Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

RE: [cp] Top 10 elements of a community member 'profile'

Expand Messages
  • Cornejo Castro, Miguel
    Hi Lauren, that depends completely on what s relevant for the group... I actually tend to keep it down to the bare minimum and make it all optional (location,
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 21, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi Lauren,

      that depends completely on what's relevant for the group... I actually
      tend to keep it down to the bare minimum and make it all optional
      (location, interests and picture, actually).

      The reason is precisely to avoid "screening": by putting everyone on the
      same footing, you can get a conversation among equals more easily that
      if everyone's tagged as a something-or-other job or title. It's easier
      for people to speak up if you reduce the intimidation level, and
      conversations can be more meaningful if there are no preconceived ideas
      about the other.

      Also, by not dealing with more personal data than absolutely necessary,
      you can get off most of the privacy legislation that regulates them in
      many countries. "Most", not all :-).

      Of course, specific situations may demand very different solutions. And
      you can also build a more complex profile but not make it publicly
      readable.

      Best regards,

      Miguel



      ________________________________

      De: com-prac@yahoogroups.com [mailto:com-prac@yahoogroups.com] En nombre
      de Lauren Klein
      Enviado el: jueves, 21 de febrero de 2008 4:58
      Para: com-prac@yahoogroups.com
      Asunto: [cp] Top 10 elements of a community member 'profile'



      I'm building out a new community member profile and thought I'd ask for
      your input on the top ten desired elements that other experts have found
      the useful data elements to consider. For example, name, physical
      location, company name, role in your organization, current challenges,
      areas of interest, areas of expertise, etc.

      I'd be curious on your practices and perspectives.

      Thanks
      __________________________________________________________
      Shed those extra pounds with MSN and The Biggest Loser!
      http://biggestloser.msn.com/ <http://biggestloser.msn.com/>

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • pete bond
      Hi Lauren, This is one approach I use. It would work best in a collaborative space like sossoon.net which has a graphical means of matching profiles. For info
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 21, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi Lauren, This is one approach I use. It would work best in a
        collaborative space like sossoon.net which has a graphical means of
        matching profiles. For info on sossoon see my reply to John's
        'technology question'.

        I consider profiling as a tool for developing mutually beneficial
        relationships. It is also to do with identifying people who could be
        part of your system (web of relationships/network) for effecting changes
        within or outside of the group, or for proving problems or creating
        solutions.

        The approach I use is based on an idea I came across in a book about
        technology management by a guy called Lowell Steele (1990?). This was
        originally about how to develop successful commercial trading
        relationships by establishing credibility in the eyes and heart of the
        buyer. A relationship is formed when what the buyer values corresponds
        to what the seller is conceived to be able to offer.

        The same approach applies whether one is selling ideas, or products and
        services. Essentially it is about selling solutions, which is very
        pertinent to CoPs. To put it another way, what we refer to as selling is
        about encouraging, convincing, persuading, creating a desire or
        incentive, or in other ways
        influencing, a prospective 'buyer' to invest their time, their energy,
        their resources into taking
        your solution and implementing it in the expectation that the benefits
        will outweigh their costs.
        Success depends on creating, in the mind and hearts of prospective
        buyers, two kinds
        of credibility. These are: Technical Credibility and Safety Credibility.

        My profiling questions are designed to give members the opportunity of
        locating others with similar values and the right kind of technical
        knowledge/experience, which gives the best chance of gaining the two
        kinds of credibility. The first dimension uses describing words based on
        the DISC personality profiling method.

        Dimension 1 (concerns Safety Cred). What personal characteristics do you
        value in
        others? (or Choose the words which best describe yourself.)

        Select (a certain number) from the list below.

        competitiveness
        drive
        audacity
        directness
        pioneering spirit
        strategic awareness................and so on.

        Dimension 2 (also safety cred). Which social cares and interests do you
        value?

        Select (a certain number) from the list below.

        sports
        family
        church/religion
        community engagement
        neighbourhood development
        volunteering and charitable work
        travel
        philosophy.............................and so on.

        Dimension 3 (Technical Credibility) (This list should be adapted
        according to the technical nature of the problems CoP exist to resolve).

        What knowledge, skill, competence, experience (professional, industrial,
        technical, artistic) are you looking for? Or , what knowledge skills,
        etc do you have to offer?

        Select ( a specific number) from the following list (for general
        business networking).

        directing and leading
        managing-big company
        managing-small company
        accountancy
        company and related law
        financial investment
        banking
        business partnering and alliance building...........

        Peter
      • Jim Bert
        You are absolutely focused in the right area as you build out your community profile. The answer to your question though can depend a lot on the type of
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 21, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          You are absolutely focused in the right area as you build out your community profile. The answer to your question though can depend a lot on the type of community you will be running. The profile questions should be focused around the interests of your members; for a few reasons including being able to connect with others with similar social and/or business interests.

          ---------------------------------
          Looking for last minute shopping deals? Find them fast with Yahoo! Search.

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Hildy Gottlieb
          ... ****************************** Lauren: I am assuming this work is for a particular group. If not, please ignore what I am about to say. ... My general
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 21, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            Lauren Klein wrote:
            >
            > I'm building out a new community member profile and thought I'd ask
            > for your input on the top ten desired elements that other experts have
            > found the useful data elements to consider. For example, name,
            > physical location, company name, role in your organization, current
            > challenges, areas of interest, areas of expertise, etc.
            >





            ******************************

            Lauren:
            I am assuming this work is for a particular group. If not, please
            ignore what I am about to say.
            :-)

            My general approach is to ask the group what THEY think is important.
            Then if you have other suggestions (such as those you listed above, or
            those suggested by other Com-Prac'er's here), you can run those ideas by
            the group, to see if that is what is important to them.

            I always figure that tools such as these are more effective when created
            not "for" the group but "with" the group. In that way, the group owns
            the product, and is far more likely to use it and maintain it. (I also
            find these sorts of exercises build bonds within the group, which is
            frequently an important reinforcement, depending on what stage of
            development the group is at.)

            I hope that's helpful.

            Hildy

            Hildy Gottlieb
            *The Community-Driven Institute **at Help 4 NonProfits
            *Changing the World / Creating the Future
            _http://www.Help4NonProfits.com <http://www.help4nonprofits.com/>
            _/*BLOG:*/ http://www.HildyGottlieb.com/
            Hildy@...
            520-321-4433
            or 1-888-787-4433







            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Stan Garfield
            TO: Lauren Klein For the internal KM community at HP, we asked people to supply the following in their profiles: * Name * Location * Time in KM * Time with the
            Message 5 of 6 , Feb 22, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              TO: Lauren Klein

              For the internal KM community at HP, we asked people to supply the
              following in their profiles:

              * Name
              * Location
              * Time in KM
              * Time with the company
              * Organization
              * Personal background and interests
              * Area of expertise
              * Current responsibility
              * What do you consider your greatest success?
              * Name one thing that you would like to achieve?

              For the external KM community I lead, I ask for the following:

              "When requesting membership, please provide your name, location,
              organization, role, and links to your organization's web site and your
              personal blog (if any)."

              Regards,
              Stan



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.