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Reparations

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  • Stacy Wade Harris II
    =================================================================== 62nd Congress 2nd Session S. 4652 IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES January 18, 1912 Mr.
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 1, 2003
      ===================================================================

      62nd Congress

      2nd Session

      S. 4652


      IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES

      January 18, 1912 Mr. Swanson introduced the following bill; which was read twice and referred to the Committee on Claims


      A BILL

      For the relief of certain Confederate officers for improper and illegal injuries inflicted.


      Whereas upon the eighteenth day of June, eighteen hundred and sixty-four, upon the demand of Major Gen. J. G. Foster, commanding the Union forces of the Dept. of the South, fifty Confederate officers were sent to him by the order of Mjr. Gen. Halleck, United States Army, for the purpose of retaliation, the said Mjr. Gen. Foster, assuming from certain correspondence between him and Mjr. Gen. Sam Jones, of the Confederate Army, that certain Union officers held as prisoners of war in the city of Charleston, SC, were so located in said city that they were in danger of being injured from the explosion of shells fired from Batteries Waggoner, Gregg, and other land batteries, and from the United States fleet shelling the aforesaid city; and

      Whereas, after mutual explanation between the aforesaid United States and Confederate generals, the said misunderstanding resulted in the exchange of the fifty Confederate officers sent to Mjr. Gen. Foster, as aforesaid, for an equal number of United States officers; and

      Whereas, notwithstanding after said explanation and mutual exchange, together with evidence that the facts charged were false, the said Gen. Foster again called for six hundred other Confederate officers of different ranks, who were being held as prisoners of war at Ft. DE, to be sent to Morris Island as subjects for special retaliation, notwithstanding no charges were made against them other than prisoners of war captured in battle. By order of Mjr. Gen. Halleck, United States Army, on the twentieth day of August, eighteen hundred and sixty-four, the said six hundred Confederate officers were placed aboard the steamer Crescent at Ft. DE, to be transported to Morris Island, SC. The capacity of the steamer was inadequate for such a number; and all being required to remain below deck,

      the suffering from heat and filth and thirst of water was unbearable, and the voyage which should have been made in three days was lengthened out to eighteen days, so that upon arrival at Morris Island they were in a famished condition. Here they were confined from the ninth day of September, eighteen hundred and sixty four, to the twentieth day of November in a stockade built between Batteries Greg and Waggoner of the Union forces of Morris Island, with no protection from the burning rays of the sun save small fly tents and within immediate range of the fire of the guns from the Confederate batteries replying to the bombarding of the city of Charleston, whilst also endangered by the premature bursting of shells fired from the Union batteries immediately over their heads. The daily rations issued during this term of forty-two days consisted of four hard-tack Army crackers, frequently wormy; one ounce of fat pickled pork and half a pint of bean soup, alternated at times with half a pint of mush made from meal that was old and wormy; and the only drinking water was impure, being obtained from wells dug in the sand upon which the stockade was located; and

      Whereas, also on the twentieth day of November, eighteen hundred and sixty-four, the said six hundred Confederate officers were removed from the stockade and transported to Ft. Pulaski, GA, where they were assigned to quarter in the cold, damp casemates, without fire or blankets to protect them from the cold blasts of winter. After some weeks intervened, two hundred of the number were sent to Hilton Head, SC, to relieve the crowded condition of the fort, which was telling upon their constitutions. Again the specious plea of retaliation was resorted to without any alleged ground as before and an order was given that each daily ration should be ten ounces of rotten corn meal only, which, when baked in a cake, constituted the entire food for a day, and to this was added an ample supply of cucumber and onion pickle, which, if eaten, only increased the pangs of hunger. This was the sole and entire rations upon which those six hundred officers were compelled to subsist for sixty five consecutive days; and

      Whereas this treatment of said Confederate officers, against whom no charges were made other than recognized prisoners of war, was unjustifiable and contrary to all the acknowledged rights of belligerency and without a precedent as an established principle in civilized warfare: Therefore

      Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United states of America in Congress assembled, that the Treasurer of the United States is hereby ordered and directed to pay each survivor of the six hundred aforesaid officers and to the legal heirs of the deceased officers the sum of five thousand dollars each, as damages and reparation for the acts aforesaid.

      __________________

      Stacy Wade Harris II
      Franklin County , North Carolina


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Samuel Hain
      Oh, how the mighty have fallen! Now it is blacks who demand reparations from Whites for the evils suffered during slavery and segregation. Question to said
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 2, 2003
        Oh, how the mighty have fallen! Now it is blacks who demand
        reparations from Whites for the evils suffered during slavery and
        segregation.
        Question to said blacks: Have you examined the standard of living in
        sub- Saharan Africa as well as the rate of AIDS infection? You have
        benefitted far more than you have been harmed by being around Whites,
        whom you so despise. Whites, on the other hand, suffer day and night
        because of black demands for this or that.





