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conan in your country

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  • Hendra
    Hi, I ve been asking to some of TV station in my country why they don t broadcast anime in japanese. Now I want you to tell me, does anime in your country
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 10, 2000
      Hi, I've been asking to some of TV station in my country why they don't
      broadcast anime in japanese. Now I want you to tell me, does anime in your
      country broadcast in regional language or in japanese with subtitle ? Who
      arrange the broadcasting language of an anime : the anime producer, the
      producer's country's law, the tv station's country's law, or the tv station
      itself ?

      Please tell me ........
      Arigato gozaimasu

      "Meijin o omou"
      >Master Meijin<
    • Sasami
      In the US, all the anime that s broadcast is dubbed, usually horrible dubbed, although the Pokemon dub is pretty good in my opinion. Sometimes, the series is
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 10, 2000
        In the US, all the anime that's broadcast is dubbed, usually horrible
        dubbed, although the Pokemon dub is pretty good in my opinion. Sometimes,
        the series is edited because it contains stuff that won't pass US network
        censors like punching and slight nudity. And even worse, sometimes, it gets
        sliced and diced really badly like how Card Captor Sakura is right now,
        it's called Cardcaptors and Li Syaoran is made into a lead character along
        with Sakura. Anyways, as I was saying, all anime that's braodcast in the US
        is dubbed. I haven't come across any anime that's been subbed yet, of
        course, I dn't have cable, so I'm deprived of that resource....

        Anyways...

        -Sasami


        >Hi, I've been asking to some of TV station in my country why they don't
        >broadcast anime in japanese. Now I want you to tell me, does anime in your
        >country broadcast in regional language or in japanese with subtitle ? Who
        >arrange the broadcasting language of an anime : the anime producer, the
        >producer's country's law, the tv station's country's law, or the tv station
        >itself ?
        >
        >Please tell me ........
        >Arigato gozaimasu
        >
        >"Meijin o omou"
        >>Master Meijin<
      • GPS
        Back in the eighties the only way one could watch an anime in Indonesia was by rent a vhs/beta tape from a local rental. Thankfully they prefered to subtitling
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 11, 2000
          Back in the eighties the only way one could watch an anime in Indonesia was
          by rent a vhs/beta tape from a local rental. Thankfully they prefered to
          subtitling the stuff then dubbing it due to the lower cost of the
          subtitiling process. It was a blast listening to the word tasukete or what
          you, infact I could swear that tasukete was way more popular then sayonara,
          second only to arigato gozaimasu in popularity.
          The frequent used of dubbing in the television media are due to the media
          target audience. Anime and most cartoon are targeted to children and babies
          mostly, with teenagers and young adults or young at heart adults as a nice
          side effect only.
          It simply make no sense to subtitling the anime since the targeted audience
          barely could spell.
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Sasami <sasami20@...>
          To: <conan@egroups.com>
          Sent: 11 Juli 2000 10:32
          Subject: Re: [conan] conan in your country


          > In the US, all the anime that's broadcast is dubbed, usually horrible
          > dubbed, although the Pokemon dub is pretty good in my opinion. Sometimes,
          > the series is edited because it contains stuff that won't pass US network
        • Hendra
          Greetings GPS, Hei, it s getting reverse, in eighties and the beginning of nineties, the anime in Indonesia are (almost all) for children, but they broadcast
          Message 4 of 6 , Jul 11, 2000
            Greetings GPS,
            Hei, it's getting reverse, in eighties and the beginning of nineties, the
            anime in Indonesia are (almost all) for children, but they broadcast it with
            english and subtitled it. But now, (again, almost all of) the anime aren't
            only for children, new kind of anime have created like Meitantei Conan,
            Rurouni Kenshin, etc, they all not for children (under 13) but they are
            broadcasted in Indonesia, but some cartoon (from english of course)
            broadcasted in their true language with subtitles (you see droopy, and
            etc).Is the TV station can't broadcast in other languages except English or
            what ?

            To All members, please tell me how the anime broadcasted in your country. OK

            Jya!

            Hendra


            ----- Original Message -----
            From: GPS <GrandPooh@...>
            To: <conan@egroups.com>
            Sent: Tuesday, July 11, 2000 2:24 PM
            Subject: Re: [conan] conan in your country


            > Back in the eighties the only way one could watch an anime in Indonesia
            was
            > by rent a vhs/beta tape from a local rental. Thankfully they prefered to
            > subtitling the stuff then dubbing it due to the lower cost of the
            > subtitiling process. It was a blast listening to the word tasukete or what
            > you, infact I could swear that tasukete was way more popular then
            sayonara,
            > second only to arigato gozaimasu in popularity.
            > The frequent used of dubbing in the television media are due to the media
            > target audience. Anime and most cartoon are targeted to children and
            babies
            > mostly, with teenagers and young adults or young at heart adults as a nice
            > side effect only.
            > It simply make no sense to subtitling the anime since the targeted
            audience
            > barely could spell.
          • GPS
            Nope, there s only one t.v station back then in the eighties that was available nationwide. And what I m referring to as an anime are japanese cartoon show
            Message 5 of 6 , Jul 12, 2000
              Nope, there's only one t.v station back then in the eighties that was
              available nationwide. And what I'm referring to as an "anime" are japanese
              cartoon show which would left out Scooby-Doo, Tarzan, Pac-Man, and Space
              Ghost out of the picture.
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Hendra <hendra@...>
              To: <conan@egroups.com>
              Sent: 11 Juli 2000 18:43
              Subject: Re: [conan] conan in your country


              > Greetings GPS,
              > Hei, it's getting reverse, in eighties and the beginning of nineties, the
              > anime in Indonesia are (almost all) for children, but they broadcast it
              with
              > english and subtitled it. But now, (again, almost all of) the anime aren't
            • aChar!
              ... Indonesia was ... prefered to ... What?? So in Indosiar now, which one do they do to it: subtitling or dubbing? Usually they dub all the anime that s
              Message 6 of 6 , Jul 13, 2000
                > Back in the eighties the only way one could watch an anime in
                Indonesia was
                > by rent a vhs/beta tape from a local rental. Thankfully they
                prefered to
                > subtitling the stuff then dubbing it due to the lower cost of the
                > subtitiling process.

                What?? So in Indosiar now, which one do they do to it: subtitling or
                dubbing? Usually they dub all the anime that's aired, Doraemon is one
                of the *stupid* example. As what I remember, Magic Knight hasn't gone
                too weird with the dub, but I doubt Conan would be somehow acceptable
                and "solve-able" as some of the mysteries requires to be solved with
                their kanji preferences.

                Hopefully they don't slice and dice it too much by December... it's a
                pity that I'm getting back on Sunday afternoon, which means that I'm
                going to miss the morning's show.

                Marsha
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