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199209Re: Derivational verbs for my catfolk language

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  • Austin Blanton
    Oct 20, 2013
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      Duly noted. Thank you. I am still learning all of the terminology and formatting.

      Sent from my iPad

      > On Oct 19, 2013, at 1:00 AM, Siva Kalyan <sivakalyan.princeton@...> wrote:
      >
      > A minor comment: The usual way of writing infixes is to surround them with angle brackets, thus: f<in>ix (if you'll excuse the pun).
      >
      > On 19 October 2013 at 16:00:01, Austin Blanton (marbleboy10@...) wrote:
      >
      > I'm not sure how to go about adding my replies to specific paragraphs, so I'll try to make it all explicit here.
      >
      > Yes, the word for cloth and fur is a parallel to our term, mostly because of some worldbuilding I'm working on now where certain ideas/places appear throughout time. And I see your point with how it can be unclear, but you are on the mark with Kh being a fricative, and the K a stop. It has an Arabic feel to it, you might have noticed.
      >
      > As for using vowels in my "consonant roots", I suppose I used the wrong terms actually. Siva was correct in surmising that it was more correctly a biliteral root. It was inspired by the consonant roots of Semitic languages.
      >
      > The capitalization was simply to make it clear which was the infix for the derived verbs. Rather than putting an -ing to make it a verbal noun, they have these special infixes. I haven't worked out the strict rules for them yet, as I am still working with how it sounds. The same goes with the verb meanings. As I develop more, I can always go back and see if such parallels really make sense. Thank you for the feedback. I really appreciate it.
      >>> On Oct 18, 2013, at 7:24 PM, Alex Fink <000024@...> wrote:
      >>>
      >>> On Thu, 17 Oct 2013 13:31:17 -0400, Austin Blanton <marbleboy10@...> wrote:
      >>>
      >>> Hello. After toying around with how the language might sound, I finally have some words and grammar made out. The first is a set of derivational verbs, that is verbs formed from nouns by way of an infix between the consonant stems.
      >>
      >> As Roger says, it's difficult to comment on this as a system 'cause the examples here aren't enough to see what patterns you actually have in mind. If you don't want to write up a description on the abstract level, could you either give more examples exactly parallel to these ones, or at least as close as possible?
      >>
      >>> In my language, certain strings of consonants work as stems for a particular idea, or group,of ideas. Take these for example:
      >>>
      >>> Khájmo: kh-a-jm-o (cloth seller) the sounds kh and jm are the stems.
      >>> Khájmir: kh-a-jm-ir (cloth, wool, fur)
      >>
      >> For a cat people I'd expect "fur" to be a primary sense of whatever the usual word for it is; body parts usually are. Do they see cloth garments as (metaphorically) a kind of fur? [And is this borrowed from "cashmere"?]
      >>
      >>> Koza: k-o-z-a (cloak) Two things happen here. First, the soft K becomes hard in front of an O, and secondly, the jm sound becomes a Z sound in from of an A. But this is also a bit of an irregularity.
      >>
      >> I don't know whether you've studied any phonetics, but terms like "hard" and "soft" are notoriously difficult to make anything certain out of. I'd guess your _kh_ is a fricative and your _k_ a stop, but...? And if _jm_ is supposed to be just *one* sound (as opposed to two), I can't guess what it is.
      >>
      >>> Now that we have the idea of consonant stems/strings down, let us apply that to derived verbs. Look at these examples following the stem pattern of mi-zi
      >>
      >> _Mi-zi_ doesn't appear to be made purely of consonants; I thought you said your stems were made of consonants above.
      >>
      >>> Miozi: mi-o-zi (reflection)
      >>> Midroji: mi-DRO-ji (to be reflective, both in brilliance or in terms of pensive thought)
      >>
      >> All else being equal, if your cat people's culture developed in isolation from ours they are likely to use different metaphors than we do. Perhaps they have a different metaphor for "think pensively"? E.g. just of the verbs below, "look through" and "stir" seem to me at least as plausible as "reflect [light]" for meanings that could be metaphorically extended to "think pensively".
      >>
      >>> Mizir: mi-zi-r (mirror)
      >>> Mitizír: mi-TI-zi-r (to look through, like a lens or telescope)
      >>>
      >>> Miája: mi-a-ja (mother)
      >>> Miápsha: mi-AP-sh-a (To mother, care for, or adopt)
      >>>
      >>> Miojo: mi-o-j-o (river)
      >>> Miajlá: mi-a-j-LA (to flow, or to stir) La is actually a suffix rather than an infix. It also tends to change O sounds to A's. While orthographically similar to the word for mother, the stress is different. But they all some from the legend of the River Mother, which is also largely responsible for the existence of this string to begin with.
      >>
      >> What does capitalisation mean here? Are the four words above based on the same stem; if so, does the stem have a meaning of its own?
      >>
      >>> In a sentence:
      >>> Kepe miajlá. Literally: To make flow, used when saying to stir, or pour.
      >>
      >> That's a perfectly reasonable construct. But it doesn't seem like a sentence to me; it seems to just be a phrasal verb of some sort, probably an analytic causative.
      >>
      >> Alex
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