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parallelogram

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  • Linus Akesson
    Hi! Time to power up the C-One: http://www.linusakesson.net/scene/parallelogram/index.php Best regards, Linus
    Message 1 of 8 , Apr 12 1:11 AM
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      Hi!

      Time to power up the C-One:

      http://www.linusakesson.net/scene/parallelogram/index.php

      Best regards,
      Linus
    • Chris Syntichakis
      Its nice to see some nice stuff for the shit err... c-one ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Message 2 of 8 , Apr 12 1:20 AM
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        Its nice to see some nice stuff for the shit err... c-one


        On 12 April 2012 09:11, Linus Akesson <lft@...> wrote:

        > **
        >
        >
        > Hi!
        >
        > Time to power up the C-One:
        >
        > http://www.linusakesson.net/scene/parallelogram/index.php
        >
        > Best regards,
        > Linus
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Carsten Elton Sørensen
        This is supercool Linus! Congrats on your victory! I was wondering if you could write/blog or document your main board replacement? I thought that was an
        Message 3 of 8 , Apr 12 3:04 AM
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          This is supercool Linus! Congrats on your victory!

          I was wondering if you could write/blog or document your main board
          replacement? I thought that was an excellent contraption. I suspect I would
          get a little more FPGA coding done with a setup like that.

          Cheers,
          Carsten

          On Thu, Apr 12, 2012 at 10:11, Linus Akesson <lft@...> wrote:

          > Hi!
          >
          > Time to power up the C-One:
          >
          > http://www.linusakesson.net/scene/parallelogram/index.php
          >
          > Best regards,
          > Linus
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Mark McDougall
          ... It s impressive work, but I m wondering... why? This demo could have easily been coded on a PC... Or was it purely a learning exercise for you? On another
          Message 4 of 8 , Apr 12 4:44 AM
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            On 12/04/2012 6:11 PM, Linus Akesson wrote:

            > Time to power up the C-One:
            > http://www.linusakesson.net/scene/parallelogram/index.php

            It's impressive work, but I'm wondering... why? This demo could have easily
            been coded on a PC...

            Or was it purely a learning exercise for you?

            On another note, could the graphics engine have any utility in the emulation
            of existing systems? Would be nice to see your efforts used for something...
            "useful"! (Not to take anything away from your demo, hope you don't take
            offence).

            Regards,

            --
            | Mark McDougall | "Electrical Engineers do it
            | <http://members.iinet.net.au/~msmcdoug> | with less resistance!"
          • Carsten Elton Sørensen
            ... Why? Because that s what the demoscene is all about. Or at least it was before it got all artsy ;) People do all kinds of crazy stuff. They still make C64
            Message 5 of 8 , Apr 12 6:55 AM
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              On Thu, Apr 12, 2012 at 13:44, Mark McDougall <msmcdoug@...> wrote:

              > It's impressive work, but I'm wondering... why? This demo could have easily
              > been coded on a PC...
              >

              Why? Because that's what the demoscene is all about. Or at least it was
              before it got all artsy ;)

              People do all kinds of crazy stuff. They still make C64 demos. They could
              easily have done those on the PC. People still make Atari 2600 games. They
              could easily have done those on the PC. And, dare I say - we run C64 cores
              on a C-One, we could just as well use a C64 emulator on a PC.

              Best,
              Carsten


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Mark McDougall
              ... I can understand writing a demo - or game - for an old machine, that makes sense. And I also get hardware emulation (as opposed to software on a PC) -
              Message 6 of 8 , Apr 12 7:08 AM
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                On 12/04/2012 11:55 PM, Carsten Elton Sørensen wrote:

                > People do all kinds of crazy stuff. They still make C64 demos. They could
                > easily have done those on the PC. People still make Atari 2600 games. They
                > could easily have done those on the PC. And, dare I say - we run C64 cores
                > on a C-One, we could just as well use a C64 emulator on a PC.

                I can understand writing a demo - or game - for an old machine, that makes
                sense. And I also 'get' hardware emulation (as opposed to software on a PC)
                - after all I've done both myself.

