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Lovejoy tail 32 degrees, 18 Jan 2012

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  • Rob
    Clear skies and gave it one more go. The tail appears to extend to a length of 32 degrees. There is the vaguest hint of it continuing to the Milky Way but I
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 18, 2012
      Clear skies and gave it one more go. The tail appears to extend to a length of 32 degrees. There is the vaguest hint of it continuing to the Milky Way but I think it's star alignments doing it, as on the 16th. Details on pic:
      http://i727.photobucket.com/albums/ww271/Rob_Kau/C2011W318Jan2012invertfulltextsm.jpg

      Here's the normally-processed version, with the comet barely visible:
      http://i727.photobucket.com/albums/ww271/Rob_Kau/C2011W318Jan201211-34UTredsm.jpg

      Here's a link to Lester Barnes' composite widefield from 16 Jan, showing about 35 degrees of tail and no extension to or through the Milky Way:
      http://i638.photobucket.com/albums/uu109/Lester_045/Comet%20images/38c7df7a.jpg

      Cheers -

      Rob Kaufman
      Bright, Victoria, Australia
    • GD
      Awesome pics, Rob. I went hunting for it from two dark spots in central Victoria that I know (one of them the LMDSS where the sky was not only dark but the air
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 19, 2012
        Awesome pics, Rob.

        I went hunting for it from two dark spots in central Victoria that I know (one of them the LMDSS where the sky was not only dark but the air exceptionally steady), however on both nights the comet was invisible in 7x50s. I had my 8 inch f/6 reflector with me the second night and I still couldn't see it. One of the problems I had was that there was so much stuff in that part of the sky (the barred part of the LMC, stars galore and nebulae all over the place) I couldn't make sense of what I was seeing even though I had pre-prepared a chart. In fact I was looking for, but not seeing, the comet. I agree with Con that the comet is one of the Greats and was truly a jaw dropper before Xmas. It'd be superb if our northern friends could spot it with binos but I wouldn't hold my breath!
        BTW you may have already seen this but here's a collection of pix taken by ASV members: http://asv.org.au/lovejoy.php

        --Geoff
        http://www.asv.org.au

        --- In comets-ml@yahoogroups.com, "Rob" <Rob.Kau@...> wrote:
        >
        > Clear skies and gave it one more go. The tail appears to extend to a length of 32 degrees. There is the vaguest hint of it continuing to the Milky Way but I think it's star alignments doing it, as on the 16th. Details on pic:
        > http://i727.photobucket.com/albums/ww271/Rob_Kau/C2011W318Jan2012invertfulltextsm.jpg
        >
        > Here's the normally-processed version, with the comet barely visible:
        > http://i727.photobucket.com/albums/ww271/Rob_Kau/C2011W318Jan201211-34UTredsm.jpg
        >
        > Here's a link to Lester Barnes' composite widefield from 16 Jan, showing about 35 degrees of tail and no extension to or through the Milky Way:
        > http://i638.photobucket.com/albums/uu109/Lester_045/Comet%20images/38c7df7a.jpg
        >
        > Cheers -
        >
        > Rob Kaufman
        > Bright, Victoria, Australia
        >
      • Ian Cooper
        Hi Geoff, on Tuesday, Jan 17th at around 11.00 hrs U.T. (midnight local Daylight Time) the sky cleared to almost 100% for several hours. Once I was fully dark
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 19, 2012
          Hi Geoff,

          on Tuesday, Jan 17th at around 11.00 hrs U.T. (midnight local Daylight Time) the sky cleared to almost 100% for several hours. Once I was fully dark adapated and using my 10 x 50 Nikon Lookout IV binoculars, I could easily trace the tail out to around two FOV's, about 13 - 14 degrees. Transparency was 8/10. The comet was about an hour past the meidian but was sitting at around 70 degrees in altitude. I agree that if the comet had been sitting down in the bottom ten degrees above the horizon, I doubt that it would have been detectable in the same pair of bino's.

          It has suddenly cleared here at dusk after being cloudy all day. If it sustains I will give it another go. It is however a westerly. Astronomers around here have a saying, "Never trust a westerly!" I'll keep you posted either way.

          Cheers

          Coops

          Glen Oroua
          Manawatu,
          New Zealand

          p.s. I concur with Geoff regarding the images of Rob & Lester.


          ----- Original Message -----
          From: GD
          To: comets-ml@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Thursday, January 19, 2012 9:09 PM
          Subject: [comets-ml] Re: Lovejoy tail 32 degrees, 18 Jan 2012



          Awesome pics, Rob.

          I went hunting for it from two dark spots in central Victoria that I know (one of them the LMDSS where the sky was not only dark but the air exceptionally steady), however on both nights the comet was invisible in 7x50s. I had my 8 inch f/6 reflector with me the second night and I still couldn't see it. One of the problems I had was that there was so much stuff in that part of the sky (the barred part of the LMC, stars galore and nebulae all over the place) I couldn't make sense of what I was seeing even though I had pre-prepared a chart. In fact I was looking for, but not seeing, the comet. I agree with Con that the comet is one of the Greats and was truly a jaw dropper before Xmas. It'd be superb if our northern friends could spot it with binos but I wouldn't hold my breath!
          BTW you may have already seen this but here's a collection of pix taken by ASV members: http://asv.org.au/lovejoy.php

          --Geoff
          http://www.asv.org.au

          --- In comets-ml@yahoogroups.com, "Rob" <Rob.Kau@...> wrote:
          >
          > Clear skies and gave it one more go. The tail appears to extend to a length of 32 degrees. There is the vaguest hint of it continuing to the Milky Way but I think it's star alignments doing it, as on the 16th. Details on pic:
          > http://i727.photobucket.com/albums/ww271/Rob_Kau/C2011W318Jan2012invertfulltextsm.jpg
          >
          > Here's the normally-processed version, with the comet barely visible:
          > http://i727.photobucket.com/albums/ww271/Rob_Kau/C2011W318Jan201211-34UTredsm.jpg
          >
          > Here's a link to Lester Barnes' composite widefield from 16 Jan, showing about 35 degrees of tail and no extension to or through the Milky Way:
          > http://i638.photobucket.com/albums/uu109/Lester_045/Comet%20images/38c7df7a.jpg
          >
          > Cheers -
          >
          > Rob Kaufman
          > Bright, Victoria, Australia
          >






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