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Toughest CoP situations - your call

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  • Matt Moore
    Hello, So I m reviewing/writing a course for KM Masters students that includes a session on CoPs. The key question is What might go wrong in a community of
    Message 1 of 15 , Aug 15, 2012
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      Hello,

      So I'm reviewing/writing a course for KM Masters students that includes a session on CoPs. The key question is "What might go wrong in a community of practice? Give ideas for strategies for supporting successful communities"

      While I recognise the first part of the question is a useful activity, I'd actually like to make this more concrete. Can any of you propose a scenario for my students to resolve? Feel free to be as mean as possible.

      Regards,

      Matt Moore
    • Miguel Cornejo
      ... Mission: fight entropy :-). Best regards, Miguel ... Hello, So I m reviewing/writing a course for KM Masters students that includes a session on CoPs. The
      Message 2 of 15 , Aug 15, 2012
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        :-) just two

        1. Wide CoP, volunteer based. For external reasons the engines (coordinator & main mods & even main content prducer) become passive in th same year, without perspective of recuperation. The CoP rumbles on some months but is very clearly losing activity and relevance. 

        2. My fave - clash between rules and custom. Sponsored CoP. A group of very active members disagrees with the common setup and agitates against the management team with the ultimate aim of splitting the CoP and taking away most of the membership to a new initiative. 

        Mission: fight entropy :-).

        Best regards,

        Miguel

        Enviado desde mi telefono

        El 15/08/2012, a las 12:51, Matt Moore <innotecture@yahoo .com> escribió:

         

        Hello,

        So I'm reviewing/writing a course for KM Masters students that includes a session on CoPs. The key question is "What might go wrong in a community of practice? Give ideas for strategies for supporting successful communities"

        While I recognise the first part of the question is a useful activity, I'd actually like to make this more concrete. Can any of you propose a scenario for my students to resolve? Feel free to be as mean as possible.

        Regards,

        Matt Moore

      • Matt Moore
        Love em! (well, as an observer, not so much as a community manager) keep em coming! ________________________________ From: Miguel Cornejo
        Message 3 of 15 , Aug 15, 2012
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          Love em! (well, as an observer, not so much as a community manager) keep em coming!


          From: Miguel Cornejo <macuarium@...>
          To: "com-prac@yahoogroups.com" <com-prac@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Wednesday, 15 August 2012 9:23 PM
          Subject: Re: [cp] Toughest CoP situations - your call

           


          :-) just two

          1. Wide CoP, volunteer based. For external reasons the engines (coordinator & main mods & even main content prducer) become passive in th same year, without perspective of recuperation. The CoP rumbles on some months but is very clearly losing activity and relevance. 

          2. My fave - clash between rules and custom. Sponsored CoP. A group of very active members disagrees with the common setup and agitates against the management team with the ultimate aim of splitting the CoP and taking away most of the membership to a new initiative. 

          Mission: fight entropy :-).

          Best regards,

          Miguel

          Enviado desde mi telefono

          El 15/08/2012, a las 12:51, Matt Moore <innotecture@yahoo .com> escribió:

           
          Hello,

          So I'm reviewing/writing a course for KM Masters students that includes a session on CoPs. The key question is "What might go wrong in a community of practice? Give ideas for strategies for supporting successful communities"

          While I recognise the first part of the question is a useful activity, I'd actually like to make this more concrete. Can any of you propose a scenario for my students to resolve? Feel free to be as mean as possible.

          Regards,

          Matt Moore


        • Jacqueline Saldana
          Hello Matt, I worked with global engineering CoPs I am completing my doctoral dissertation in the topic of CoPs. We have to remember that CoPs have a life
          Message 4 of 15 , Aug 15, 2012
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            Hello Matt,

