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C/2006 P1 Observation

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  • McCann, Stephen
    2007 Jan 10.71 UT: m1=-1.8, Dia.=5 , DC=9, Tail: 3 deg. in PA 5 deg... NE...Stephen McCann (Southampton, England) Incredible sight from my northern latitude.
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 11, 2007
      2007 Jan 10.71 UT: m1=-1.8, Dia.=5', DC=9, Tail: 3 deg. in PA 5 deg...
      NE...Stephen McCann (Southampton, England)

      Incredible sight from my northern latitude. Estimate based on my myopic
      uncorrected eyes, Venus and Altair. Also checked estimate using reversed
      binoculars with Vega, Capella etc - just wish Sirius had risen.
      Additionally I only saw it in binoculars some 15 minutes after sunset,
      whereas Venus was visible immediately.

      Kind regards

      Stephen


      ________________________________

      From: comets-ml@yahoogroups.com
      [mailto:comets-ml@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of amar10sharmaa
      Sent: 11 January 2007 05:50
      To: comets-ml@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [comets-ml] Re: C2006 P1



      So can anyone make a quick estimate of it's peak brightness and
      max.
      tail length "atleast now" for 14th. the day forward scattering
      is
      calculated/supposed to take place? It must be getting the
      brightest
      on that day if I'm not mistaken?

      --- In comets-ml@yahoogroups.com
      <mailto:comets-ml%40yahoogroups.com> , "Dave Herald" <drherald@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Thought I would report my first sighting of this comet (and
      first
      midday comet observing!). Visual,
      > through the 5x 50mm finder of my Meade 14", 2 hours past
      transit,
      with the Sun higher than the comet
      > (with the Autostar returning a temperature of 115F 46C - not
      a 'shade' temperature, but it is a hot
      > day!)
      >
      > To reduce the glare from the Sun, I put a 40cm long cardboard
      tube
      in front of the finder. It made a
      > big difference.
      >
      > The comet is just 10.3 deg from the Sun. It was quite faint,
      and I
      wouldn't have found it without
      > the benefit of the accurate GoTo of my scope. In comparison,
      Venus
      was very easy to see - but it is
      > much further from the Sun. Size: In the 5x finder, Venus was
      very
      point-like; the comet was clearly
      > a small extended object. Magnitude estimate? Wouldn't have a
      clue -
      too many variables (such as
      > atmospheric transparency) with no sensible comparison
      available.
      Merely the fact that it is visible
      > at 10 deg elongation in a 50mm finder.
      >
      > Dave Herald
      > Canberra, Australia
      >






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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • amar10sharmaa
      Just waiting to see it from 13 deg.latitude. There may have been no reports so far from near the equator..most of them are from the Northerers..the visibility
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 11, 2007
        Just waiting to see it from 13 deg.latitude. There may have been no
        reports so far from near the equator..most of them are from the
        Northerers..the visibility status here looks little difficult,
        looking at Cartes du Ciel software shows that these few dates from
        today onwards until 15-16th. at the latest to be the 'best visible',
        this is also around the period when it'll be visible in SOHO images.
        On 14th we also have the conjunction between this one and Mercury
        which is visible for us at Sunset. Also hopefully forward scattering
        really takes form that day.

        Yesterday I attempted it with a 10x50 Olympus binoc., it was cloudy
        ONLY in that direction :( Whereas ALL these days since more than
        half to a full month when we didnt have McNaught visible for us, it
        was DEAD CLEAR!! Today it's at 7 degrees elongation from the Sun,
        and 5 degrees above it in altitude (hence some more time till it
        sets). 7 degrees means it should cramp in the fov of a 10x50 Olympus
        binoc what we have here (fov=6.5 deg.) I have more 16 hrs. till Sun
        sets here in India (it's past mid-night now) and will attempt to get
        our first ever glimpse of McNaught; we here have got not
        the "slightest idea" of what the many eyes world-wide are already
        feasting on it! Very sure not many here in this country will have
        seen it (or even know about it), observations will be mostly NONE!!

        Thanking You. Amar Sharma.


        --- In comets-ml@yahoogroups.com, "McCann, Stephen"
        <stephen.mccann@...> wrote:
        >
        > 2007 Jan 10.71 UT: m1=-1.8, Dia.=5', DC=9, Tail: 3 deg. in PA 5
        deg...
        > NE...Stephen McCann (Southampton, England)
        >
        > Incredible sight from my northern latitude. Estimate based on my
        myopic
        > uncorrected eyes, Venus and Altair. Also checked estimate using
        reversed
        > binoculars with Vega, Capella etc - just wish Sirius had risen.
        > Additionally I only saw it in binoculars some 15 minutes after
        sunset,
        > whereas Venus was visible immediately.
        >
        > Kind regards
        >
        > Stephen
        >
        >
        > ________________________________
        >
        > From: comets-ml@yahoogroups.com
        > [mailto:comets-ml@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of amar10sharmaa
        > Sent: 11 January 2007 05:50
        > To: comets-ml@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [comets-ml] Re: C2006 P1
        >
        >
        >
        > So can anyone make a quick estimate of it's peak brightness
        and
        > max.
        > tail length "atleast now" for 14th. the day forward
        scattering
        > is
        > calculated/supposed to take place? It must be getting the
        > brightest
        > on that day if I'm not mistaken?
        >
        > --- In comets-ml@yahoogroups.com
        > <mailto:comets-ml%40yahoogroups.com> , "Dave Herald" <drherald@>
        > wrote:
        > >
        > > Thought I would report my first sighting of this comet (and
        > first
        > midday comet observing!). Visual,
        > > through the 5x 50mm finder of my Meade 14", 2 hours past
        > transit,
        > with the Sun higher than the comet
        > > (with the Autostar returning a temperature of 115F 46C -
        not
        > a 'shade' temperature, but it is a hot
        > > day!)
        > >
        > > To reduce the glare from the Sun, I put a 40cm long
        cardboard
        > tube
        > in front of the finder. It made a
        > > big difference.
        > >
        > > The comet is just 10.3 deg from the Sun. It was quite
        faint,
        > and I
        > wouldn't have found it without
        > > the benefit of the accurate GoTo of my scope. In
        comparison,
        > Venus
        > was very easy to see - but it is
        > > much further from the Sun. Size: In the 5x finder, Venus
        was
        > very
        > point-like; the comet was clearly
        > > a small extended object. Magnitude estimate? Wouldn't have
        a
        > clue -
        > too many variables (such as
        > > atmospheric transparency) with no sensible comparison
        > available.
        > Merely the fact that it is visible
        > > at 10 deg elongation in a 50mm finder.
        > >
        > > Dave Herald
        > > Canberra, Australia
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > --
        > Roke Manor Research Ltd, Romsey,
        > Hampshire, SO51 0ZN, United Kingdom
        >
        > A Siemens company
        > Registered in England & Wales at:
        > Siemens House, Oldbury, Bracknell
        > Berks RG12 8FZ. Number 267550
        > -------------------------------------------------------------------
        -----
        > Visit our website at www.roke.co.uk
        > -------------------------------------------------------------------
        -----
        > The information contained in this e-mail and any attachments is
        > proprietary to Roke Manor Research Ltd and must not be passed to
        any
        > third party without permission. This communication is for
        information
        > only and shall not create or change any contractual relationship.
        > -------------------------------------------------------------------
        -----
        >
        > Please consider the environment before printing this email
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
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