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Re: Final Nakedeye Observation of 17P?

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  • Piotr Guzik
    Hi All, Last night (Feb. 24th) I still could see 17P with naked eye. At first I observed it from my backyard. Conditions were very good - I could see stars
    Message 1 of 18 , Feb 25, 2008
      Hi All,

      Last night (Feb. 24th) I still could see 17P with naked eye. At first
      I observed it from my backyard. Conditions were very good - I could
      see stars down to about 6.8 mag, M33 and zodiacal light were clearly
      visible with naked eyes. The comet was just visible to naked eye as
      ~60' very diffuse round object ~5 mag.

      Later (~19 UT) I drove 15 km from my backyard to definitely darker
      place (I'd say Bortle Class 2/3). The Milky Way in Puppis was visible
      to about 10 degrees above horizon. NELM was definitely better than
      7.0 mag as I could see GSC 4384 1160 (7.1 mag) with averted vision.

      There the comet looked much better. It was still noticeable without
      much difficulty as ~4.5 mag round object approximately 100' in
      diameter (though it was rough estimate).

      Best Regards
      Piotr Guzik
    • martin mc kenna
      Hi all Comet 17P/Holmes can still be seen fairly easy with the naked eye using direct vision when the sky conditions are good. Even last night at 00.30 UT when
      Message 2 of 18 , Feb 27, 2008
        Hi all

        Comet 17P/Holmes can still be seen fairly easy with the naked eye using direct vision when the sky conditions are good. Even last night at 00.30 UT when Perseus was low in the sky 17P was still detectable. Easy in binos but more difficult in a telescope.

        A few wide field images (scroll down) from myself and John McConnell...

        http://www.nightskyhunter.com/Sky%20Events%20Now.html

        Sketch of 46P/Wirtanen...

        http://www.nightskyhunter.com/Comet-70-70.html

        Mag: 9.0 Dia: 6' D.C: 3

        Martin Mc Kenna
        N. Ireland

        Piotr Guzik <g22@...> wrote:
        Hi All,

        Last night (Feb. 24th) I still could see 17P with naked eye. At first
        I observed it from my backyard. Conditions were very good - I could
        see stars down to about 6.8 mag, M33 and zodiacal light were clearly
        visible with naked eyes. The comet was just visible to naked eye as
        ~60' very diffuse round object ~5 mag.

        Later (~19 UT) I drove 15 km from my backyard to definitely darker
        place (I'd say Bortle Class 2/3). The Milky Way in Puppis was visible
        to about 10 degrees above horizon. NELM was definitely better than
        7.0 mag as I could see GSC 4384 1160 (7.1 mag) with averted vision.

        There the comet looked much better. It was still noticeable without
        much difficulty as ~4.5 mag round object approximately 100' in
        diameter (though it was rough estimate).

        Best Regards
        Piotr Guzik






        http://www.nightskyhunter.com/


        ---------------------------------
        Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Kenneth Drake
        I ve tried seeing Holmes naked eye a number of times since my last positive NE view on January 29th from dark Ft. Griffin. Until last night, all have been
        Message 3 of 18 , Feb 29, 2008
          I've tried seeing Holmes naked eye a number of times since my last
          positive NE view on January 29th from dark Ft. Griffin. Until last
          night, all have been negative. I got home from work near 8:00 last night
          and astronomical twilight had been ended about 20 minutes. The sky
          looked like it had evaporated the clouds that had washed in from the
          south during the day so I thought I would give comet Holmes another
          look. I was standing just outside my back door to the garage looking up
          at the location of the comet. Holmes was up about 60 degrees up to the
          west northwest and I was using my hands to block the extraneous light
          leaking around trees from a neighbors "yard light" 200 meters away. Like
          a dummy, I then realized that I could use the corner of the eave I was
          under to block 3/4 of the sky and my arms and hands to block the
          remaining 25%. What was left was a small hole (~10 degree) where only
          the light from the area of sky Holmes occupied was visible. I was rather
          shocked to see Holmes appear as a very soft, round, weak glow just
          slightly over half a degree in diameter using averted vision. The comet
          disappeared with direct vision. It formed a shallow triangle with the
          bright stars Xi and Epsilon. The 5.5 magnitude stars SAO 56628 and 56675
          were beacons with direst vision. I did not notice the 6.6 mag SAO 56730
          embedded in the glow of the comet. I consider my skies good but not
          great (Bortle Class 5) and it may have helped that Holmes was placed in
          the best part of my sky - looking away from all light pollution. I hope
          others can use this trick.