            I worked with global engineering CoPs I am completing my doctoral dissertation in the topic of CoPs. We have to remember that CoPs have a life cycle aligned with the classical theory of life cycle (Smith et al., 1985, Wenger et al., 2004). This means that, when the CoP reaches a plato of production or complete a project for which it was created, unless champions keep alive the spirit of the CoP, it is condemned to disappear. The way CoPs are developing as part of professional organizations is also creating the phenomenon of "institutionalization" (Wenger et al.). This is "tricky" because is not other to put a structure and guidelines to CoP that is supposed to be fluid, organic, and self-organized. When this happens, as well, if organizations are not aware of what gives cohesion to the group, any attempt of institutionalization can make more wrong than good. Finally, meta-analysis with the emergent literature from 2000 to 2011 demonstrated that leadership IS an element that can promote CoPs to execute at higher levels, although the study of leadership among CoPs (remember CoPs are supposed to be a shared leadership organism) is almost inexistent. On the other hand, CoPs that achieved successful completion of projects and survived for longer time are those that developed strong sense of common purpose, reflective collaboration, negotiated enterprise, and professional networking.

            Cheers,

            Jackie

            Jackie Saldaña, MBA, CALLA, DM Learner
            Academia, Leadership, and Business Solutions
            "Corrective learning begins with the awakening of spirit, and the turning away from belief in physical sight." ("A Course in Miracles," p. 22). Let me share a holy instant with you.



            --- On Wed, 8/15/12, Matt Moore <innotecture@...> wrote:

            From: Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
            Subject: Re: [cp] Toughest CoP situations - your call
            To: "com-prac@yahoogroups.com" <com-prac@yahoogroups.com>
            Date: Wednesday, August 15, 2012, 11:29 AM

             

            Love em! (well, as an observer, not so much as a community manager) keep em coming!


            From: Miguel Cornejo <macuarium@...>
            To: "com-prac@yahoogroups.com" <com-prac@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Wednesday, 15 August 2012 9:23 PM
            Subject: Re: [cp] Toughest CoP situations - your call

             


            :-) just two

            1. Wide CoP, volunteer based. For external reasons the engines (coordinator & main mods & even main content prducer) become passive in th same year, without perspective of recuperation. The CoP rumbles on some months but is very clearly losing activity and relevance. 

            2. My fave - clash between rules and custom. Sponsored CoP. A group of very active members disagrees with the common setup and agitates against the management team with the ultimate aim of splitting the CoP and taking away most of the membership to a new initiative. 

            Mission: fight entropy :-).

            Best regards,

            Miguel

            Enviado desde mi telefono

            El 15/08/2012, a las 12:51, Matt Moore <innotecture@yahoo .com> escribió:

             
            Hello,

            So I'm reviewing/writing a course for KM Masters students that includes a session on CoPs. The key question is "What might go wrong in a community of practice? Give ideas for strategies for supporting successful communities"

            While I recognise the first part of the question is a useful activity, I'd actually like to make this more concrete. Can any of you propose a scenario for my students to resolve? Feel free to be as mean as possible.

            Regards,

            Matt Moore


          • Miguel Cornejo
            Well since you ask... CoP with a wide prosumer photography forum. You as manager are made aware that some family pictures shared by members are being
            Message 5 of 15 , Aug 15, 2012
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              Well since you ask...

              CoP with a wide "prosumer" photography forum. You as manager are made aware that some family pictures shared by members are being doctored and posted by someone in a (evidently external) extremely non-family-friendly forum; this second forum is based in Holland (very hard to act against them) and their managers enjoy the matter. 

              Users post the pictures in your service to share them with non-registered third parties, so making it closed is not an option. 

              Mission: protect the kid's images. 

              Enviado desde mi telefono

              El 15/08/2012, a las 13:29, Matt Moore <innotecture@...> escribió:

               

              Love em! (well, as an observer, not so much as a community manager) keep em coming!


              From: Miguel Cornejo <macuarium@...>
              To: "com-prac@yahoogroups.com" <com-prac@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Wednesday, 15 August 2012 9:23 PM
              Subject: Re: [cp] Toughest CoP situations - your call

               


              :-) just two

              1. Wide CoP, volunteer based. For external reasons the engines (coordinator & main mods & even main content prducer) become passive in th same year, without perspective of recuperation. The CoP rumbles on some months but is very clearly losing activity and relevance. 

              2. My fave - clash between rules and custom. Sponsored CoP. A group of very active members disagrees with the common setup and agitates against the management team with the ultimate aim of splitting the CoP and taking away most of the membership to a new initiative. 

