Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: my grammar

Expand Messages
  • Thomas R. Wier
    From: Rodlox R ... I think this varies from culture to culture. There s a well-known anthropological distinction between positive face
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 2, 2005
      From: Rodlox R <rodlox@...>
      > but from what I've heard, most people appreciate it when someone (at least
      > initially) speaks to them in their (the former, not the latter)'s own
      > language, rather than their (the latter, not the former)'s own language.

      I think this varies from culture to culture. There's a well-known
      anthropological distinction between positive face (associative
      politeness) and negative "face" (impositional politeness).
      It is my understanding that although all cultures seek to optimize
      both kinds of face, when there is a conflict some cultures maximize
      one kind over the other. In America, the tendency seems to be to
      consider telling people what language to speak very rude -- at least,
      that's my experience; I associate it with racists and antiimmigrant
      opinions. In my experience, continental Europeans tend to take the
      opposite stance, that making no effort to speak the others' language
      is very rude. Thus, Americans would seem more to seek to preserve
      negative face, while Europeans more positive face, with respect to
      this issue at least (the opposite is the case with respect to other
      cultural phenomena).

      ==========================================================================
      Thomas Wier "I find it useful to meet my subjects personally,
      Dept. of Linguistics because our secret police don't get it right
      University of Chicago half the time." -- octogenarian Sheikh Zayed of
      1010 E. 59th Street Abu Dhabi, to a French reporter.
      Chicago, IL 60637
    • Chris Bates
      ... THis applies to external languages. The history of France (ongoing), Spain (during the Franco years especially), and countless other european countries
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 2, 2005
        > In my experience, continental Europeans tend to take the
        >opposite stance, that making no effort to speak the others' language
        >is very rude.
        >
        THis applies to external languages. The history of France (ongoing),
        Spain (during the Franco years especially), and countless other european
        countries show though that the dominant cultural/ethic group isn't above
        forcing all the other internal language speakers to use their language
        for official purposes at least though. Apparently politeness doesn't
        extend to your fellow countrymen. I personally think the French policies
        that pretty much killed off Provencal and are driving the French Basque
        dialects into extinction are completely awful. *sigh* Unfortunately
        historically Britain has been as bad, and it's probably the fault of the
        policies imposed by English dominated governments that Gaelic and Scots
        especially are in such bad shape. Welsh suffered, but it isn't quite as
        close to extinction as the Scottish languages.
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.