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Re: Intergermansk - Pizza packaging text :D

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  • Mike Ellis
    ... The first and only place I ve ever heard champignon in English was on Iron Chef, where the dubbed-over English commentators use champignon mushrooms
    Message 1 of 37 , Jan 31, 2005
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      B. Garcia <madyaas@...> wrote:

      >I came across "champignon" via its Spanish version "Champiñón", and
      >always thought that that was a funny Spanish word, because it looks so
      >French (of course, it is). But this is the first time i've heard
      >Champignon used in a context outside of French food (meaning as a
      >perfectly fine English word).

      The first and only place I've ever heard 'champignon' in English was on Iron
      Chef, where the dubbed-over English commentators use "champignon mushrooms"
      for the white/button mushrooms (they use a lot of more exotic shrooms on
      that show). Maybe in the original Japanese, "champinyon" or something
      similar is used for that mushroom.

      >... The common English name for A. bisporus
      >in the United States is "Button Mushroom" when sold immature, and
      >Portabella/Portobello/Crimini when the cap is allowed to expand out
      >and mature a bit. It is also called "common white mushroom" but most
      >people here call them "Button Mushrooms".

      I thought a crimini was an immature portobello (criminis're small but
      brown); as for the mature version of button, I've only ever seen that a few
      times in Chinese supermarkets, labelled "moon-bello".

      M
    • Thomas R. Wier
      From: Pascal A. Kramm ... And in fact most educated English speakers *do* know these words; that s why they have orders of magnitude, up
      Message 37 of 37 , Feb 4, 2005
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        From: "Pascal A. Kramm" <pkramm@...>
        > > Some academic- and editorial-page-speak:
        > > Zeitgeist 1.6M
        > > Weltanschauung 450k
        > > Same comment applies.
        >
        > Well, those are words an educated person should know :)

        And in fact most educated English speakers *do* know these words; that's
        why they have orders of magnitude, up to 100 times, more hits than
        "champignon". Again, it doesn't prove that "champignon" is a word educated,
        even hyperliterate, English speakers are likely to know.

        ==========================================================================
        Thomas Wier "I find it useful to meet my subjects personally,
        Dept. of Linguistics because our secret police don't get it right
        University of Chicago half the time." -- octogenarian Sheikh Zayed of
        1010 E. 59th Street Abu Dhabi, to a French reporter.
        Chicago, IL 60637
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