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[Computational Complexity] Definitions of Advice

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  • Lance
    When Karp and Lipton showed that if NP had polynomial-size circuits the polynomial-time hierarchy collapses, they also give a general definition of nonuniform
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 10, 2006
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      When Karp and Lipton showed that if NP had polynomial-size circuits the polynomial-time hierarchy collapses, they also give a general definition of nonuniform complexity.
      Let C be a class of languages and F be a set of functions. The class C/F is the set of all languages L such that there exists an A in C and an arbitrary f that maps n to strings with |f(n)| in F such that
      x is in L ⇔ (x,f(|x|)) is in A
      Seems natural but this definition has given complexity theorists headaches for many years. The definition works fine for the applications in the Karp-Lipton paper, but it loses the semantic meaning of complexity classes in general.

      In particular consider (NP∩co-NP)/poly. We need an A in NP∩co-NP for the definition above, but note that means we need two NP machines that accept complementary languages even for all possible advice strings, not just the correct one. In our toolkit paper we give a relativized world where NP/1∩co-NP/1 is not contained in (NP∩co-NP)/poly. We don't even know if (NP/poly)∩co-NP is contained in (NP∩co-NP)/poly.

      At least we can use the terminology NP/poly∩co-NP/poly to nicely capture the class we want. For other classes like BPP/log we have no such clean notation. Once could make some new notation (someone suggested C//F) but instead we usually just state early on that we are not using the official Karp-Lipton terminology and only require the BPP behavior for correct advice.

      Karp and Lipton did nothing wrong. They use a very natural definition that works for their purposes. Unfortunately the natural definition does not match the natural interpretation for all classes and will continue to confuse inexperienced complexity theorists for years to come.

      --
      Posted by Lance to Computational Complexity at 7/10/2006 09:18:00 AM

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