        --- In confederatemovement@yahoogroups.com, "Stacy Wade Harris II"
        <unreconstructedone@e...> wrote:
        > ===================================================================
        >
        > 62nd Congress
        >
        > 2nd Session
        >
        > S. 4652
        >
        >
        > IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES
        >
        > January 18, 1912 Mr. Swanson introduced the following bill; which
        was read twice and referred to the Committee on Claims
        >
        >
        > A BILL
        >
        > For the relief of certain Confederate officers for improper and
        illegal injuries inflicted.
        >
        >
        > Whereas upon the eighteenth day of June, eighteen hundred and sixty-
        four, upon the demand of Major Gen. J. G. Foster, commanding the
        Union forces of the Dept. of the South, fifty Confederate officers
        were sent to him by the order of Mjr. Gen. Halleck, United States
        Army, for the purpose of retaliation, the said Mjr. Gen. Foster,
        assuming from certain correspondence between him and Mjr. Gen. Sam
        Jones, of the Confederate Army, that certain Union officers held as
        prisoners of war in the city of Charleston, SC, were so located in
        said city that they were in danger of being injured from the
        explosion of shells fired from Batteries Waggoner, Gregg, and other
        land batteries, and from the United States fleet shelling the
        aforesaid city; and
        >
        > Whereas, after mutual explanation between the aforesaid United
        States and Confederate generals, the said misunderstanding resulted
        in the exchange of the fifty Confederate officers sent to Mjr. Gen.
        Foster, as aforesaid, for an equal number of United States officers;
        and
        >
        > Whereas, notwithstanding after said explanation and mutual
        exchange, together with evidence that the facts charged were false,
        the said Gen. Foster again called for six hundred other Confederate
        officers of different ranks, who were being held as prisoners of war
        at Ft. DE, to be sent to Morris Island as subjects for special
        retaliation, notwithstanding no charges were made against them other
        than prisoners of war captured in battle. By order of Mjr. Gen.
        Halleck, United States Army, on the twentieth day of August, eighteen
        hundred and sixty-four, the said six hundred Confederate officers
        were placed aboard the steamer Crescent at Ft. DE, to be transported
        to Morris Island, SC. The capacity of the steamer was inadequate for
        such a number; and all being required to remain below deck,
        >
        > the suffering from heat and filth and thirst of water was
        unbearable, and the voyage which should have been made in three days
        was lengthened out to eighteen days, so that upon arrival at Morris
        Island they were in a famished condition. Here they were confined
        from the ninth day of September, eighteen hundred and sixty four, to
        the twentieth day of November in a stockade built between Batteries
        Greg and Waggoner of the Union forces of Morris Island, with no
        protection from the burning rays of the sun save small fly tents and
        within immediate range of the fire of the guns from the Confederate
        batteries replying to the bombarding of the city of Charleston,
        whilst also endangered by the premature bursting of shells fired from
        the Union batteries immediately over their heads. The daily rations
        issued during this term of forty-two days consisted of four hard-tack
        Army crackers, frequently wormy; one ounce of fat pickled pork and
        half a pint of bean soup, alternated at times with half a pint of
        mush made from meal that was old and wormy; and the only drinking
        water was impure, being obtained from wells dug in the sand upon
        which the stockade was located; and
        >
        > Whereas, also on the twentieth day of November, eighteen hundred
        and sixty-four, the said six hundred Confederate officers were
        removed from the stockade and transported to Ft. Pulaski, GA, where
        they were assigned to quarter in the cold, damp casemates, without
        fire or blankets to protect them from the cold blasts of winter.
        After some weeks intervened, two hundred of the number were sent to
        Hilton Head, SC, to relieve the crowded condition of the fort, which
        was telling upon their constitutions. Again the specious plea of
        retaliation was resorted to without any alleged ground as before and
        an order was given that each daily ration should be ten ounces of
        rotten corn meal only, which, when baked in a cake, constituted the
        entire food for a day, and to this was added an ample supply of
        cucumber and onion pickle, which, if eaten, only increased the pangs
        of hunger. This was the sole and entire rations upon which those six
        hundred officers were compelled to subsist for sixty five consecutive
        days; and
        >
        > Whereas this treatment of said Confederate officers, against whom
        no charges were made other than recognized prisoners of war, was
        unjustifiable and contrary to all the acknowledged rights of
        belligerency and without a precedent as an established principle in
        civilized warfare: Therefore
        >
        > Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the
        United states of America in Congress assembled, that the Treasurer of
        the United States is hereby ordered and directed to pay each survivor
        of the six hundred aforesaid officers and to the legal heirs of the
        deceased officers the sum of five thousand dollars each, as damages
        and reparation for the acts aforesaid.
        >
        > __________________
        >
        > Stacy Wade Harris II
        > Franklin County , North Carolina
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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