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RE: [comets-ml] Re: Sungrazing Comets

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  • Mike Mattei
    Well John you are bringing back memories of 14 years ago and I remember Hyakutake well, it passed over head here and one night when I was working at the
    Message 1 of 9 , Sep 26, 2010
      Well John you are bringing back memories of 14 years ago and I remember
      Hyakutake well, it passed over head here and one night when I was working at
      the Wallace Observatory of MIT I was getting ready for some students to
      observe, they were all excited about the comet. About midnight it was cloudy
      and we decided to close the observatory since there was no hope of clearing
      and we left. When I go home the sky was beautify clear and directly over
      head was the comet, spectacular, a large hear with green and bluish color
      never before had I seen color by just looking up and the tail stretched to
      the eastern horizon.

      I must say that I had never seen a comet as close up as this but I hope I
      can see one again.



      Mike Mattei



      _____

      From: comets-ml@yahoogroups.com [mailto:comets-ml@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
      Of jbortle@...
      Sent: Tuesday, October 26, 2010 9:23 AM
      To: comets-ml@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [comets-ml] Re: Sungrazing Comets







      --- In comets-ml@yahoogroups.com <mailto:comets-ml%40yahoogroups.com> ,
      Rodney Austin <rodcomet@...> wrote:
      >
      > I watched Hyakutake from Norfolk Island in the middle of the north Tasman
      > Sea. 800 kilometres from anywhere, and only one streetlight on the island
      at
      > that time!!!
      > The tail reached out about 70 degrees; twice as long as Ikeya-Seki as I
      saw
      > it. However, nowhere near as bright. No real comparison. The head was also
      > much larger, compared to Ikeya-Seki which was small and very
      > condensed. Hyakutake was of course, right next door too.
      >
      > Rod Austin
      >
      >
      Since we are telling stories regarding Ikeya-Seki and other Great Comets,
      let me pass on some observations of mine that perhaps can at least in some
      small sense convey the uniqueness of the Great Sungrazing Comet of 1965.

      First off, let me say that I was fortunate to have had a string of clear
      nights when Hyakutake passed nearest Earth and so had several opportunities
      to view it at its very best under a dark sky. For overall impressiveness
      regarding brightness, tail length and particularly celestial position as
      seen from Earth's northern latitudes, it was undoubtedly the most
      spectacular comet in perhaps a millennium. HOWEVER, it simply had the naked
      eye appearance of a more common, small, comet magnified to enormous
      dimensions in the heavens: a round, well condensed head trailing a long,
      relatively faint, gossamer tail

      It was also my good fortune to view Ikeya-Seki on a series of mornings under
      similar sky conditions back in '65 beginning about a week after perihelion
      passage. Throughout that interval it was possible each morning to distinctly
      see just the first 1-2 degrees of the VERY END of the comets' tail rising
      over distant hills on the horizon, so bright was this feature. A fellow
      observer of considerable experience, arriving at the observing site just as
      this was occurring, on stepping out of his car and gazing southeastward
      exclaimed, "My God, John, that's incredible!"

      As the tail rose further into the sky, its general appearance was like that
      of a well defined, bright, searchlight beam. Unlike typical bright, naked
      eye, comets, the tail had an almost solid appearance to it with the unaided
      eye and one could easily discern exactly where the tail terminated
      (actually, the point where the post-perihelion dust ejecta phase had begun).


      A few mornings later, at the same site, I watched the comet rise fully
      before a ground fog began to come up. The fog increased in density to the
      point where all stars fainter than 3rd magnitude were totally obscured.
      HOWEVER, the comet's tail was so bright that its appearance to the naked eye
      was not in the least affected, with its full 23-degree length clearly
      apparent! In 50+ years of comet observing I've never seen anything similar.

