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C/2009 F6 (Yi-SWAN) on 2009 March 25 !!!

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  • Korotkiy Stanislav
    Stanislav Korotkiy (Ka-Dar obs., Moscow, Russia) reports that during the patrol photographic survey of the Milky Way he photographed a comet C/2009 F6 on 2009
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 7, 2009
      Stanislav Korotkiy (Ka-Dar obs., Moscow, Russia) reports that during the patrol photographic survey of the Milky Way he photographed a comet C/2009 F6 on 2009 March 25, 01:26 UT (one day before discovery). He used Canon EOS 20D digital camera + 50-mm f/4 lens. Limiting magnitude was about 13m. During first processing of images no new objects was detected. After a publication of MPEC 2009-G21 that announced an orbit for a new comet C/2009 F6, the images was processed again and a comet was found near the calculated position.

      2009 UT R.A. (2000) Decl.
      Aug. 25.060 22 28 28.8 +48 45 14

      Image scale was 25"/pix, astrometry precision +/- 4". The magnitude of a comet was estimated as 10.7 in G filter.

      Images: http://www.astroalert.su/2009/04/06/comet-swan-2009f6/
    • Maik Meyer
      Hi Stas, ... I already wondered how many earlier observations would be reported since the comet should have been easily observable in the preceding weeks.
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 7, 2009
        Hi Stas,

        > Stanislav Korotkiy (Ka-Dar obs., Moscow, Russia) reports that during the patrol
        > photographic survey of the Milky Way he photographed a comet C/2009 F6 on 2009
        > March 25, 01:26 UT (one day before discovery). He used Canon EOS 20D digital

        I already wondered how many earlier observations would be reported since the comet
        should have been easily observable in the preceding weeks. Maybe it has
        experienced an outburst.

        Congratulations to your prediscovery observation! Bad luck you didn't notice the
        comet earlier!

        Cheers, Maik
        --
        If they give you ruled paper, write the other way. * Juan Ramon Jimenez
        ________________________________________________________________________
        maik@... http://www.comethunter.de
        International Comet Quarterly http://cfa-www.harvard.edu/icq/icq.html
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/comets-ml
      • Denis Denisenko
        Hello all! ... Maybe we will know soon! Bill Dillon of AAVSO has an image of SS Cyg around Mar. 16.5 UT when the comet was located less than 9 (0.15 deg)
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 9, 2009
          Hello all!

          Maik Meyer wrote:

          > I already wondered how many earlier observations would be reported
          > since the comet should have been easily observable in the preceding
          > weeks. Maybe it has experienced an outburst.

          Maybe we will know soon! Bill Dillon of AAVSO has an image of SS Cyg
          around Mar. 16.5 UT when the comet was located less than 9' (0.15 deg)
          from this famous cataclysmic variable. (Note: 9' according to the
          nominal ephemeris still based on a short arc!) SS Cyg itself was at
          magnitude 11.3 then fading from a recent outburst. So, depending on the
          image depth, we will have either the earliest observation of this comet,
          or the upper limit on its brightness ten days before the detection from
          Caucasus and Korea.

          Rob, Maik and other SWAN comet hunters: why was the comet not detected
          by SWAN before March 29, while the ground-based observers have imaged it
          on March 25 and 26? Was the comet too faint, or there are just no
          images available? Solar elongation was nearly the same.

          Maik Meyer wrote to Stanislav Korotkiy:

          > Congratulations to your prediscovery observation! Bad luck you didn't
          > notice the comet earlier!

          That's the most bad luck, indeed, since Stas and me have already
          "discovered" C/2006 W3 Christensen this January using the same setup.
          Without knowing the position of comet in advance, we have easily
          identified it by blinking two images taken on two different nights. It
          was then located almost in the same part of Milky Way at Cygnus-Lacerta
          border. But this time Stas just didn't have the second night to detect
          the motion of the comet. With 1 degree per day it would have been obvious.

          Den in Moscow
        • Matson, Robert D.
          Hi Den, ... it ... Comet must have been too faint. There were images for 3/28, 3/26 and 3/24, but it definitely wasn t visible in them. --Rob
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 9, 2009
            Hi Den,

            Regarding the SWAN detection of C/2009 F6, you asked:

            > Rob, Maik and other SWAN comet hunters: why was the comet not detected

            > by SWAN before March 29, while the ground-based observers have imaged
            it
            > on March 25 and 26? Was the comet too faint, or there are just no
            > images available? Solar elongation was nearly the same.

            Comet must have been too faint. There were images for 3/28, 3/26 and
            3/24,
            but it definitely wasn't visible in them. --Rob
          • Charles Bell
            Could you provide a link to where recent SWAN images can be seen? and perhaps a few words about what it really is one is looking at with them and how to make
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 9, 2009
              Could you provide a link to where recent SWAN images can be seen?
              and perhaps a few words about what it really is one is looking at with them and how to make sense of it.

              I would be very grateful. Perhaps others are wondering the same thing.

              I applaud all your work finding stuff in those images.

              Do they provide FITS images or does one have to convert their images into FITS format?

              How do you screen out all the cosmic ray hits on those SOHO, STEREO and SWAN images or get an accurate astrometric position?

              How anyone can determine an accurate astrometric position with those images must be very difficult with all the difficulties associated with the field of view.

              C. Bell H47 Vicksburg




               



              ________________________________
              From: "Matson, Robert D." <matsonr@...>
              To: comets-ml@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Thursday, April 9, 2009 4:03:28 PM
              Subject: [comets-ml] C/2009 F6 visibility in SWAN





              Hi Den,

              Regarding the SWAN detection of C/2009 F6, you asked:

              > Rob, Maik and other SWAN comet hunters: why was the comet not detected

              > by SWAN before March 29, while the ground-based observers have imaged
              it
              > on March 25 and 26? Was the comet too faint, or there are just no
              > images available? Solar elongation was nearly the same.

              Comet must have been too faint. There were images for 3/28, 3/26 and
              3/24,
              but it definitely wasn't visible in them. --Rob



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