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PanSTARRS: An appreciation

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  • Rich
    If we look at the original MPC for L4, it shows a peak magnitude of 0.5, dipping to second magnitude around now. For a time, some optimistic light curves had
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 17, 2013
      If we look at the original MPC for L4, it shows a peak magnitude of 0.5, dipping to second magnitude around now. For a time, some optimistic light curves had the comet reaching -1, then a wave of pessimism had it peaking at +3. In the end, the comet has come in very close to the original predictions, so purely by the numbers, it cannot be said to be disappointing at all. The STEREO images are also very impressive. So I think there is a "great" or "near great" comet out there after all. Of course we all know that the observational reality is far short of that, but that is a function of L4's poor positioning in the sky. It also might be that we overestimated the visibility of a zero or first magnitude object in the twilight 15 or 20 degrees from the sun. I think that only comets like McNaught or Lovejoy that pass very near the sun can have an impressive appearance at these elongations. Perhaps the mistake was to think that L4 had any chance at all of appearing great, and expectations should have been kept low to avoid disappointment. I have contacted many people who have not been able to find the comet at all, due to trying with just their unaided eyes or junk binoculars, with minimal information like "look in the west just after sunset."
    • opennewscast
      With all due respect, I don t think this was a Great comet at all. There have been much better comets in recent years which were viewed by relatively few
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 17, 2013
        With all due respect, I don't think this was a Great comet at all. There have been much better comets in recent years which were viewed by relatively few people.

        PANSTARRS is only marginally a naked eye object. The object itself isn't even terribly photogenic as far as comets go.

        But, at least people will have enjoyed this before ISON fails to live up the unrealistic expectations people already have of it.



        Kind regards,
        -joshua


















        -----Original Message-----
        From: "Rich" <stargazer_08121961@...>
        Sent: Sunday, March 17, 2013 4:34pm
        To: comets-ml@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [comets-ml] PanSTARRS: An appreciation

        If we look at the original MPC for L4, it shows a peak magnitude of 0.5, dipping to second magnitude around now. For a time, some optimistic light curves had the comet reaching -1, then a wave of pessimism had it peaking at +3. In the end, the comet has come in very close to the original predictions, so purely by the numbers, it cannot be said to be disappointing at all. The STEREO images are also very impressive. So I think there is a "great" or "near great" comet out there after all. Of course we all know that the observational reality is far short of that, but that is a function of L4's poor positioning in the sky. It also might be that we overestimated the visibility of a zero or first magnitude object in the twilight 15 or 20 degrees from the sun. I think that only comets like McNaught or Lovejoy that pass very near the sun can have an impressive appearance at these elongations. Perhaps the mistake was to think that L4 had any chance at all of appearing great, and expectations should have been kept low to avoid disappointment. I have contacted many people who have not been able to find the comet at all, due to trying with just their unaided eyes or junk binoculars, with minimal information like "look in the west just after sunset."
      • P. Clay Sherrod
        Goodness, so you have already doomed Comet ISON before it even gets a chance to develop? On what criteria do you base your prognostication? Is this based on
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 17, 2013
          Goodness, so you have already doomed Comet ISON before it even gets a chance to
          develop?
          On what criteria do you base your prognostication? Is this based on empirical
          data, actual observations, or hearsay?

          The comet is very close to prediction at this time, that being from the
          scientific community and not the news media.

          Clay
          _____
          Dr. P. Clay Sherrod
          Arkansas Sky Observatories
          MPC H45 - Petit Jean Mountain South
          MPC H41 - Petit Jean Mountain
          MPC H43 - Conway West
          http://www.arksky.org/

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: <joshua@...>
          To: <comets-ml@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Sunday, March 17, 2013 5:13 PM
          Subject: RE: [comets-ml] PanSTARRS: An appreciation


          > With all due respect, I don't think this was a Great comet at all. There have
          > been much better comets in recent years which were viewed by relatively few
          > people.
          >
          > PANSTARRS is only marginally a naked eye object. The object itself isn't even
          > terribly photogenic as far as comets go.
          >
          > But, at least people will have enjoyed this before ISON fails to live up the
          > unrealistic expectations people already have of it.
          >
          >
          >
          > Kind regards,
          > -joshua
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: "Rich" <stargazer_08121961@...>
          > Sent: Sunday, March 17, 2013 4:34pm
          > To: comets-ml@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [comets-ml] PanSTARRS: An appreciation
          >
          > If we look at the original MPC for L4, it shows a peak magnitude of 0.5,
          > dipping to second magnitude around now. For a time, some optimistic light
          > curves had the comet reaching -1, then a wave of pessimism had it peaking at
          > +3. In the end, the comet has come in very close to the original predictions,
          > so purely by the numbers, it cannot be said to be disappointing at all. The
          > STEREO images are also very impressive. So I think there is a "great" or
          > "near great" comet out there after all. Of course we all know that the
          > observational reality is far short of that, but that is a function of L4's
          > poor positioning in the sky. It also might be that we overestimated the
          > visibility of a zero or first magnitude object in the twilight 15 or 20
          > degrees from the sun. I think that only comets like McNaught or Lovejoy that
          > pass very near the sun can have an impressive appearance at these elongations.
          > Perhaps the mistake was to think that L4 had any chance at all of appearing
          > great, an
          > d expectations should have been kept low to avoid disappointment. I have
          > contacted many people who have not been able to find the comet at all, due to
          > trying with just their unaided eyes or junk binoculars, with minimal
          > information like "look in the west just after sunset."
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
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        • Ellen Papenburg
          ah you know, it s still very rewarding to watch and the brightest one in while for me at least, even though my fingers froze yesterday so fast I couldn t do a
          Message 4 of 6 , Mar 17, 2013
            ah you know, it's still very rewarding to watch and the brightest one in
            while for me at least, even though my fingers froze yesterday so fast I
            couldn't do a thing anymore but go back into the car to get them to
            function as fingers instead of a useless bunch of sausages. But to see
            the li'l one with its slightly curved tail pop out of the background at
            8:30 EDT (daylight time, yes yes what an idiotic invention) is sure
            worth it.

