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[Computational Complexity] Taulbee Survey

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  • Lance
    Via CRA Bulletin the 2004-2005 Taulbee Survey has been posted. A wealth of statistics about computer science in the US and Canada. The charts fall into several
    Message 1 of 1 , May 17, 2006
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      Via CRA Bulletin the 2004-2005 Taulbee Survey has been posted. A wealth of statistics about computer science in the US and Canada. The charts fall into several major categories.
      1. Ph.D. Production and Employment. Most CS Ph.D's ever (1189) last year. Nearly all of them found jobs.
      2. Bachelor and Master's Students. Enrollment continues to decline.
      3. Faculty Demographics. Faculty sizes continue to grow, though slowly, and are getting slightly more diverse.
      4. Research and Graduate Student Support. A drop in research expenditures likely due to fewer grants.
      5. Faculty Salaries. Truly useful when negotiating your pay. An interesting inversion where the schools ranked 13-24 in CS pay higher salaries than the schools ranked 1-12. And just who is being paid $400K?
      The end of the report sums up the statistics nicely.
      As predicted last year, our field is producing Ph.D.s at a record rate, and the short-term forecast is for continued record production. While there is no evidence in our employment statistics that the increased production is resulting in an inability of Ph.D. graduates to find work, an increasing fraction of new Ph.D.s appear to be taking positions outside of North America. In the wake of accelerating globalization of the marketplace, this is not surprising.

      Three consecutive years of decreasing numbers of new Ph.D. students, and a sharply reduced pipeline at the Bachelor's level, will make it difficult to sustain this production rate in the longer term. Moreover, it is not yet clear when the decline in our undergraduate program enrollments will end. The double-digit percent decrease in bachelor's production observed this year is likely to continue for the next several years. Coupled with the declining representation of women in our undergraduate programs, our ability to produce a workforce that is sufficiently educated technically to meet the needs of the job market in computing is being severely challenged. The declining enrollments at the Bachelor's level also will increasingly challenge the ability of CS/CE departments to grow their faculty as they desire.



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      Posted by Lance to Computational Complexity at 5/17/2006 09:51:00 PM
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