      J.Bortle





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • jbortle@aol.com
      It is particularly interesting to me to see that there is a fairly bright pygmy sungrazer rapidly approaching the Sun from the southwest in this afternoon s
      Message 2 of 9 , Oct 20, 2010
        It is particularly interesting to me to see that there is a fairly bright pygmy sungrazer rapidly approaching the Sun from the southwest in this afternoon's SOHO images. Exactly 45 years ago today the Great Sungrazing Comet of 1965 (Ikeya-Seki) occupied almost the exact same position in the sky. But in the case of that grand object, it blazed forth with an apparent magnitude of around -8. Today's visitor looks to be near perhaps +3 at the moment.

        Those who were not around to personally witness the Great Comet of 1965 as it backed out into the morning sky in the days following its perihelion passage missed a truly unique and wonderful sight. The big Kreutz sungrazing comets look distinctly different from all other comets and, in my opinion, decidedly more impressive.

        J.Bortle
      • David Nicholls
        On 21/10/10 6:38 AM, jbortle@aol.com wrote: ... I endorse those sentiments. I have been lucky to see McNaught and Ikeya-Seki (among others). McNaught was
        Message 3 of 9 , Oct 20, 2010
          On 21/10/10 6:38 AM, jbortle@... wrote:
          ...
          > Those who were not around to personally witness the Great Comet of
          > 1965 as it backed out into the morning sky in the days following its
          > perihelion passage missed a truly unique and wonderful sight. ...
          >
          > J.Bortle

          I endorse those sentiments. I have been lucky to see McNaught and
          Ikeya-Seki (among others). McNaught was beautiful, Ikeya-Seki was
          awe-inspiring.

          DN
        • Rodney Austin
          Thanks to fairly poor weather, I didn t get to see Ikeya-Seki until November 1,1965. By that time it had faded markedly and the head was relatively faint, but
          Message 4 of 9 , Oct 23, 2010
            Thanks to fairly poor weather, I didn't get to see Ikeya-Seki until November
            1,1965. By that time it had faded markedly and the head was relatively
            faint, but the tail... Well that was something else - it took two hours for
            the comet to rise here in New Zealand. McNaught was truly beautiful and
            impressive, but Happ-Bopp was just a darned gob-smacker; a great brute of a
            hammer-blow. I got to see it at its best from Hale Pohaku about halfway up
            Mauna Kea. Worth every cent I spent on the trip.
            Rod Austin

            On Thu, Oct 21, 2010 at 12:22 PM, David Nicholls <dcn@...> wrote:

            >
            >
            > On 21/10/10 6:38 AM, jbortle@... <jbortle%40aol.com> wrote:
            > ...
            >
            > > Those who were not around to personally witness the Great Comet of
            > > 1965 as it backed out into the morning sky in the days following its
            > > perihelion passage missed a truly unique and wonderful sight. ...
            > >
            > > J.Bortle
            >
            > I endorse those sentiments. I have been lucky to see McNaught and
            > Ikeya-Seki (among others). McNaught was beautiful, Ikeya-Seki was
            > awe-inspiring.
            >
            > DN
            >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Michael Doyle
            In overall effect, how was C/1996 B2 Hyakutake on the 2 nights during its close pass to Earth compared to Ikeya-Seki? I rather doubt I ll live to see another
            Message 5 of 9 , Oct 24, 2010
              In overall effect, how was C/1996 B2 Hyakutake on the 2 nights during its
              close pass to Earth compared to Ikeya-Seki?

              I rather doubt I'll live to see another single celestial object occupy
              that much of the sky. And that "unearthly" glow!!! I had the fortune of
              living in central Texas at the time and drove out to West Texas in order
              to view Hyakutake. Some of the best loss of sleep I've ever done...