            I'll defend the runt! because despite all, it's putting up a nice neat
            little show! ;-) Naked eye? Not here... but then tears ran down my face,
            and not of joy nbut from the biting cold (-11C felt like -17), so it
            might ruin my vision a bit.

            Tonight it's clear again.... I am going out there with my other half,
            stand on frozen snow at a farm about 10 minutes drive from here. Farmer
            and us exchanged smiles after he asked WTH we were doing on his
            driveway. "Nutters, but harmless" he must've thought. When I finally
            have some reasonable pics (my lenses and camera haven't behaved with
            focusing, getting there) I will print out some (maybe even post here,
            when I am finally happy) and throw it in his mailbox.

            Canada, eh? :-)

            Ellen - SW Ontario, Drayton


            On 17/03/2013 6:13 PM, joshua@... wrote:
            >
            > With all due respect, I don't think this was a Great comet at all.
            > There have been much better comets in recent years which were viewed
            > by relatively few people.
            >
            > PANSTARRS is only marginally a naked eye object. The object itself
            > isn't even terribly photogenic as far as comets go.
            >
            > But, at least people will have enjoyed this before ISON fails to live
            > up the unrealistic expectations people already have of it.
            >
            > Kind regards,
            > -joshua
            >



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • David Nicholls
            I once observed comet Tago-Sato-Kosaka (1969 T1) from the roof of the Physics Building at the University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, when the temperature was
            Message 5 of 6 , Mar 17, 2013
              I once observed comet Tago-Sato-Kosaka (1969 T1) from the roof of the Physics Building at the University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, when the temperature was -40. Not comfortable :-)

              DN

              On 18/03/2013, at 9:36 AM, Ellen Papenburg <ellen@...> wrote:

              > I'll defend the runt! because despite all, it's putting up a nice neat
              > little show! ;-) Naked eye? Not here... but then tears ran down my face,
              > and not of joy nbut from the biting cold (-11C felt like -17), so it
              > might ruin my vision a bit.
              >
              > Tonight it's clear again.... I am going out there with my other half,
              > stand on frozen snow at a farm about 10 minutes drive from here. Farmer
              > and us exchanged smiles after he asked WTH we were doing on his
              > driveway. "Nutters, but harmless" he must've thought. When I finally
              > have some reasonable pics (my lenses and camera haven't behaved with
              > focusing, getting there) I will print out some (maybe even post here,
              > when I am finally happy) and throw it in his mailbox.
              >
              > Canada, eh? :-)
              >
              > Ellen - SW Ontario, Drayton
            • Ellen Papenburg
              David, that beats it all! Kudos! As I am NOT (still not after 30 years) used to extreme temperatures (being from the old country Netherlands originally), it
              Message 6 of 6 , Mar 17, 2013
                David, that beats it all! Kudos!

                As I am NOT (still not after 30 years) used to extreme temperatures
                (being from the old country Netherlands originally), it hits me hard,
                but my husband who is a real canuck has not appreciated the cold either!

                Still not holding us back. Next episode coming up tonight.

                E.

                On 17/03/2013 6:57 PM, David Nicholls wrote:
                >
                > I once observed comet Tago-Sato-Kosaka (1969 T1) from the roof of the
                > Physics Building at the University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, when
                > the temperature was -40. Not comfortable :-)
                >
                > DN
                >
                > On 18/03/2013, at 9:36 AM, Ellen Papenburg <ellen@...
                > <mailto:ellen%40execulink.com>> wrote:
                >
                > > I'll defend the runt! because despite all, it's putting up a nice neat
                > > little show! ;-) Naked eye? Not here... but then tears ran down my
                > face,
                > > and not of joy nbut from the biting cold (-11C felt like -17), so it
                > > might ruin my vision a bit.
                > >
                > > Tonight it's clear again.... I am going out there with my other half,
                > > stand on frozen snow at a farm about 10 minutes drive from here. Farmer
                > > and us exchanged smiles after he asked WTH we were doing on his
                > > driveway. "Nutters, but harmless" he must've thought. When I finally
                > > have some reasonable pics (my lenses and camera haven't behaved with
                > > focusing, getting there) I will print out some (maybe even post here,
                > > when I am finally happy) and throw it in his mailbox.
                > >
                > > Canada, eh? :-)
                > >
                > > Ellen - SW Ontario, Drayton
                >
                >



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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