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RE: [comets-ml] Sungrazer-CME statistical analysis

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  • Matson, Robert D.
    Hi Jakub/Jean, I ve checked all the Kreutz comets for 2009 (the last year that has Kreutz comet perihelion date information) against all the CMEs from that
    Message 1 of 32 , Oct 5, 2011
      Hi Jakub/Jean,

      I've checked all the Kreutz comets for 2009 (the last year that has
      Kreutz comet perihelion date information) against all the CMEs from
      that year. Here are the preliminary stats:

      # of comets: 142
      # of CMEs: 746
      Average time between CMEs: 11.71 hours

      Of the 142 comets, 57 (40%) had perihelions within +/- 3 hours of a CME,
      which is not statistically significant. 26 comets (18%) had perihelions
      within +/- 1 hour of a CME -- about what one would expect from random
      chance. However, 17 comets (12%) had perihelions within +/- 30 minutes
      of a CME. This ~is~ about 5 more comets than one would expect from
      chance. This could still be a random fluke given the small sample size;
      data from additional years will need to be processed to see if there
      is an actual signal hiding in the randomness. --Rob
    • David Seargent
      I wondered about this as well, but it seems that the comets precede the CMEs, which makes this appear less likely. Regards, David Seargent To:
      Message 32 of 32 , Oct 8, 2011
        I wondered about this as well, but it seems that the comets precede the CMEs, which makes this appear less likely.

        Regards,

        David Seargent






        To: comets-ml@yahoogroups.com
        From: rodcomet@...
        Date: Sat, 8 Oct 2011 19:17:52 +1300
        Subject: Re: [comets-ml] Re: Sungrazer comets and CMEs revisited (again)






        Seems to me however, that the coincidence of CMEs and the visibility of
        Sungrazers could simply be that the effects of CMEs could extend further
        than the visible images and those effects manifest themselves as greater
        activity on the comet nucleus. The comet might have been intrinsically much
        fainter than they appear during the CMEs.

        Regards
        Rod

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