              Michael Doyle
              Charlottesville, Virginia

              > Thanks to fairly poor weather, I didn't get to see Ikeya-Seki until
              > November
              > 1,1965. By that time it had faded markedly and the head was relatively
              > faint, but the tail... Well that was something else - it took two hours
              > for
              > the comet to rise here in New Zealand. McNaught was truly beautiful and
              > impressive, but Happ-Bopp was just a darned gob-smacker; a great brute of
              > a
              > hammer-blow. I got to see it at its best from Hale Pohaku about halfway up
              > Mauna Kea. Worth every cent I spent on the trip.
              > Rod Austin
              >
              > On Thu, Oct 21, 2010 at 12:22 PM, David Nicholls <dcn@...>
              > wrote:
              >
              >>
              >>
              >> On 21/10/10 6:38 AM, jbortle@... <jbortle%40aol.com> wrote:
              >> ...
              >>
              >> > Those who were not around to personally witness the Great Comet of
              >> > 1965 as it backed out into the morning sky in the days following its
              >> > perihelion passage missed a truly unique and wonderful sight. ...
              >> >
              >> > J.Bortle
              >>
              >> I endorse those sentiments. I have been lucky to see McNaught and
              >> Ikeya-Seki (among others). McNaught was beautiful, Ikeya-Seki was
              >> awe-inspiring.
              >>
              >> DN
              >>
            • Rodney Austin
              I watched Hyakutake from Norfolk Island in the middle of the north Tasman Sea. 800 kilometres from anywhere, and only one streetlight on the island at that
              Message 6 of 9 , Oct 25, 2010
                I watched Hyakutake from Norfolk Island in the middle of the north Tasman
                Sea. 800 kilometres from anywhere, and only one streetlight on the island at
                that time!!!
                The tail reached out about 70 degrees; twice as long as Ikeya-Seki as I saw
                it. However, nowhere near as bright. No real comparison. The head was also
                much larger, compared to Ikeya-Seki which was small and very
                condensed. Hyakutake was of course, right next door too.
                Rod Austin

                On Mon, Oct 25, 2010 at 8:33 AM, Michael Doyle <gmike@...> wrote:

                >
                >
                > In overall effect, how was C/1996 B2 Hyakutake on the 2 nights during its
                > close pass to Earth compared to Ikeya-Seki?
                >
                > I rather doubt I'll live to see another single celestial object occupy
                > that much of the sky. And that "unearthly" glow!!! I had the fortune of
                > living in central Texas at the time and drove out to West Texas in order
                > to view Hyakutake. Some of the best loss of sleep I've ever done...
                >
                > Michael Doyle
                > Charlottesville, Virginia
                >
                >
                > > Thanks to fairly poor weather, I didn't get to see Ikeya-Seki until
                > > November
                > > 1,1965. By that time it had faded markedly and the head was relatively
                > > faint, but the tail... Well that was something else - it took two hours
                > > for
                > > the comet to rise here in New Zealand. McNaught was truly beautiful and
                > > impressive, but Happ-Bopp was just a darned gob-smacker; a great brute of
                > > a
                > > hammer-blow. I got to see it at its best from Hale Pohaku about halfway
                > up
                > > Mauna Kea. Worth every cent I spent on the trip.
                > > Rod Austin
                > >
                > > On Thu, Oct 21, 2010 at 12:22 PM, David Nicholls <dcn@...<dcn%40dcnicholls.com>
                > >
                > > wrote:
                > >
                > >>
                > >>
                > >> On 21/10/10 6:38 AM, jbortle@... <jbortle%40aol.com> <jbortle%
                > 40aol.com> wrote:
                > >> ...
                > >>
                > >> > Those who were not around to personally witness the Great Comet of
                > >> > 1965 as it backed out into the morning sky in the days following its
                > >> > perihelion passage missed a truly unique and wonderful sight. ...
                > >> >
                > >> > J.Bortle
                > >>
                > >> I endorse those sentiments. I have been lucky to see McNaught and
                > >> Ikeya-Seki (among others). McNaught was beautiful, Ikeya-Seki was
                > >> awe-inspiring.
                > >>
                > >> DN
                > >>
                >
                >
                >


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • jbortle@aol.com
                ... Since we are telling stories regarding Ikeya-Seki and other Great Comets, let me pass on some observations of mine that perhaps can at least in some small
                Message 7 of 9 , Oct 26, 2010
                  --- In comets-ml@yahoogroups.com, Rodney Austin <rodcomet@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I watched Hyakutake from Norfolk Island in the middle of the north Tasman
                  > Sea. 800 kilometres from anywhere, and only one streetlight on the island at
                  > that time!!!
                  > The tail reached out about 70 degrees; twice as long as Ikeya-Seki as I saw
                  > it. However, nowhere near as bright. No real comparison. The head was also
                  > much larger, compared to Ikeya-Seki which was small and very
                  > condensed. Hyakutake was of course, right next door too.
                  >
                  > Rod Austin
                  >
                  >
                  Since we are telling stories regarding Ikeya-Seki and other Great Comets, let me pass on some observations of mine that perhaps can at least in some small sense convey the uniqueness of the Great Sungrazing Comet of 1965.