              Mission: fight entropy :-).

              Best regards,

              Miguel

              Enviado desde mi telefono

              El 15/08/2012, a las 12:51, Matt Moore <innotecture@yahoo .com> escribió:

               
              Hello,

              So I'm reviewing/writing a course for KM Masters students that includes a session on CoPs. The key question is "What might go wrong in a community of practice? Give ideas for strategies for supporting successful communities"

              While I recognise the first part of the question is a useful activity, I'd actually like to make this more concrete. Can any of you propose a scenario for my students to resolve? Feel free to be as mean as possible.

              Regards,

              Matt Moore


            • Lee Romero
              I think this is similar to what Miguel has described but another challenge can be when a community is launched within an organization because it aligns with a
              Message 6 of 15 , Aug 15, 2012
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                I think this is similar to what Miguel has described but another challenge can be when a community is launched within an organization because it aligns with a particular area of business (as the organization aligns itself) - say a particular department.

                Later on, that department is re-organized (maybe merged with another group or split up or whatever).  The "community" is so closely aligned to the organization as it was, it loses steam.

                Or, similarly, the "community" is aligned to the particular business current structure and the people who are nominally part of the community don't align themselves in that way - meaning that there's no real community, but it's an organization which is trying to behave like a community.  The community never gains traction and never delivers value because the (potential?) members don't feel any affinity for the group.

                Lee

                On Wed, Aug 15, 2012 at 7:29 AM, Matt Moore <innotecture@...> wrote:


                Love em! (well, as an observer, not so much as a community manager) keep em coming!


                From: Miguel Cornejo <macuarium@...>
                To: "com-prac@yahoogroups.com" <com-prac@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Wednesday, 15 August 2012 9:23 PM
                Subject: Re: [cp] Toughest CoP situations - your call

                 


                :-) just two

                1. Wide CoP, volunteer based. For external reasons the engines (coordinator & main mods & even main content prducer) become passive in th same year, without perspective of recuperation. The CoP rumbles on some months but is very clearly losing activity and relevance. 

                2. My fave - clash between rules and custom. Sponsored CoP. A group of very active members disagrees with the common setup and agitates against the management team with the ultimate aim of splitting the CoP and taking away most of the membership to a new initiative. 

                Mission: fight entropy :-).

                Best regards,

                Miguel

                Enviado desde mi telefono

                El 15/08/2012, a las 12:51, Matt Moore <innotecture@yahoo .com> escribió:

                 
                Hello,

                So I'm reviewing/writing a course for KM Masters students that includes a session on CoPs. The key question is "What might go wrong in a community of practice? Give ideas for strategies for supporting successful communities"

                While I recognise the first part of the question is a useful activity, I'd actually like to make this more concrete. Can any of you propose a scenario for my students to resolve? Feel free to be as mean as possible.

                Regards,

                Matt Moore

              • peter bond
                When they realise they are a CoP AND a team at the same time? What to do, the text books are ambiguous on this. Pete ========================================
                Message 7 of 15 , Aug 15, 2012
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                  When they realise they are a CoP AND a team at the same time? What to do, the text books are ambiguous on this.

                  Pete


                  ========================================
                  Message Received: Aug 15 2012, 12:24 PM
                  From: "Miguel Cornejo"
                  To: "com-prac@yahoogroups.com"
                  Cc:
                  Subject: Re: [cp] Toughest CoP situations - your call



                  > :-) just two
                  >
                  > 1. Wide CoP, volunteer based. For external reasons the engines (coordinator & main mods & even main content prducer) become passive in th same year, without perspective of recuperation. The CoP rumbles on some months but is very clearly losing activity and relevance.
                  >
                  > 2. My fave - clash between rules and custom. Sponsored CoP. A group of very active members disagrees with the common setup and agitates against the management team with the ultimate aim of splitting the CoP and taking away most of the membership to a new initiative.

                  Mission: fight entropy :-).

