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C/2011 L4 PANSTARRS observation 2013 Feb 28

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  • Michael Mattiazzo
    Hi Folks, My observation of comet C/2011 L4 PANSTARRS this evening. 2013 Feb 28.41 UT: m1=2.6, Dia.= ~5 , DC=7...NE...Michael Mattiazzo (Castlemaine,
    Message 1 of 8 , Feb 28, 2013
      Hi Folks,

      My observation of comet C/2011 L4 PANSTARRS this evening.

      2013 Feb 28.41 UT: m1=2.6, Dia.= ~5' , DC=7...NE...Michael Mattiazzo
      (Castlemaine, Victoria)
      [End of nautical twilight. At 6 degrees altitude the comet, and small
      portion of tail, was clearly visible with the unaided eye, appearing
      marginally fainter than comparison stars Alpha Gruis (1.8) and Alpha Pavonis
      (1.9). In 25x100mm binoculars, the dust tail measured 1.5 degrees in PA165,
      with the much fainter and shorter type 3 dust trail in PA 205. The ion tail
      was not visible visually but is at least 2 degrees long in PA155 on a 3
      minute exposusure using a canon 60Da camera and 300mm lens]

      http://members.westnet.com.au/mmatti/sc.htm

      cheers,
      Michael
    • Colin Drescher
      Awesome pics and observation. We have been covered by clouds for the last couple of weeks and the next week ahead looks bad too. Tried for it on Sat night
      Message 2 of 8 , Feb 28, 2013
        Awesome pics and observation. We have been covered by clouds for the last couple of weeks and the next week ahead looks bad too. Tried for it on Sat night quickly before going out, but not seen with 12x50s in the mirk.

        Colin

        Sent from my iPad

        On 28/02/2013, at 10:50 PM, "Michael Mattiazzo" <mmatti@...> wrote:

        > Hi Folks,
        >
        > My observation of comet C/2011 L4 PANSTARRS this evening.
        >
        > 2013 Feb 28.41 UT: m1=2.6, Dia.= ~5' , DC=7...NE...Michael Mattiazzo
        > (Castlemaine, Victoria)
        > [End of nautical twilight. At 6 degrees altitude the comet, and small
        > portion of tail, was clearly visible with the unaided eye, appearing
        > marginally fainter than comparison stars Alpha Gruis (1.8) and Alpha Pavonis
        > (1.9). In 25x100mm binoculars, the dust tail measured 1.5 degrees in PA165,
        > with the much fainter and shorter type 3 dust trail in PA 205. The ion tail
        > was not visible visually but is at least 2 degrees long in PA155 on a 3
        > minute exposusure using a canon 60Da camera and 300mm lens]
        >
        > http://members.westnet.com.au/mmatti/sc.htm
        >
        > cheers,
        > Michael
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Bob King
        Michael and Jim - wonderful photos! You re getting us northern hemisphere observers pretty excited. Thanks, Bob On Thu, Feb 28, 2013 at 7:01 AM, Colin Drescher
        Message 3 of 8 , Feb 28, 2013
          Michael and Jim - wonderful photos! You're getting us northern hemisphere
          observers pretty excited.
          Thanks,
          Bob

          On Thu, Feb 28, 2013 at 7:01 AM, Colin Drescher
          <colindrescher@...>wrote:

          > **
          >
          >
          > Awesome pics and observation. We have been covered by clouds for the last
          > couple of weeks and the next week ahead looks bad too. Tried for it on Sat
          > night quickly before going out, but not seen with 12x50s in the mirk.
          >
          > Colin
          >
          > Sent from my iPad
          >
          >
          > On 28/02/2013, at 10:50 PM, "Michael Mattiazzo" mmatti@...>
          > wrote:
          >
          > > Hi Folks,
          > >
          > > My observation of comet C/2011 L4 PANSTARRS this evening.
          > >
          > > 2013 Feb 28.41 UT: m1=2.6, Dia.= ~5' , DC=7...NE...Michael Mattiazzo
          > > (Castlemaine, Victoria)
          > > [End of nautical twilight. At 6 degrees altitude the comet, and small
          > > portion of tail, was clearly visible with the unaided eye, appearing
          > > marginally fainter than comparison stars Alpha Gruis (1.8) and Alpha
          > Pavonis
          > > (1.9). In 25x100mm binoculars, the dust tail measured 1.5 degrees in
          > PA165,
          > > with the much fainter and shorter type 3 dust trail in PA 205. The ion
          > tail
          > > was not visible visually but is at least 2 degrees long in PA155 on a 3
          > > minute exposusure using a canon 60Da camera and 300mm lens]
          > >
          > > http://members.westnet.com.au/mmatti/sc.htm
          > >
          > > cheers,
          > > Michael
          > >
          > >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • James
          Is there anyone on the space station right now who can take a picture of PanSTARRS in a dark sky? If so, can anyone get a message to them? That would really
          Message 4 of 8 , Feb 28, 2013
            Is there anyone on the space station right now who can take a picture of PanSTARRS in a dark sky? If so, can anyone get a message to them? That would really get us excited up here.

