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Archetypes (was: Use of Personas to Guide CoP Design)

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  • Matt Moore
    Archetypes are not the same as personas but Partick Lambe & Shawn Callahan identified a series of archetypes associated with the actkm list*:
    Message 1 of 9 , Sep 22 6:08 PM
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      Archetypes are not the same as personas but Partick Lambe & Shawn Callahan identified a series of archetypes associated with the actkm list*: http://www.greenchameleon.com/thoughtpieces/archetypes.pdf

      Now these are more about reflecting the behaviours & culture of an online community rather than its technical functionality.

      *I think that the actkm list may be one of the most analysed email lists in the world. It's the Drosophila melanogaster of online communities.

      --- On Tue, 9/22/09, Jon <jonbrick@...> wrote:

      From: Jon <jonbrick@...>
      Subject: [cp] Re: Use of Personas to Guide CoP Design
      To: com-prac@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Tuesday, September 22, 2009, 5:27 PM






       





      Miguel,



      I'm looking into using several personas as design tools for a CoP. In most cases, the designers develop 3-7 personas; however, for each design feature they focus on a single persona. Since I'm working with an established community (to update the site or add new features in the future), I have access to current users to develop these personas. I was just wondering if anyone has seen articles on personas used in CoPs, or if they actually used them for their CoPs.



      Thanks, Jon



      --- In com-prac@yahoogroup s.com, "Cornejo Castro, Miguel" <miguel.cornejo@ ...> wrote:

      >

      > Hi John,

      >

      > it's an interesting idea but:

      >

      > - I don't think you could simplify the different types of user into a single persona - and not just by level of participation. You get very different drivers, values, and attitudes. Too many types, all legitimate targets.

      > - Designing for someone that you expect to become part of the community is a trap (one I've fallen into a couple of times). The real community tends to have different ideas.

      >

      > Nevertheless it sounds practical for in-vitro CoP design. Please let me know if you find that kind of materials.

      >

      > Best regards,

      >

      > Miguel

      > ____________ _________ _________ _________ _

      > De: com-prac@yahoogroup s.com [com-prac@yahoogroup s.com] En nombre de Jon [jonbrick@.. .]

      > Enviado el: lunes, 21 de septiembre de 2009 16:58

      > Para: com-prac@yahoogroup s.com

      > Asunto: [cp] Use of Personas to Guide CoP Design

      >

      > I'm researching the use of personas (Cooper 1999) to serve as design tools for designing CoPs. I have only found one article in the literature where personas were used to design CoP features; however, the article just considered facilitator features, not end-user or member features.

      >

      > Does anyone know of published research covering persona use in designing CoPs?

      >

      > Thanks, Jon Brickey

      > UC Denver

      >































      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jon
      Nancy, Sorry, I was away from my computer for a while and couldn t reply before the discussion veered away from what I was thinking of. I am thinking of
      Message 2 of 9 , Sep 22 7:32 PM
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        Nancy,

        Sorry, I was away from my computer for a while and couldn't reply before the discussion veered away from what I was thinking of. I am thinking of personas as a design tool for the CoP platform software. This may apply more to CoPs that are involved in the design of their software features as opposed to those who just buy off the shelf. Here's a description of personas from wikipedia:

        "A user persona is a representation of the goals and behavior of a real group of users. In most cases, personas are synthesized from data collected from interviews with users. They are captured in 1–2 page descriptions that include behavior patterns, goals, skills, attitudes, and environment, with a few fictional personal details to make the persona a realistic character. For each product, more than one persona is usually created, but one persona should always be the primary focus for the design.

        The use of personas as a technique was popularized by Alan Cooper in his 1999 book The Inmates are Running the Asylum. The book outlines the general characteristics, uses, and best practices for creating personas."

        Personas have been gaining in popularity among software/usability/interface designers. One famous use of personas is Windows XP--Microsoft created six personas to design XP (in order to keep the user in mind and improve communication within the development team).

        I'm sorry if I confused everyone, but I'm researching this topic in my PhD program and considering it for my dissertation. I would like to study the use of personas in designing online CoP features and explore their ability to represent community members.