                  Best regards,

                  Miguel
                  >
                  > Enviado desde mi telefono
                  >
                  > El 15/08/2012, a las 12:51, Matt Moore escribió:
                  >
                  >> Hello,
                  >>
                  >> So I'm reviewing/writing a course for KM Masters students that includes a session on CoPs. The key question is "What might go wrong in a community of practice? Give ideas for strategies for supporting successful communities"
                  >>
                  >> While I recognise the first part of the question is a useful activity, I'd actually like to make this more concrete. Can any of you propose a scenario for my students to resolve? Feel free to be as mean as possible.
                  >>
                  >> Regards,
                  >>
                  >> Matt Moore
                  >>
                • Jacqueline Saldana
                  Hello Peter, CoPs and teams are not the same thing. The literature is clear about the characteristics of a CoP and how it differentiates from a social club, a
                  Message 8 of 15 , Aug 15, 2012
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                    Hello Peter,

                    CoPs and teams are not the same thing. The literature is clear about the characteristics of a CoP and how it differentiates from a social club, a team, or a work division. Refer to the contemporary texts of Wenger, Potter, et al. a well as the Enclyclopedia of CoPs. The community of practitioners that alerted the dangers of CFCs in the 1970s as well as the community of practitioners that worked the Linux software platform are good case studies on the nature of CoPs. See the modern example of the Anonymous hacker group. I would say it is a CoP.

                    Jackie

                    Jackie Saldaña, MBA, CALLA, DM Learner
                    Academia, Leadership, and Business Solutions
                    "Corrective learning begins with the awakening of spirit, and the turning away from belief in physical sight." ("A Course in Miracles," p. 22). Let me share a holy instant with you.



                    --- On Wed, 8/15/12, peter bond <plbond@...> wrote:

                    From: peter bond <plbond@...>
                    Subject: Re: [cp] Toughest CoP situations - your call
                    To: com-prac@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Wednesday, August 15, 2012, 2:31 PM

                     

                    When they realise they are a CoP AND a team at the same time? What to do, the text books are ambiguous on this.

                    Pete

                    ========================================
                    Message Received: Aug 15 2012, 12:24 PM
                    From: "Miguel Cornejo"
                    To: "com-prac@yahoogroups.com"
                    Cc:
                    Subject: Re: [cp] Toughest CoP situations - your call

                    > :-) just two
                    >
                    > 1. Wide CoP, volunteer based. For external reasons the engines (coordinator & main mods & even main content prducer) become passive in th same year, without perspective of recuperation. The CoP rumbles on some months but is very clearly losing activity and relevance.
                    >
                    > 2. My fave - clash between rules and custom. Sponsored CoP. A group of very active members disagrees with the common setup and agitates against the management team with the ultimate aim of splitting the CoP and taking away most of the membership to a new initiative.

                    Mission: fight entropy :-).

                    Best regards,

                    Miguel
                    >
                    > Enviado desde mi telefono
                    >
                    > El 15/08/2012, a las 12:51, Matt Moore escribió:
                    >
                    >> Hello,
                    >>
                    >> So I'm reviewing/writing a course for KM Masters students that includes a session on CoPs. The key question is "What might go wrong in a community of practice? Give ideas for strategies for supporting successful communities"
                    >>
                    >> While I recognise the first part of the question is a useful activity, I'd actually like to make this more concrete. Can any of you propose a scenario for my students to resolve? Feel free to be as mean as possible.
                    >>
                    >> Regards,
                    >>
                    >> Matt Moore
                    >>

                  • Lee Romero
                    I agree, but the challenge I see often is when you tell a senior person in your organization, Your (group, department, practice, whatever) isn t really a
                    Message 9 of 15 , Aug 15, 2012
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                      I agree, but the challenge I see often is when you tell a senior person in your organization, "Your (group, department, practice, whatever) isn't really a community - it's a means for you to organize people [likely for some combination of P/L or reporting or whatever]", they don't listen.

                      The reaction is often, "Well, I expect them to act like a community and I'm sure if you provision a (tool, site, discussion board, whatever) for them, they'll start acting like one".

                      But, they likely don't.

                      And, some months / years later, you end up de-provisioning.

                      Good intentions but you can't force a community where it doesn't exist.