            Jim

            --- In comets-ml@yahoogroups.com, Bob King <nightsky55@...> wrote:
            >
            > Michael and Jim - wonderful photos! You're getting us northern hemisphere
            > observers pretty excited.
            > Thanks,
            > Bob
            >
            > On Thu, Feb 28, 2013 at 7:01 AM, Colin Drescher
            > <colindrescher@...>wrote:
            >
            > > **
            > >
            > >
            > > Awesome pics and observation. We have been covered by clouds for the last
            > > couple of weeks and the next week ahead looks bad too. Tried for it on Sat
            > > night quickly before going out, but not seen with 12x50s in the mirk.
            > >
            > > Colin
            > >
            > > Sent from my iPad
            > >
            > >
            > > On 28/02/2013, at 10:50 PM, "Michael Mattiazzo" mmatti@...>
            > > wrote:
            > >
            > > > Hi Folks,
            > > >
            > > > My observation of comet C/2011 L4 PANSTARRS this evening.
            > > >
            > > > 2013 Feb 28.41 UT: m1=2.6, Dia.= ~5' , DC=7...NE...Michael Mattiazzo
            > > > (Castlemaine, Victoria)
            > > > [End of nautical twilight. At 6 degrees altitude the comet, and small
            > > > portion of tail, was clearly visible with the unaided eye, appearing
            > > > marginally fainter than comparison stars Alpha Gruis (1.8) and Alpha
            > > Pavonis
            > > > (1.9). In 25x100mm binoculars, the dust tail measured 1.5 degrees in
            > > PA165,
            > > > with the much fainter and shorter type 3 dust trail in PA 205. The ion
            > > tail
            > > > was not visible visually but is at least 2 degrees long in PA155 on a 3
            > > > minute exposusure using a canon 60Da camera and 300mm lens]
            > > >
            > > > http://members.westnet.com.au/mmatti/sc.htm
            > > >
            > > > cheers,
            > > > Michael
            > > >
            > > >
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • David Strange
            Jim, You can tweet Chris Hadfield: #Cmdr_Hadfield on the ISS who I am sure would oblige. He has been tweeting some incredible pictures of Earth daily. I ll
            Message 5 of 8 , Feb 28, 2013
              Jim,
              You can tweet Chris Hadfield: #Cmdr_Hadfield on
              the ISS who I am sure would oblige.
              He has been tweeting some incredible pictures of
              Earth daily. I'll put in a request right now!
              David

