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[Computational Complexity] How was New York Theory Day?

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  • GASARCH
    REPORT AND REFLECT ON IBM/NYU/Columbia THEORY DAY Most years in the FALL there is a THEORY DAY at NYU and in the SPRING there is a THEORY DAY at Columbia. They
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 10, 2008
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      REPORT AND REFLECT ON IBM/NYU/Columbia THEORY DAY

      Most years in the FALL there is a THEORY DAY at NYU and in the SPRING there is a THEORY DAY at Columbia. They now call this IBM/NYU/Columbia Theory Day. The website did not say which numbered theory day, but the 2004 webpage for Theory day said it was the 25th one. If they have had these every semester since then... well, you can do the math.
      1. I was GOING TO post about content of the talks. But the abstracts of the talks do a better job, so I refer you to those. Should I have stayed home and just read the abstracts? NO. Seeing someone give a talk on something does provide extra insight.
      2. What does one get out of such things? It is good to know what is going on in theory, especially in parts of theory that you are NOT working on.
      3. Why is it good? I could say you might switch areas OR you might spot a connection to your area and make a contribution OR you might get a paper out of it. While all of these are true, just KNOWING stuff is important. One tangible aspect of that is, if you are on a Program Committee you will have a better idea of the papers not in your area. Also, it helps you follow talks at the next theory day, or some other venue where their are talks not in your area.
      4. I don't expect to follow that much of the talk. But I do expect (and this happened) to get introduced to an area and get some references that I may read later.
      5. Talks are an hour long. If it's a relatively new field (e.g., on-line Ad slot scheduleing) this is good. If it's a survey talk (Joe Mitchell's talk was) this is good. If it's on a classical field that you are not familiar with and they are proving the very latest results, then a full hour is a bit much. But this is just from my viewpoint of wanting to be introduced to a field. wanting to be introduced to a field.
      6. Most interesting thing I learned: Joe Mitchell, Comp Geom from SUNY Stonybrook, has had some of his work actually used by real people in the real world. (That may be a post later.) Since I am often skeptical of the practicality of theory, I was happy to hear this.
      7. Oddest thing I learned: NYU and Brooklyn Poly-Tech are merging in some fashion. Nobody quite knows the details or what this means yet. I'm hoping it means that theory day will one day be at Brooklyn Poly-Tech which will make my train ride to theory day 15 minutes shorter.
      8. New York Theory Day is usually announced about a month before it happens. This is not really enough time to plan. In fact, I have missed Columbia Theory day in the past because I had other plans by the time it was announced.


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      Posted By GASARCH to Computational Complexity at 12/10/2008 09:31:00 AM
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