          Kenneth (drako) Drake


          cnj999 wrote:
          >
          > I think I can say with some confidence that the sighting I made of
          > 17P/Holmes about half an hour ago (Feb. 11.01UT) will be my last,
          > barring some new outburst. The comet was at the extreme limit of
          > averted vision for me, in my typically less than perfectly dark skies.
          > It seemd to subtend roughly 2 degrees and was essentially circular in
          > outline. At the same time, 15x70 binoculars still rather easily showed
          > the comet, although not to the full diameter evident with the unaided
          > eye.
          >
          > >From here on, the waxing moon will likely hide the comet from the view
          > of most, until at least Fenruary 22nd, by which time I would not expect
          > it to be detectable with the nakedeye any longer, even under the best
          > of skies.
          >
          > I'd certainly be interested in hearing how others are faring at this
          > point, especially without optical aid. 17P has certainly put on one
          > heck of a show...one of the most menorable in my 50+ years of comet
          > observing.
          >
          > JBortle
          >
          >
        • Gabor Santa
          Hello, I have seen Comet Holmes to the naked eye at 2nd March next to Szeged, Hungary. Location was at about 5 km NW to the city. Clear sky after cold front.
          Message 4 of 18 , Mar 3, 2008
            Hello,

            I have seen Comet Holmes to the naked eye at 2nd March next to Szeged,
            Hungary. Location was at about 5 km NW to the city. Clear sky after cold
            front. Light pollution was low, background 20,5 mag/sq" (SQM data).

            March 2,75 UT:
            m1=5.0:, D=1deg:, DC=0, naked eye

            Clear skies,

            Gábor
            Szeged, Hungary
          • Alfredo Pereira
            ... Hello Gabor, For the benefit of all of us interested, could you (and all those currently publishing _naked eye_ estimates for this object) please be so
            Message 5 of 18 , Mar 3, 2008
              >Gabor Santa wrote:
              > I have seen Comet Holmes to the naked eye at 2nd March next to Szeged,
              > Hungary. Location was at about 5 km NW to the city. Clear sky after cold
              > front. Light pollution was low, background 20,5 mag/sq" (SQM data).
              >
              > March 2,75 UT:
              > m1=5.0:, D=1deg:, DC=0, naked eye

              Hello Gabor,

              For the benefit of all of us interested, could you (and all those currently
              publishing _naked eye_ estimates for this object) please be so kind as to
              describe which method you used to get this m1=5.0: value ? Thanks much.

              Cheers,

              Alfredo
              --
            • Gabor Santa
              ... Hi, The method was Sidgwick. Gabor
              Message 6 of 18 , Mar 4, 2008
                >>Gabor Santa wrote:
                >> I have seen Comet Holmes to the naked eye at 2nd March next to Szeged,
                >> Hungary. Location was at about 5 km NW to the city. Clear sky after cold
                >> front. Light pollution was low, background 20,5 mag/sq" (SQM data).
                >>
                >> March 2,75 UT:
                >> m1=5.0:, D=1deg:, DC=0, naked eye
                >
                > Hello Gabor,
                >
                > For the benefit of all of us interested, could you (and all those
                > currently
                > publishing _naked eye_ estimates for this object) please be so kind as to
                > describe which method you used to get this m1=5.0: value ? Thanks much.
                >
                > Cheers,
                >
                > Alfredo

                Hi,

                The method was Sidgwick.

                Gabor
              • Gabor Santa
                ... Hi, The method was Sidgwick. Gabor
                Message 7 of 18 , Mar 4, 2008
                  >>Gabor Santa wrote:
                  >> I have seen Comet Holmes to the naked eye at 2nd March next to Szeged,
                  >> Hungary. Location was at about 5 km NW to the city. Clear sky after cold
                  >> front. Light pollution was low, background 20,5 mag/sq" (SQM data).
                  >>
                  >> March 2,75 UT:
                  >> m1=5.0:, D=1deg:, DC=0, naked eye
                  >
                  > Hello Gabor,
                  >
                  > For the benefit of all of us interested, could you (and all those
                  > currently
                  > publishing _naked eye_ estimates for this object) please be so kind as to
                  > describe which method you used to get this m1=5.0: value ? Thanks much.
                  >
                  > Cheers,
                  >
                  > Alfredo

                  Hi,

                  The method was Sidgwick.

                  Gabor
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