      Since [Q] is closer to a than to o, I chose to write it with a.
      Even if I had chosen "o", there would be some other words with then
      identical spelling.

      >-Not familiar with British pronunciation. Does the "i" in
      >"technique" rhyme with the "i" in "bit" or the "ee" in "beet"?

      It's a French word. The i is long, as in beet.

      >-Curious: Why no consonant for the (inter)dental fricatives?
      >There are lots of minimal pairs: dare/there/their; die/thy; tie/thigh;
      >tin/thin, etc.

      You'll have to take into consideration the vast amount of non-native
      speakers, which now outnumber the native speakers. Most of them don't have a
      th, so I thought it better to axe it.

      >-Also, "s" is *always* voiced before a vowel? So "sue" and "zoo"
      >are pronounced the same: [zu]?

      Basically yes. A distinction would be unneccessary here.
      Everyone should be able to understand "Sue goes to the zoo" regardless is
      the s is voiced or not.

      >-Oh, interesting. Do you pronounce "v" and "w" the same?

      Yes. The difference is too small to warrant separate letters, so get rid of
      a superfluent letter :D

      >Neat stuff!

      Thanks :)

      --
      Pascal A. Kramm, author of:
      Shinsei: http://www.choton.org/shinsei/
      Intergermansk: http://www.choton.org/ig/
      Chatiga: http://www.choton.org/chatiga/
      Choton: http://www.choton.org
      Ichwara Prana: http://www.choton.org/ichwara/
      Skälansk: http://www.choton.org/sk/
      Advanced English: http://www.choton.org/ae/
    • Andreas Johansson
      ... There s variants of English that ve got it (phonetically) in words like girl [g@:l]. Andreas
      Message 47 of 47 , Apr 6, 2005
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        Quoting Paul Bennett <paul-bennett@...>:

        > On Mon, 04 Apr 2005 10:17:37 -0400, Christopher Wright
        > <dhasenan@...> wrote:
        >
        > > Schwa is a reduced vowel;
        >
        > Schwa is a mid central vowel. In English, a short schwa is the realisation
        > of several reduced vowels.
        >
        > > in spectrograms,
        > > you always tell it because it's extremely short
        >
        > Not always so. /@:/ exists in the Real World, including in Sinhalese.

        There's variants of English that've got it (phonetically) in words like "girl"
        [g@:l].

        Andreas
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