Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [comic_books] New member here

Expand Messages
  • Mark Hershberger
    I d recommend skipping individual issues and only buying collected trades and graphic novels, it saves on money. A good way to catch up with what s out there
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 15, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      I'd recommend skipping individual issues and only buying collected trades and graphic novels, it saves on money. A good way to catch up with what's out there is to raid your local library (which carry graphic novels nowadays) and hang out at Barnes & Noble or Borders type stores, which have pretty sizable graphic novel sections, and read at your leisure. Libraries and stores carry a lot of manga (Japanese comics) and independent comics so you don't have to be limited to mainstream superhero stuff. Eventually you'll get a sense of what you'll like enough to wanna buy.

      Mark Hershberger


      --- On Fri, 8/15/08, Michael Marcus <michael@...> wrote:

      > From: Michael Marcus <michael@...>
      > Subject: Re: [comic_books] New member here
      > To: comic_books@yahoogroups.com
      > Date: Friday, August 15, 2008, 6:15 PM
      > Al,
      >
      > Welcome to the group. The best way to collect comics is to
      > buy what
      > you enjoy reading and/or looking at. That way, at the very
      > least, you
      > will have something that you will treasure personally. One
      > of the
      > primary reasons that old comic books sell for as much as
      > they do is
      > because they are items that were produced in limited
      > supply. These
      > days, the "big boys," Marvel and DC, are
      > producing their major series
      > in the tens of thousands, if not the hundreds of thousands.
      > Occasionally, they add insult to injury by producing
      > "special covers"
      > for the same book in an attempt to sell more to collectors.
      > Mind you,
      > in many cases, their stories have gotten bland, as well.
      >
      > My advice is to go looking to small press and independents.
      > First of
      > all, they usually have stories that you won't find at
      > the larger
      > presses, which means you're more likely to find some
      > better reads.
      > Second, they generally do smaller runs, which mean that
      > over time, it
      > will be harder to find their work if they get popular,
      > which, in turn,
      > makes them more valuable to collectors. Third, the
      > companies will
      > generally treat you better because they're run by
      > starving artists who
      > care more about their readers than they do about the bottom
      > line.
      >
      > Now, I'll fully admit that I'm biased, here, as a
      > producer of comics
      > myself, producing "Pulp Dreams" and
      > "IF-X" for Hamtramck Idea Men, but
      > I will also say that we're in good company. Evan
      > Derian, of Dead City
      > Comics, produces "Insignificant Gods," which had
      > me from issue 1 with
      > its stories of dystopic antiheroes trying to make sense of
      > their
      > situations. David Branstetter of dim-light does
      > "Straw Man," which is a
      > brilliant and sometimes hilarious story of an ex-policeman
      > whose dubious
      > "powers" lead him to fight crime and otherwise do
      > good. If you don't
      > mind trying out mini-comics and offerings at
      > other-than-comic-book size,
      > there's Matt Feazell's "Cynicalman" and
      > various works by Suzanne Baumann
      > at "Fridge Magnet Concoctions." And I'll
      > tell you this: ALL of us need
      > the money more than either Marvel or DC does.
      >
      > Here are some sites to check out:
      >
      > http://www.tezlon.com/html/store.htm
      > Larry Lonsby's "World of Tezlon"
      >
      > http://www.deadcitycomics.com/Pages/Comic_books.html
      > Evan Darian's "Insignificant Gods" site
      >
      > http://strawmancomics.com/
      > David Branstetter's "Straw Man"
      >
      > http://cynicalman.com/
      > Matt Feazell's "Cynicalman," "Cute
      > Girl" and more
      >
      > http://fridge-mag.net/
      > Suzanne Baumann's "Fridge Magnet Concoctions"
      > (and lots of free stuff, to boot)
      >
      > and of course
      > http://idea-men.us/
      > The Hamtramck Idea Men, producers of comics, games, shirts,
      > and more.
      >
      > Regardless of what you do, though, Al, buy what you like,
      > look to your
      > independent and small press, and just have fun doing what
      > you're doing.
      > There's no sense in doing something you hate.
      >
      > All the best,
      > Michael Marcus
      > Hamtramck Idea Men
      > http://idea-men.us
      >
      > Al Llop wrote:
      > > Good day everyone,
      > >
      > > My name is Al Llop and recently became interested in
      > comic books. I
      > > can tell you that years ago I was a baseball card
      > dealer and, to this
      > > date, I have lots of cards. I did buy a few comics
      > back then, (10
      > > years ago), and just put them away in a box. I am
      > guessing there is
      > > about 50 comics in there. Back then, my partner,
      > suggested that I buy
      > > #1's and that's exactly what I did. Spawn,
      > Blood..something or other,
      > > a few Silver Surfers and one showing Bart Simpson on
      > the cover. Aside
      > > of this, my knowledge of comic books is 0. My
      > > question....particularly when starting out....what is
      > the best way for
      > > me to collect comic books? Am I better off with the
      > older issues?
      > > Should I start collecting what comes out fresh from
      > now on?
      > >
      > > Any help would be appreciated.
      > >
      > > Al Llop
      > >
      > >
      > > ------------------------------------
      > >
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > __________ NOD32 3359 (20080815) Information
      > __________
      > >
      > > This message was checked by NOD32 antivirus system.
      > > http://www.eset.com
      > >
      > >
      > >
    • ComicSnobb@aol.com
      In a message dated 8/16/2008 12:17:32 AM Eastern Standard Time, mlhershb2@yahoo.com writes: I d recommend skipping individual issues and only buying collected
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 16, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        In a message dated 8/16/2008 12:17:32 AM Eastern Standard Time, mlhershb2@... writes:
        I'd recommend skipping individual issues and only buying collected trades and graphic novels, it saves on money.
        There are 4 basic types of collectors-
        1) Character/title collectors
        2) artist collectors
        3) writer collectors
        4) speculators
         