        Thanks, Jon


        --- In com-prac@yahoogroups.com, Nancy White <nancyw@...> wrote:
        >
        > I had a little aha moment here. Jon, do you mean persona's for CoP
        > platform software, not for roles in a CoP, right? I think it might be
        > helpful to tease that apart...
        >
        > Nancy
        >
        > At 09:27 AM 9/22/2009, you wrote:
        > >Miguel,
        > >
        > >I'm looking into using several personas as design tools for a
        > >CoP. In most cases, the designers develop 3-7 personas; however,
        > >for each design feature they focus on a single persona. Since I'm
        > >working with an established community (to update the site or add new
        > >features in the future), I have access to current users to develop
        > >these personas. I was just wondering if anyone has seen articles on
        > >personas used in CoPs, or if they actually used them for their CoPs.
        > >
        > >Thanks, Jon
        > >
        > >--- In com-prac@yahoogroups.com, "Cornejo Castro, Miguel"
        > ><miguel.cornejo@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > Hi John,
        > > >
        > > > it's an interesting idea but:
        > > >
        > > > - I don't think you could simplify the different types of user
        > > into a single persona - and not just by level of participation. You
        > > get very different drivers, values, and attitudes. Too many types,
        > > all legitimate targets.
        > > > - Designing for someone that you expect to become part of the
        > > community is a trap (one I've fallen into a couple of times). The
        > > real community tends to have different ideas.
        > > >
        > > > Nevertheless it sounds practical for in-vitro CoP design. Please
        > > let me know if you find that kind of materials.
        > > >
        > > > Best regards,
        > > >
        > > > Miguel
        > > > ________________________________________
        > > > De: com-prac@yahoogroups.com [com-prac@yahoogroups.com] En nombre
        > > de Jon [jonbrick@]
        > > > Enviado el: lunes, 21 de septiembre de 2009 16:58
        > > > Para: com-prac@yahoogroups.com
        > > > Asunto: [cp] Use of Personas to Guide CoP Design
        > > >
        > > > I'm researching the use of personas (Cooper 1999) to serve as
        > > design tools for designing CoPs. I have only found one article in
        > > the literature where personas were used to design CoP features;
        > > however, the article just considered facilitator features, not
        > > end-user or member features.
        > > >
        > > > Does anyone know of published research covering persona use in
        > > designing CoPs?
        > > >
        > > > Thanks, Jon Brickey
        > > > UC Denver
        > > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >------------------------------------
        > >
        > >*-- The email forum on communities of practice --*Yahoo! Groups Links
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        > Nancy White | Full Circle Associates | Connecting communities online
        > nancyw@... | +1 206 517 4754 | GMT - 8 |skype - choconancy |
        > Twitter NancyWhite
        > http://www.fullcirc.com/
        >
      • Jon
        Matt, This example of using archetypes is somewhat close, but the motives are different. Personas are used to keep the system or product developers focused on
        Message 3 of 9 , Sep 22 7:53 PM
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          Matt,

          This example of using archetypes is somewhat close, but the motives are different. Personas are used to keep the system or product developers focused on the users, to communicate within the development team, and to improve the usability of the software. The archetype example seems to be focused more on the personalities within the community in order to understand the overall culture(s), whereas personas are concerned with the user goals, needs, and frustrations.

          Working with an online CoP, I recently interviewed 23 participants and created 3 personas. Some of the characteristics that differentiated them were: how they used the forum (discussions vs documents), how they shared information in the forum, how they found expertise in the forum, frequency of use, IT skills, etc. I am hoping the final personas will be useful for the community facilitators/designers. I would like to expand my research to consider how representative they are--how do the other 5,000 members feel about the personas' ability to represent their goals, needs, and frustrations when it comes to using the CoP.

          I have not been able to find much research combining personas and CoPs, but there are plenty of papers on designing other Web-based tools like: mortgage Web sites, information repositories, help desk software, operating systems, and many others.

          Thanks, Jon

          --- In com-prac@yahoogroups.com, Matt Moore <laalgadger@...> wrote:
          >
          > Archetypes are not the same as personas but Partick Lambe & Shawn Callahan identified a series of archetypes associated with the actkm list*: http://www.greenchameleon.com/thoughtpieces/archetypes.pdf
          >
          > Now these are more about reflecting the behaviours & culture of an online community rather than its technical functionality.
          >
          > *I think that the actkm list may be one of the most analysed email lists in the world. It's the Drosophila melanogaster of online communities.
          >
          > --- On Tue, 9/22/09, Jon <jonbrick@...> wrote:
          >
          > From: Jon <jonbrick@...>
          > Subject: [cp] Re: Use of Personas to Guide CoP Design
          > To: com-prac@yahoogroups.com
          > Date: Tuesday, September 22, 2009, 5:27 PM
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >  
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Miguel,
          >
          >
          >
          > I'm looking into using several personas as design tools for a CoP. In most cases, the designers develop 3-7 personas; however, for each design feature they focus on a single persona. Since I'm working with an established community (to update the site or add new features in the future), I have access to current users to develop these personas. I was just wondering if anyone has seen articles on personas used in CoPs, or if they actually used them for their CoPs.
          >
          >
          >
          > Thanks, Jon
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In com-prac@yahoogroup s.com, "Cornejo Castro, Miguel" <miguel.cornejo@ ...> wrote:
          >
          > >
          >
          > > Hi John,
          >
          > >
          >
          > > it's an interesting idea but:
          >
          > >
          >
          > > - I don't think you could simplify the different types of user into a single persona - and not just by level of participation. You get very different drivers, values, and attitudes. Too many types, all legitimate targets.
          >
          > > - Designing for someone that you expect to become part of the community is a trap (one I've fallen into a couple of times). The real community tends to have different ideas.
          >
          > >
          >
          > > Nevertheless it sounds practical for in-vitro CoP design. Please let me know if you find that kind of materials.
          >
          > >
          >
          > > Best regards,
          >
          > >
          >
          > > Miguel
          >
          > > ____________ _________ _________ _________ _
          >
          > > De: com-prac@yahoogroup s.com [com-prac@yahoogroup s.com] En nombre de Jon [jonbrick@ .]
          >
          > > Enviado el: lunes, 21 de septiembre de 2009 16:58
          >
          > > Para: com-prac@yahoogroup s.com
          >
          > > Asunto: [cp] Use of Personas to Guide CoP Design
          >
          > >
          >
          > > I'm researching the use of personas (Cooper 1999) to serve as design tools for designing CoPs. I have only found one article in the literature where personas were used to design CoP features; however, the article just considered facilitator features, not end-user or member features.
          >
          > >
          >
          > > Does anyone know of published research covering persona use in designing CoPs?
          >
          > >
          >
          > > Thanks, Jon Brickey
          >
          > > UC Denver
          >
          > >
          >
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          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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