                      Lee

                      On Wed, Aug 15, 2012 at 11:49 AM, Jacqueline Saldana <jacquelineb.saldana@...> wrote:


                      Hello Peter,

                      CoPs and teams are not the same thing. The literature is clear about the characteristics of a CoP and how it differentiates from a social club, a team, or a work division. Refer to the contemporary texts of Wenger, Potter, et al. a well as the Enclyclopedia of CoPs. The community of practitioners that alerted the dangers of CFCs in the 1970s as well as the community of practitioners that worked the Linux software platform are good case studies on the nature of CoPs. See the modern example of the Anonymous hacker group. I would say it is a CoP.

                      Jackie

                      Jackie Saldaña, MBA, CALLA, DM Learner
                      Academia, Leadership, and Business Solutions
                      "Corrective learning begins with the awakening of spirit, and the turning away from belief in physical sight." ("A Course in Miracles," p. 22). Let me share a holy instant with you.


                    • John Smith
                      Good question, Matt! Given the context of your exercise, I would suggest a challenge that goes to the confusions that your students will eventually face in the
                      Message 10 of 15 , Aug 15, 2012
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                        Good question, Matt!

                        Given the context of your exercise, I would suggest a challenge that goes to the confusions that your students will eventually face in the workplace. There are all kinds of tough (and interesting) challenges faced by communities that have never been touched by a KM student (or grad, or wannabe like me :-) BUT your students will more likely face:

                        * organizational conflicts or confusion
                        * unwarented or impossible expectations
                        * general incomprehension as to why a domain might possibly be relevant or interesting (and yet it's YOUR job to launch it)
                        * etc., etc.

                        One interesting stillbirth that I've observed recently is when a community was populated by people offering and willing to help (that is they thought they had answers) but nobody who was willing to ask any questions. Result: no energy.

                        By the way, would you share the question you finally choose? (Even better: how about sharing a few of the students responses!)

                        Cheers!

                        John
                        * John David Smith ~ Voice: 503.963.8229 ~ Skype & Twitter: smithjd http://gplus.to/smithjd
                        * Portland, Oregon, USA http://www.learningAlliances.net
                        * Join our Ning Stackathon at http://cpsquare.org/wiki/Ning_Stackathon_project
                        * "We are as autonomous with regard to technology as we are with regard to
                        * language, oxygen, or gravity." - Peter-Paul Verbeek

                        --- In com-prac@yahoogroups.com, Matt Moore <innotecture@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Hello,
                        >
                        > So I'm reviewing/writing a course for KM Masters students that includes a session on CoPs. The key question is "What might go wrong in a community of practice? Give ideas for strategies for supporting successful communities"
                        >
                        > While I recognise the first part of the question is a useful activity, I'd actually like to make this more concrete. Can any of you propose a scenario for my students to resolve? Feel free to be as mean as possible.
                        >
                        > Regards,
                        >
                        > Matt Moore
                        >
                      • Jacqueline Saldana
                        Lee, I could not agree more. The if you build it, they will come does not work well for a true CoP. Jackie Jackie Saldaña, MBA, CALLA, DM Learner Academia,
                        Message 11 of 15 , Aug 15, 2012
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                          Lee,

                          I could not agree more. The "if you build it, they will come" does not work well for a true CoP.

                          Jackie

                          Jackie Saldaña, MBA, CALLA, DM Learner
                          Academia, Leadership, and Business Solutions
                          "Corrective learning begins with the awakening of spirit, and the turning away from belief in physical sight." ("A Course in Miracles," p. 22). Let me share a holy instant with you.



                          --- On Wed, 8/15/12, Lee Romero <pekadad@...> wrote:

                          From: Lee Romero <pekadad@...>
                          Subject: Re: [cp] Toughest CoP situations - your call
                          To: com-prac@yahoogroups.com
                          Date: Wednesday, August 15, 2012, 3:58 PM

                           

                          I agree, but the challenge I see often is when you tell a senior person in your organization, "Your (group, department, practice, whatever) isn't really a community - it's a means for you to organize people [likely for some combination of P/L or reporting or whatever]", they don't listen.


                          The reaction is often, "Well, I expect them to act like a community and I'm sure if you provision a (tool, site, discussion board, whatever) for them, they'll start acting like one".