                  First off, let me say that I was fortunate to have had a string of clear nights when Hyakutake passed nearest Earth and so had several opportunities to view it at its very best under a dark sky. For overall impressiveness regarding brightness, tail length and particularly celestial position as seen from Earth's northern latitudes, it was undoubtedly the most spectacular comet in perhaps a millennium. HOWEVER, it simply had the naked eye appearance of a more common, small, comet magnified to enormous dimensions in the heavens: a round, well condensed head trailing a long, relatively faint, gossamer tail

                  It was also my good fortune to view Ikeya-Seki on a series of mornings under similar sky conditions back in '65 beginning about a week after perihelion passage. Throughout that interval it was possible each morning to distinctly see just the first 1-2 degrees of the VERY END of the comets' tail rising over distant hills on the horizon, so bright was this feature. A fellow observer of considerable experience, arriving at the observing site just as this was occurring, on stepping out of his car and gazing southeastward exclaimed, "My God, John, that's incredible!"

                  As the tail rose further into the sky, its general appearance was like that of a well defined, bright, searchlight beam. Unlike typical bright, naked eye, comets, the tail had an almost solid appearance to it with the unaided eye and one could easily discern exactly where the tail terminated (actually, the point where the post-perihelion dust ejecta phase had begun).

                  A few mornings later, at the same site, I watched the comet rise fully before a ground fog began to come up. The fog increased in density to the point where all stars fainter than 3rd magnitude were totally obscured. HOWEVER, the comet's tail was so bright that its appearance to the naked eye was not in the least affected, with its full 23-degree length clearly apparent! In 50+ years of comet observing I've never seen anything similar.

                  J.Bortle
                • P. Edward Murray
                  Can anyone comment on this? Thanks, Ed Murray NASA Science News for Oct. 27, 2010 A pair of unusual fireballs over Canada and the southeastern USA have
                  Message 8 of 9 , Oct 26, 2010
                    Can anyone comment on this?

                    Thanks,

                    Ed Murray

                    "NASA Science News for Oct. 27, 2010 "
                    "A pair of unusual fireballs over Canada and the southeastern USA have experts wondering if Comet Hartley 2 might produce a meteor shower in early November. "

                    FULL STORY at

                    http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2010/27oct_hartleyids/


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Juan Lacruz
                    The name wouldn t be Hartleyids, following the standard, it would be after the constellation where the radiant is. Best regards Juan Lacruz ... -- Eppur si
                    Message 9 of 9 , Oct 26, 2010
                      The name wouldn't be Hartleyids, following the standard, it would be after
                      the constellation where the radiant is.

                      Best regards
                      Juan Lacruz

                      On Wed, Oct 27, 2010 at 6:34 AM, P. Edward Murray <ed1ward2@...>wrote:

                      >
                      >
                      > Can anyone comment on this?
                      >
                      > Thanks,
                      >
                      > Ed Murray
                      >
                      > "NASA Science News for Oct. 27, 2010 "
                      > "A pair of unusual fireballs over Canada and the southeastern USA have
                      > experts wondering if Comet Hartley 2 might produce a meteor shower in early
                      > November. "
                      >
                      > FULL STORY at
                      >
                      > http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2010/27oct_hartleyids/
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                      >
                      >



                      --
                      Eppur si muove
                      ------------------------------------------------------------
                      Site http://www.lacanada.es
                      Nature http://lacanadawx.blogspot.com
                      Astro http://asteroblog.blogspot.com
                      Meteors http://cometeors.blogspot.com


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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