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Re: request for advice: prioritizing knowledge sharing tools for a new CoP

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  • fnickols
    Lynn: From the sound of it, there is neither a community nor a practice. That should prove an interesting challenge. Were I in your shoes, I guess my two
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 28 3:26 PM
      Lynn:

      From the sound of it, there is neither a community nor a practice.
      That should prove an interesting challenge. Were I in your shoes, I
      guess my two starting questions would be these:

      (1) what do these people (those being volunteered) have in common. In
      other words, what foundation for a community might be built upon.

      (2) where and how does the regular, job-related work of these people
      intersect/interact (if it does). If it doesn't, there is no practice
      (other than the work of the task force of which they are all members).

      So, it sounds to me like you've got a CEO who wants a CoP and thinks
      the place to start is with a Task Force. That's not new and it'll
      likely happen again but I'm darned if I know of any instances where a
      task force was successfully transformed into a CoP.

      Perhaps others on the list do.

      In any event, good luck.

      Regards,

      Fred Nickols
      nickols@...

      --- In com-prac@yahoogroups.com, "Lynn Tveskov" <lynn.tveskov@...> wrote:
      >
      > I will be co-leading an effort to build a semi-willing CoP at work. I
      > say semi-willing because CEOs are essentially volunteering staff to
      > participate in a high-profile project team that we will massage,
      > hopefully, into a CoP. I am not assuming a uniform comfort level with
      > things like wikis, blogging, Google docs, Yahoo groups, and other
      > online tools for sharing and building up a body of knowledge.
      >
      > My question: given some concerns about motivation ("Why should I jump
      > through hoops to do all this stuff when I didn't even want to be
      > here...") and probably not a high degree of familiarity of experience
      > or comfort with online tools, what is your advice for the most
      > effective, free and easy-for-beginners suite of online sharing tools?
      >
      > Thanks!
      >
      > Lynn
      >
    • A Christopher
      Lynn, you ve received lots of responses, they all provide useful insights for what you are facing. I am writing to suggest that your highest priority, first
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 2, 2007
        Lynn, you've received lots of responses, they all provide useful
        insights for what you are facing. I am writing to suggest that your
        highest priority, first work was pointed out by Holly's question
        about finding the value and Fred's questions 1 and 2. Your first
        work not tools, it is to move / herd the group to be talking about
        and working on common needs or pains. You have to do this in physical
        space i.e., face to face meetings. There must be engagement among the
        people on a topic, a need or a problem / pain that that they are
        interested in and has value to the company ... without that you don't
        need tools; there is nothing to use them for.

        I can't tell from your situation description whether your CEO is
        seeking a CoP / knowledge focused initiative or a projects /
        collaboration focused initiative. You could check this out

        http://www.projectconnections.com/papers/index.html#networked-tools-
        for-teams

        The Tools for Teams paper listed there goes through how to plan /
        form a team to create a collaboration initiative in an organization.
        For where you are at, look at Step 1 'identify and rank problems'.
        If the needs your CEO wants to address are collaborative that paper
        could be helpful, if the needs are more about application of
        knowledge in a particular domain, then step 1 would have different
        column headers but similar approach.

        Good luck.

        Tony Christopher
        tony@...



        --- In com-prac@yahoogroups.com, "Lynn Tveskov" <lynn.tveskov@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > I will be co-leading an effort to build a semi-willing CoP at
        work. I
        > say semi-willing because CEOs are essentially volunteering staff to
        > participate in a high-profile project team that we will massage,
        > hopefully, into a CoP. I am not assuming a uniform comfort level
        with
        > things like wikis, blogging, Google docs, Yahoo groups, and other
        > online tools for sharing and building up a body of knowledge.
        >
        > My question: given some concerns about motivation ("Why should I
        jump
        > through hoops to do all this stuff when I didn't even want to be
        > here...") and probably not a high degree of familiarity of
        experience
        > or comfort with online tools, what is your advice for the most
        > effective, free and easy-for-beginners suite of online sharing
        tools?
        >
        > Thanks!
        >
        > Lynn
        >
      • Pete Bond
        That a nice resource you have there, Tony. Thanks for the link. You raise an issue that has been discussed here many times before, the difference between CoPs
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 3, 2007
          That a nice resource you have there, Tony. Thanks for the link. You raise an
          issue that has been discussed here many times before, the difference between
          CoPs and teams. I'm all in favour of using the old team development methods
          and there's no better starting place than the old
          storming-norming-performing process to give an indication of how far one is
          from an effective 'team' (or is a CoP?).

          pete
          --
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