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OT - Help on CCD choice

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  • luca_buzzi@alice.it
    Dear list, sorry for this off-topic, but on the web I ve found almost nothing and surely some of you can help me on this. We would like to change our CCD
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 2, 2009
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      Dear list,
      sorry for this off-topic, but on the web I've found almost nothing and surely some of you can help me on this.
      We would like to change our CCD camera, and one of the options is the Apogee U9000, even if this CCD has antiblooming gates. Our main work is astromety of MPs and comets.
      Does any of you actually do astrometry with such a CCD?
      In particular, I would like to know if there is any problem regarding the astrometric precision in presence of an antiblooming gate.
      Thank you in advance for any advise.

      Best regards,
      Luca Buzzi
      # 204


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Juan Lacruz
      Luca, As far as I know, antiblooming works against linearity and is likely to affect the photometry of saturated targets, I don t think it may have any impact
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 2, 2009
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        Luca,
        As far as I know, antiblooming works against linearity and is likely to
        affect the photometry of saturated targets, I don't think it may have any
        impact on the astrometry though.

        Best regards
        Juan
        On Mon, Nov 2, 2009 at 4:21 PM, <luca_buzzi@...> wrote:

        >
        >
        > Dear list,
        > sorry for this off-topic, but on the web I've found almost nothing and
        > surely some of you can help me on this.
        > We would like to change our CCD camera, and one of the options is the
        > Apogee U9000, even if this CCD has antiblooming gates. Our main work is
        > astromety of MPs and comets.
        > Does any of you actually do astrometry with such a CCD?
        > In particular, I would like to know if there is any problem regarding the
        > astrometric precision in presence of an antiblooming gate.
        > Thank you in advance for any advise.
        >
        > Best regards,
        > Luca Buzzi
        > # 204
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >



        --
        Eppur si muove
        ------------------------------------------------------------
        Site http://www.lacanada.es
        Nature http://lacanadawx.blogspot.com
        Astro http://asteroblog.blogspot.com
        Meteors http://cometeors.blogspot.com


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • gvnn64@libero.it
        I agree with Juan, a wise use of the Astrometrica settings, regards the bright end of the magnitudes, should mitigate significantly the prpblem. Cheers,
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 3, 2009
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          I agree with Juan, a wise use of the "Astrometrica" settings, regards the bright end of the magnitudes, should mitigate significantly the prpblem.
          Cheers,
          Giovanni


          > Luca,
          > As far as I know, antiblooming works against linearity and is likely to
          > affect the photometry of saturated targets, I don't think it may have any
          > impact on the astrometry though.
          >
          > Best regards
          > Juan
          > On Mon, Nov 2, 2009 at 4:21 PM, <luca_buzzi@...> wrote:
          >
          > >
          > >
          > > Dear list,
          > > sorry for this off-topic, but on the web I've found almost nothing and
          > > surely some of you can help me on this.
          > > We would like to change our CCD camera, and one of the options is the
          > > Apogee U9000, even if this CCD has antiblooming gates. Our main work is
          > > astromety of MPs and comets.
          > > Does any of you actually do astrometry with such a CCD?
          > > In particular, I would like to know if there is any problem regarding the
          > > astrometric precision in presence of an antiblooming gate.
          > > Thank you in advance for any advise.
          > >
          > > Best regards,
          > > Luca Buzzi
          > > # 204
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          > --
          > Eppur si muove
          > ------------------------------------------------------------
          > Site http://www.lacanada.es
          > Nature http://lacanadawx.blogspot.com
          > Astro http://asteroblog.blogspot.com
          > Meteors http://cometeors.blogspot.com
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
        • buzzi_luca
          Hi Giovanni, yes, of course I will set the proper settings in Astrometrica, to avoid to take stars that are under/above a certain limit. But such a CCD can be
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 4, 2009
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            Hi Giovanni,
            yes, of course I will set the proper settings in Astrometrica, to avoid to take stars that are under/above a certain limit.
            But such a CCD can be considered to be linear between 10% and 90% of the dynamical range? I.e. inside this interval, is it equal to a CCD without anti-blooming gates?

            Regards,
            Luca


            --- In comets-ml@yahoogroups.com, "gvnn64\@...\.it" <gvnn64@...> wrote:
            >
            > I agree with Juan, a wise use of the "Astrometrica" settings, regards the bright end of the magnitudes, should mitigate significantly the prpblem.
            > Cheers,
            > Giovanni
            >
            >
            > > Luca,
            > > As far as I know, antiblooming works against linearity and is likely to
            > > affect the photometry of saturated targets, I don't think it may have any
            > > impact on the astrometry though.
            > >
            > > Best regards
            > > Juan
            > > On Mon, Nov 2, 2009 at 4:21 PM, <luca_buzzi@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > Dear list,
            > > > sorry for this off-topic, but on the web I've found almost nothing and
            > > > surely some of you can help me on this.
            > > > We would like to change our CCD camera, and one of the options is the
            > > > Apogee U9000, even if this CCD has antiblooming gates. Our main work is
            > > > astromety of MPs and comets.
            > > > Does any of you actually do astrometry with such a CCD?
            > > > In particular, I would like to know if there is any problem regarding the
            > > > astrometric precision in presence of an antiblooming gate.
            > > > Thank you in advance for any advise.
            > > >
            > > > Best regards,
            > > > Luca Buzzi
            > > > # 204
            > > >
            > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > --
            > > Eppur si muove
            > > ------------------------------------------------------------
            > > Site http://www.lacanada.es
            > > Nature http://lacanadawx.blogspot.com
            > > Astro http://asteroblog.blogspot.com
            > > Meteors http://cometeors.blogspot.com
            > >
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > >
            > >
            >
          • gvnn64@libero.it
            Hello Luca. ... IMHO it s better to constrain the dynamic range below 70%, or at least this was my esperience with a Starlight Xpress CCD I used for some time
            Message 5 of 5 , Nov 4, 2009
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              Hello Luca.

              > But such a CCD can be considered to be linear between 10% and 90% of the dynamical range? I.e. inside this interval, is it equal to a CCD without anti-blooming gates?

              IMHO it's better to constrain the dynamic range below 70%, or at least this was my esperience with a Starlight Xpress CCD I used for some time for astrometrical purposes. Anyway you need to test the performances of this particular chip, since I suspect that each device has its own peculiarities.

              Bye,
              Giovanni
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