                What is a bit odd (to me) is developing a custom platform to write a demo -
                that sort of defeats the purpose a bit, doesn't it? The idea of a demo is to
                see who can squeeze the maximum performance out of a machine... doesn't mean
                much on custom hardware though???

                But I can understand if it was purely a learning experience. Would be cool
                to be able to use the engine for emulation of some other retro platform...
                like the N64 for example!

                Regards,

                --
                | Mark McDougall | "Electrical Engineers do it
                | <http://members.iinet.net.au/~msmcdoug> | with less resistance!"
              • Linus Akesson
                ... I agree, and there are two further point to be made: First, with demos, the result that we see and hear is only the surface. The (partial) knowledge of how
                Message 7 of 8 , Apr 12 7:11 AM
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                  On Thu, Apr 12, 2012 at 03:55:32PM +0200, Carsten Elton Sørensen wrote:
                  > On Thu, Apr 12, 2012 at 13:44, Mark McDougall <msmcdoug@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > > It's impressive work, but I'm wondering... why? This demo could have easily
                  > > been coded on a PC...
                  > >
                  >
                  > Why? Because that's what the demoscene is all about. Or at least it was
                  > before it got all artsy ;)
                  >
                  > People do all kinds of crazy stuff. They still make C64 demos. They could
                  > easily have done those on the PC. People still make Atari 2600 games. They
                  > could easily have done those on the PC. And, dare I say - we run C64 cores
                  > on a C-One, we could just as well use a C64 emulator on a PC.
                  >
                  > Best,
                  > Carsten

                  I agree, and there are two further point to be made:

                  First, with demos, the result that we see and hear is only the surface. The
                  (partial) knowledge of how the sound and visuals arise are a fundamental part
                  of the experience. Otherwise, why make demos at all, when offline rendering
                  could produce the same visuals? Similarly, why would we care about somebody
                  climbing Mount Everest, when any commercial flight would take them higher?

                  Second, the limitations of a system strongly influence the creative process,
                  meaning that the demo would not have turned out in this specific way if I had
                  been working with a PC platform.

                  Best regards,
                  Linus
                  -------------------------------- http://www.linusakesson.net/ ---
                  ``Coding standards or guidelines will not make good programmers
                  out of bad programmers. They have absolutely no effect at all
                  on the correctness of the code that a programmer produces. You
                  cannot legislate good design.''
                  -- Robert Martin
                  -----------------------------------------------------------------
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                • Carsten Elton Sørensen
                  ... You could also argue that *the C-One* is the platform to which you re constrained. Granted, there aren t many C-One demos out there, but if there were,
                  Message 8 of 8 , Apr 12 7:50 AM
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                    On Thu, Apr 12, 2012 at 16:08, Mark McDougall <msmcdoug@...> wrote:

                    > What is a bit odd (to me) is developing a custom platform to write a demo -
                    > that sort of defeats the purpose a bit, doesn't it? The idea of a demo is
                    > to
                    > see who can squeeze the maximum performance out of a machine... doesn't
                    > mean
                    > much on custom hardware though???
                    >

                    You could also argue that *the C-One* is the platform to which you're
                    constrained. Granted, there aren't many C-One demos out there, but if there
                    were, they'd be competing on the same terms.

                    But yeah, from the perspective you present it doesn't make a lot of sense.
                    But does it really have to?

                    We're guys - we do stuff, just for the hell of it, ALL the time. "Hold my
                    beer while I try something..." I mean, does racing a motorcycle round and
                    round a track for an hour make any kind of sense? Does it actually
                    contribute anything other than CO2? It turns out it does - it does one
                    thing very well - it makes people, the rider and audience, happy.
                    Motorcyclists in the audience especially as they can appreciate the skill
                    involved. Same thing with demos and particularly Linus' demo - to make
                    that, you'd need skills in very diverse technical areas (which you are
                    aware of).

                    It's just an impressive achievement and I was impressed (something that's
                    not easy to do :)

                    Best,
                    Carsten


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