                          But, they likely don't.

                          And, some months / years later, you end up de-provisioning.

                          Good intentions but you can't force a community where it doesn't exist.

                          Lee

                          On Wed, Aug 15, 2012 at 11:49 AM, Jacqueline Saldana <jacquelineb.saldana@...> wrote:


                          Hello Peter,

                          CoPs and teams are not the same thing. The literature is clear about the characteristics of a CoP and how it differentiates from a social club, a team, or a work division. Refer to the contemporary texts of Wenger, Potter, et al. a well as the Enclyclopedia of CoPs. The community of practitioners that alerted the dangers of CFCs in the 1970s as well as the community of practitioners that worked the Linux software platform are good case studies on the nature of CoPs. See the modern example of the Anonymous hacker group. I would say it is a CoP.

                          Jackie

                          Jackie Saldaña, MBA, CALLA, DM Learner
                          Academia, Leadership, and Business Solutions
                          "Corrective learning begins with the awakening of spirit, and the turning away from belief in physical sight." ("A Course in Miracles," p. 22). Let me share a holy instant with you.


                        • Matt Moore
                          John ... Of course! Anything else would be rude. ... I would very much like to. Let me check with the course convenor about how this might be acheived:
                          Message 12 of 15 , Aug 15, 2012
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                            John
                             

                            By the way, would you share the question you finally choose?

                            Of course! Anything else would be rude.

                            (Even better: how about sharing a few of the students responses!)

                            I would very much like to. Let me check with the course convenor about how this might be acheived:

                            Regards,

                            Matt
                          • Bronwyn Stuckey
                            Hi Matt, I think the single greatest and most epic fail in at least Internet-mediated CoPs is that developers get seduced by the technology. I know from very
                            Message 13 of 15 , Aug 15, 2012
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                              Hi Matt,

                              I think the single greatest and most epic fail in at least Internet-mediated CoPs is that developers get seduced by the technology. I know from very personal and painful experience and it was this failure is what propelled me into my last 12 years of work and research :-)

                              So the story goes... that people recognize a community will be of benefit to the initiative. The prospective members are highly distributed, so web technology/social media is going to be important. The team works hard at needs analysis and design for that technology. It is well researched as communication media and designed to a level that looks very successful and a place you would want to be. It is launched to the prospective members and they do flock there, but little by little lack of the stickiness is apparent and it becomes a place inhabited by echoes. So what was the problem? This was a team that had researched thoroughly and the design did meet user needs. BUT they were seduced by the technology and forgot the human and social components of community. There was no allocation of time or workload for facilitation, building capacity, reaching out to members and linking them back in. In my personal research of 12 CoPs, across many different domains and industries, the conveners described the their role as being 50% 1-to-1 NOT the one to many that people assume is the facilitation role. The design was so complete that it was the designers community and not a space that the members felt they could take ownership or reshape. And the list does on... There were many human factors that fell by the wayside as people got caught up in design. Over and over I see technology as this tangible part of online community building totally and stealthily seduce people.

                              The moral is - If you build it they WILL come - but they won't stick around unless you have the human infrastructure and capacity building right.

                              Bron






                              On 16/08/12 3:28 AM, John Smith wrote:
                               

                              Good question, Matt!

                              Given the context of your exercise, I would suggest a challenge that goes to the confusions that your students will eventually face in the workplace. There are all kinds of tough (and interesting) challenges faced by communities that have never been touched by a KM student (or grad, or wannabe like me :-) BUT your students will more likely face:

                              * organizational conflicts or confusion
                              * unwarented or impossible expectations
                              * general incomprehension as to why a domain might possibly be relevant or interesting (and yet it's YOUR job to launch it)
                              * etc., etc.

                              One interesting stillbirth that I've observed recently is when a community was populated by people offering and willing to help (that is they thought they had answers) but nobody who was willing to ask any questions. Result: no energy.

                              By the way, would you share the question you finally choose? (Even better: how about sharing a few of the students responses!)

                              Cheers!