              At 16:50 28/02/2013, you wrote:
              >
              >
              >Is there anyone on the space station right now
              >who can take a picture of PanSTARRS in a dark
              >sky? If so, can anyone get a message to them?
              >That would really get us excited up here.
              >
              >Jim
              >
              >--- In
              ><mailto:comets-ml%40yahoogroups.com>comets-ml@yahoogroups.com, Bob King wrote:
              > >
              > > Michael and Jim - wonderful photos! You're getting us northern hemisphere
              > > observers pretty excited.
              > > Thanks,
              > > Bob
              > >
              > > On Thu, Feb 28, 2013 at 7:01 AM, Colin Drescher
              > > wrote:
              > >
              > > > **
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > Awesome pics and observation. We have been covered by clouds for the last
              > > > couple of weeks and the next week ahead
              > looks bad too. Tried for it on Sat
              > > > night quickly before going out, but not seen with 12x50s in the mirk.
              > > >
              > > > Colin
              > > >
              > > > Sent from my iPad
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > On 28/02/2013, at 10:50 PM, "Michael Mattiazzo" mmatti@...>
              > > > wrote:
              > > >
              > > > > Hi Folks,
              > > > >
              > > > > My observation of comet C/2011 L4 PANSTARRS this evening.
              > > > >
              > > > > 2013 Feb 28.41 UT: m1=2.6, Dia.= ~5' , DC=7...NE...Michael Mattiazzo
              > > > > (Castlemaine, Victoria)
              > > > > [End of nautical twilight. At 6 degrees altitude the comet, and small
              > > > > portion of tail, was clearly visible with the unaided eye, appearing
              > > > > marginally fainter than comparison stars Alpha Gruis (1.8) and Alpha
              > > > Pavonis
              > > > > (1.9). In 25x100mm binoculars, the dust tail measured 1.5 degrees in
              > > > PA165,
              > > > > with the much fainter and shorter type 3 dust trail in PA 205. The ion
              > > > tail
              > > > > was not visible visually but is at least 2 degrees long in PA155 on a 3
              > > > > minute exposusure using a canon 60Da camera and 300mm lens]
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > <http://members.westnet.com.au/mmatti/sc.htm>http://members.westnet.com.au/mmatti/sc.htm
              > > > >
              > > > > cheers,
              > > > > Michael
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > >
              > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > >
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              >
              >
            • skyweek
              ... I tried that in vain for McNaught in 2007 that no one had told the crew about and which they discovered by pure coincidence after a while but never got
              Message 6 of 8 , Feb 28, 2013
                > Is there anyone on the space station right now who can take a picture of
                > PanSTARRS in a dark sky? If so, can anyone get a message to them?

                I tried that in vain for McNaught in 2007 that no one had told the crew
                about and which they "discovered" by pure coincidence after a while but
                never got any useful observations done. For PANSTARRS (and ISON) I'm
                following several tracks since last fall in the hope to get the message
                "up"; after all they *did* get fine Lovejoy images.

                The main problem - apart from crew time - is that the ISS flies mostly in
                gravity gradient mode, i.e. it changes attitude relative to the stars all
                the time; the modern DSLRs they've got up there seem to handle that well,
                though, with short exposures at high ISO numbers. Since the elongation of
                PANSTARRS never falls below 15°, in principle ISS-bound observers could
                follow it continously through perihelion as long as the Sun is behind the
                Earth (or some part of the station).

                Daniel
              • christina feliciano
                I will try. ~Christina From: dfischer@astro.uni-bonn.de To: comets-ml@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday, February 28, 2013 9:31 AM
                Message 7 of 8 , Feb 28, 2013
                  I will try.
                  ~Christina

                  From: "dfischer@...-bonn.de" <dfischer@...-bonn.de>
                  To: comets-ml@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Thursday, February 28, 2013 9:31 AM
                  Subject: Re: [comets-ml] Re: C/2011 L4 PANSTARRS observation 2013 Feb 28

                   
                  > Is there anyone on the space station right now who can take a picture of
                  > PanSTARRS in a dark sky? If so, can anyone get a message to them?

                  I tried that in vain for McNaught in 2007 that no one had told the crew
                  about and which they "discovered" by pure coincidence after a while but
                  never got any useful observations done. For PANSTARRS (and ISON) I'm
                  following several tracks since last fall in the hope to get the message
                  "up"; after all they *did* get fine Lovejoy images.

                  The main problem - apart from crew time - is that the ISS flies mostly in
                  gravity gradient mode, i.e. it changes attitude relative to the stars all
                  the time; the modern DSLRs they've got up there seem to handle that well,
                  though, with short exposures at high ISO numbers. Since the elongation of
                  PANSTARRS never falls below 15°, in principle ISS-bound observers could
                  follow it continously through perihelion as long as the Sun is behind the
                  Earth (or some part of the station).

                  Daniel




                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • David H
                  wow Great pics!!! really love the tails.   Thanks David Hemmer [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  Message 8 of 8 , Mar 1, 2013
                    wow Great pics!!! really love the tails.


                     
                    Thanks


                    David Hemmer

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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