           Most people are a combination of the first 3 types.
           Buying Marvel or DC trades is NOT cheaper than getting the individual issues. They are priced so that the cost ends up being exactly the same. Not sure about the independents - most are by creators that haven't honed their skills well enough yet to get a job with the big two. (there ARE exceptions of course but they are rare)
             The first three enjoy reading comics more than buying comics, the speculators would be happier driving up the price of gas or buying Chinese stocks.
             Bill & Annie  www.JustMarvel.com
         
        You can read previews on line of each weeks Marvels (always at least the first 6 pages at www.Marvel.com




        Looking for a car that's sporty, fun and fits in your budget? Read reviews on AOL Autos.
      • Michael Marcus
        ... Wow. Talk about a bad generalization! In my experience of indies, it goes the other way around; there are a *lot* of artists with unusual styles and
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 17, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          ComicSnobb@... wrote:
          > Buying Marvel or DC trades is NOT cheaper than getting the individual
          > issues. They are priced so that the cost ends up being exactly the same. Not
          > sure about the independents - most are by creators that haven't honed their
          > skills well enough yet to get a job with the big two. (there ARE exceptions of
          > course but they are rare)

          Wow. Talk about a bad generalization!

          In my experience of indies, it goes the other way around; there are a
          *lot* of artists with unusual styles and creators with bizarre and fun
          stories out there, very few "lesser" artists make it past doing mini-
          and digest-sized comics. It's just too expensive to do even b/w print
          runs if you're not getting a readership and not making a profit (even a
          small one).

          Meanwhile, I've seen plenty of lazy and artists at both Marvel *and* DC
          who can only draw one shape of person or who let the colorist compensate
          for their utter lack of detail. The main reason my business partner
          George doesn't work with either of the Big Two any longer is because he

          1) likes working on the projects HE wants to do

          and

          2) doesn't have to "reset" his stories at the end so that they'll fit
          somebody else's story arc.

          (And George has created MANY of the heroes and villains that keep
          coming back--if you've seen this season's Marvel movies or cartoons,
          you've probably seen at *least* one!)

          Don't get me wrong, out of their combined hundred-plus titles, the big
          two *do* have a handful of titles worth reading... somewhere.
          Meanwhile, Marvel hasn't introduced a major character that's *lasted*
          since the 1970s, and DC can't stop rehashing old stories (my old fave,
          Hal Jordan's Green Lantern, is having his origin story told YET AGAIN,
          with new overt revisionism).

          All I'm saying is to keep an open mind, or you'll miss scenes like
          this:

          http://www.idea-men.us/p12.gif (George Mcvey's work)
          http://www.idea-men.us/if2_believe.jpg (Saul Haberfield)
          http://www.idea-men.us/if2_cover.jpg (Mario Mancuso)

          Then, of course, you have to *also* remember that many of your favorite
          authors will also do side-work on projects--Will Eisner used to do work
          for ANY publisher, no matter how small, and guys like William Messner-
          Loebs, who have worked on BIG DC titles also do a lot of indy work (in
          fact, he may even work with us on an upcoming IF-X!).

          Now admittedly, some of us indies are hard to find--even at stores where
          we *are*, you only see one or two titles amidst shelves filled with
          X-titles--and others only have web and convention presences, but if you
          want to find something few people have got, read something with art and
          story styles that are DIFFERENT from those of the Terrible Two, or just
          want to encourage some real VARIETY in the industry, take a second look
          at the indies and purchase something *new*.

          --M
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.