                              John
                              * John David Smith ~ Voice: 503.963.8229 ~ Skype & Twitter: smithjd http://gplus.to/smithjd
                              * Portland, Oregon, USA http://www.learningAlliances.net
                              * Join our Ning Stackathon at http://cpsquare.org/wiki/Ning_Stackathon_project
                              * "We are as autonomous with regard to technology as we are with regard to
                              * language, oxygen, or gravity." - Peter-Paul Verbeek

                              --- In com-prac@yahoogroups.com, Matt Moore <innotecture@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Hello,
                              >
                              > So I'm reviewing/writing a course for KM Masters students that includes a session on CoPs. The key question is "What might go wrong in a community of practice? Give ideas for strategies for supporting successful communities"
                              >
                              > While I recognise the first part of the question is a useful activity, I'd actually like to make this more concrete. Can any of you propose a scenario for my students to resolve? Feel free to be as mean as possible.
                              >
                              > Regards,
                              >
                              > Matt Moore
                              >


                            • Patrick Lambe
                              A self-formed community of technical experts within a large organisation meet informally but regularly to share tricks of the trade. This becomes so popular
                              Message 14 of 15 , Aug 16, 2012
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                                A self-formed community of technical experts within a large organisation meet informally but regularly to share tricks of the trade. This becomes so popular (and useful) that management start encouraging less experienced staff to attend the CoP sessions. The proceedings start getting dumbed down to cater to entry level concerns and issues, and the experts get bored, start drifting away. There's a rumour some of them are meeting in a pub down the road after work.

                                P

                                Patrick Lambe
                                Partner
                                Tel: +65 62210383





                                On Aug 15, 2012, at 7:29 PM, Matt Moore wrote:

                                 

                                Love em! (well, as an observer, not so much as a community manager) keep em coming!


                                From: Miguel Cornejo <macuarium@...>
                                To: "com-prac@yahoogroups.com" <com-prac@yahoogroups.com>
                                Sent: Wednesday, 15 August 2012 9:23 PM
                                Subject: Re: [cp] Toughest CoP situations - your call

                                 


                                :-) just two

                                1. Wide CoP, volunteer based. For external reasons the engines (coordinator & main mods & even main content prducer) become passive in th same year, without perspective of recuperation. The CoP rumbles on some months but is very clearly losing activity and relevance. 

                                2. My fave - clash between rules and custom. Sponsored CoP. A group of very active members disagrees with the common setup and agitates against the management team with the ultimate aim of splitting the CoP and taking away most of the membership to a new initiative. 

                                Mission: fight entropy :-).

                                Best regards,

                                Miguel

                                Enviado desde mi telefono

                                El 15/08/2012, a las 12:51, Matt Moore <innotecture@yahoo .com> escribió:

                                 
                                Hello,

                                So I'm reviewing/writing a course for KM Masters students that includes a session on CoPs. The key question is "What might go wrong in a community of practice? Give ideas for strategies for supporting successful communities"

                                While I recognise the first part of the question is a useful activity, I'd actually like to make this more concrete. Can any of you propose a scenario for my students to resolve? Feel free to be as mean as possible.

                                Regards,

                                Matt Moore




                              • matthewkalman
                                Hi Bron, Just wanted to check with you, when you say the conveners described the their role as being 50% 1-to-1 NOT the one to many that people assume is the
                                Message 15 of 15 , Aug 24, 2012
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                                  Hi Bron,

                                  Just wanted to check with you, when you say "the conveners described the their role as being 50% 1-to-1 NOT the one to many that people assume is the facilitation role" - you mean that in *successful* CoPs, 50% of your time will need to be on 1-to-1, right?

                                  I'm in a new role as an online community manager - and I can just hear the voices saying, 'just put in place some processes', 'Avoid 1-to-1 engagement yourself' etc.

                                  Can I legitimately reply that if I do that, the communities will be more likely to fail? (At least in the case of more focused CoPs).

                                  Have you written up your conclusions from the 12 CoPs you studied anywhere? I'd love to read them all.(Apologies if it's well known that you have!).

