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199227Re: Some Antic Space

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  • Roger Mills
    Oct 22, 2013
      "sarcasm" looks to be of Greek ancestry, and "irony" I suspect is Latin, though maybe a translation of a Greek term...but I'm just guessing. These things certainly existed in classical lit. Look them up in a good etymological dictionary!!!



      ________________________________
      From: Brian Woodward <alarjac3@...>
      To: CONLANG@...
      Sent: Tuesday, October 22, 2013 3:17 PM
      Subject: Re: Some Antic Space


      I'm looking more for words like "sarcasm" or "irony". Words that describe that type of dialogue, not the words that are used in that type of dialogue. I'm not so sure I'm being clear. Sorry.

      Brian


      > Den 22/10/2013 kl. 08.57 skrev taliesin the storyteller <taliesin-conlang@...>:
      >
      >> On 2013-10-22 02:02, Brian Woodward wrote:
      >> In a feeble attempt to grow my conlang's vocabulary I'm working on irony,
      >> sarcasm, and rhetoric. I'm looking for suggestions of words in English that
      >> might be involved with this semantic space. I would also appreciate words
      >> from other languages (nat or con) that relate to this semantic space,
      >> however, if a non-English word is presented I ask that an explanation of
      >> its meaning be definitively extrapolated.
      >
      > For sarcasm, look at adverbs.
      >
      > Sarcasm: Affirming and agreeing words like "indeed", "certainly",
      > "absolutely", "definitely", "of course", "naturally", "obviously" etc.
      >
      > Some Norwegian contenders here are "selvsagt", SELF+SAID, which means,
      > approximately, "of course" and "nemlig", which affirms.
      >
      > Taruven only has "keigah" for this job so far.
      >
      >
      > t.
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