                                  Matthew



                                  --- In com-prac@yahoogroups.com, Bronwyn Stuckey <bstuckey@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Hi Matt,
                                  >
                                  > I think the single greatest and most epic fail in at least
                                  > Internet-mediated CoPs is that developers get seduced by the technology.
                                  > I know from very personal and painful experience and it was this failure
                                  > is what propelled me into my last 12 years of work and research :-)
                                  >
                                  > So the story goes... that people recognize a community will be of
                                  > benefit to the initiative. The prospective members are highly
                                  > distributed, so web technology/social media is going to be important.
                                  > The team works hard at needs analysis and design for that technology. It
                                  > is well researched as communication media and designed to a level that
                                  > looks very successful and a place you would want to be. It is launched
                                  > to the prospective members and they do flock there, but little by little
                                  > lack of the stickiness is apparent and it becomes a place inhabited by
                                  > echoes. So what was the problem? This was a team that had researched
                                  > thoroughly and the design did meet user needs. BUT they were seduced by
                                  > the technology and forgot the human and social components of community.
                                  > There was no allocation of time or workload for facilitation, building
                                  > capacity, reaching out to members and linking them back in. In my
                                  > personal research of 12 CoPs, across many different domains and
                                  > industries, the conveners described the their role as being 50% 1-to-1
                                  > NOT the one to many that people assume is the facilitation role. The
                                  > design was so complete that it was the designers community and not a
                                  > space that the members felt they could take ownership or reshape. And
                                  > the list does on... There were many human factors that fell by the
                                  > wayside as people got caught up in design. Over and over I see
                                  > technology as this tangible part of online community building totally
                                  > and stealthily seduce people.
                                  >
                                  > The moral is - If you build it they WILL come - but they won't stick
                                  > around unless you have the human infrastructure and capacity building right.
                                  >
                                  > Bron
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > On 16/08/12 3:28 AM, John Smith wrote:
                                  > >
                                  > > Good question, Matt!
                                  > >
                                  > > Given the context of your exercise, I would suggest a challenge that
                                  > > goes to the confusions that your students will eventually face in the
                                  > > workplace. There are all kinds of tough (and interesting) challenges
                                  > > faced by communities that have never been touched by a KM student (or
                                  > > grad, or wannabe like me :-) BUT your students will more likely face:
                                  > >
                                  > > * organizational conflicts or confusion
                                  > > * unwarented or impossible expectations
                                  > > * general incomprehension as to why a domain might possibly be
                                  > > relevant or interesting (and yet it's YOUR job to launch it)
                                  > > * etc., etc.
                                  > >
                                  > > One interesting stillbirth that I've observed recently is when a
                                  > > community was populated by people offering and willing to help (that
                                  > > is they thought they had answers) but nobody who was willing to ask
                                  > > any questions. Result: no energy.
                                  > >
                                  > > By the way, would you share the question you finally choose? (Even
                                  > > better: how about sharing a few of the students responses!)
                                  > >
                                  > > Cheers!
                                  > >
                                  > > John
                                  > > * John David Smith ~ Voice: 503.963.8229 ~ Skype & Twitter: smithjd
                                  > > http://gplus.to/smithjd
                                  > > * Portland, Oregon, USA http://www.learningAlliances.net
                                  > > * Join our Ning Stackathon at
                                  > > http://cpsquare.org/wiki/Ning_Stackathon_project
                                  > > * "We are as autonomous with regard to technology as we are with
                                  > > regard to
                                  > > * language, oxygen, or gravity." - Peter-Paul Verbeek
                                  > >
                                  > > --- In com-prac@yahoogroups.com <mailto:com-prac%40yahoogroups.com>,
                                  > > Matt Moore <innotecture@> wrote:
                                  > > >
                                  > > > Hello,
                                  > > >
                                  > > > So I'm reviewing/writing a course for KM Masters students that
                                  > > includes a session on CoPs. The key question is "What might go wrong
                                  > > in a community of practice? Give ideas for strategies for supporting
                                  > > successful communities"
                                  > > >
                                  > > > While I recognise the first part of the question is a useful
                                  > > activity, I'd actually like to make this more concrete. Can any of you
                                  > > propose a scenario for my students to resolve? Feel free to be as mean
                                  > > as possible.
                                  > > >
                                  > > > Regards,
                                  > > >
                                  > > > Matt Moore
                                  > > >
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  >
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