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Interested in the Communities and Technologies conference?

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  • John D. Smith
    I ve done a poll within CPsquare to see how many people were interested in attending / participating in the Communities & Technologies conference June 28-30,
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 1, 2006
      I've done a poll within CPsquare to see how many people were interested in
      attending / participating in the Communities & Technologies conference June
      28-30, 2007:

      http://ebusiness.tc.msu.edu/cct2007/

      The reaction seems very mixed. People are very interested in meeting
      face-to-face, but this particular conference seems to turn some people off.

      It seems ironic that we don't have a clear favorite for people working in
      this area. Obviously technology is only one of many factors that shape what
      we're doing. I think we DO need an academic side to the conversation, not
      so much for legitimacy as for systematic, careful study of good practice.
      But in the case of many of the C&T papers I've read from previous years,
      they don't quite attain the level of "good practice" (in my opinion) and are
      not so systematic and too often have execrable English.

      John
      *
      * John D. Smith ~ Voice: 503.963.8229 ~ Skype: smithjd ~
      http://www.learningAlliances.net
      * New address: 5908 SE 47th Ave, Portland, OR 97206-6237
      * "With company we quicken our ascent" -- Rumi

      --
      No virus found in this outgoing message.
      Checked by AVG Free Edition.
      Version: 7.1.409 / Virus Database: 268.15.2/560 - Release Date: 11/30/2006
    • learnasync
      John, I had looked at the call for papers for the Communities & Technologies conference and was interested until I saw the date. The last week of June and
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 2, 2006
        John,

        I had looked at the call for papers for the Communities & Technologies
        conference and was interested until I saw the date. The last week of
        June and first week of July are not good times for a conference.

        Last year Nancy White and I attended the Collaborative Technologies
        Conference in mid-June. In its second year, the event drew a thousand
        people to Boston - where it will be held again this year. Lots of
        great sessions there with a strong emphasis on the web2.0 technologies
        and enterprise issues. There was a limited understanding of the
        dynamics of CoPs and the potential of learning through the use of the
        online collaboration tools on the part of the presenters and the
        participants. And a lack of scholarly conversation.

        For a number of years, Elliott Masie has positioned his Learning 200x
        conference just prior to the Sloan-c conference - both in Orlando.
        They draw from somewhat overlapping audiences with interest in
        learning and technology, the former on the business side and the
        latter on the academic side. I am wondering if a similar strategy to
        bring the Communities & Technologies conference to Boston and
        adjoining the CTC conference would build the interest and capacity
        that both deserve.

        All the best,

        Loretta
        --
        Loretta L. Donovan
        President
        worksmarts
        Strategic collaboration for business results

        Co-owner, AI Consulting
        www.aiconsulting.org

        141-A Main Street
        Tuckahoe NY 10707
        loretta.donovan@...
        tel: 914-779-3246
        mobile: 914-309-3952

        The great end of life is not knowledge but action.
        ~~ Thomas Henry Huxley (1825-1895)

        --- In com-prac@yahoogroups.com, "John D. Smith" <john.smith@...> wrote:
        >
        > I've done a poll within CPsquare to see how many people were
        interested in
        > attending / participating in the Communities & Technologies
        conference June
        > 28-30, 2007:
        >
        > http://ebusiness.tc.msu.edu/cct2007/
        >
        > The reaction seems very mixed. People are very interested in meeting
        > face-to-face, but this particular conference seems to turn some
        people off.
        >
        > It seems ironic that we don't have a clear favorite for people
        working in
        > this area. Obviously technology is only one of many factors that
        shape what
        > we're doing. I think we DO need an academic side to the
        conversation, not
        > so much for legitimacy as for systematic, careful study of good
        practice.
        > But in the case of many of the C&T papers I've read from previous years,
        > they don't quite attain the level of "good practice" (in my opinion)
        and are
        > not so systematic and too often have execrable English.
        >
        > John
        > *
        > * John D. Smith ~ Voice: 503.963.8229 ~ Skype: smithjd ~
        > http://www.learningAlliances.net
        > * New address: 5908 SE 47th Ave, Portland, OR 97206-6237
        > * "With company we quicken our ascent" -- Rumi
        >
      • Bronwyn Stuckey
        I like many others do think academic conferences can be somewhat inward looking and that research is written in inextricable and inaccessible ways, often only
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 5, 2006
          I like many others do think academic conferences can be somewhat inward
          looking and that research is written in inextricable and inaccessible
          ways, often only for other researchers to read. Some times people are so
          removed from the practice they are researching one has to wonder how
          they got funding. That being said I have found that grafting onto an
          academic conference has been great for me. I get to pick the eyes out of
          the academic conference, locate the gems and don't feel at all guilty if
          I bunk off from the formal conference to share with new colleagues and
          practitioners, visit people in CoPs in that city, or just visit a great
          Art museum with a CPsquare buddy. In a way my experience of the grafting
          of other activities onto a formal conference has totally changed to
          value I take and now seek from those formal conferences. I do think our
          infiltration of such conferences might actually change things beyond
          individuals though - (something about the mountain an Mohammad). I am
          hoping to attend the Communities & Technologies conference in June and
          hope others will join this covert activity ;-)

          Bron



          John D. Smith wrote:
          >
          > I've done a poll within CPsquare to see how many people were interested in
          > attending / participating in the Communities & Technologies conference
          > June
          > 28-30, 2007:
          >
          > http://ebusiness.tc.msu.edu/cct2007/
          > <http://ebusiness.tc.msu.edu/cct2007/>
          >
          > The reaction seems very mixed. People are very interested in meeting
          > face-to-face, but this particular conference seems to turn some people
          > off.
          >
          > It seems ironic that we don't have a clear favorite for people working in
          > this area. Obviously technology is only one of many factors that shape
          > what
          > we're doing. I think we DO need an academic side to the conversation, not
          > so much for legitimacy as for systematic, careful study of good practice.
          > But in the case of many of the C&T papers I've read from previous years,
          > they don't quite attain the level of "good practice" (in my opinion)
          > and are
          > not so systematic and too often have execrable English.
          >
          > John
          > *
          > * John D. Smith ~ Voice: 503.963.8229 ~ Skype: smithjd ~
          > http://www.learningAlliances.net <http://www.learningAlliances.net>
          > * New address: 5908 SE 47th Ave, Portland, OR 97206-6237
          > * "With company we quicken our ascent" -- Rumi
          >
          > --
          > No virus found in this outgoing message.
          > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
          > Version: 7.1.409 / Virus Database: 268.15.2/560 - Release Date: 11/30/2006
          >
          >
          >
        • John D. Smith
          Bronwyn, I agree with you. Building on what you said, I think it s probably pretty phony of people like me who advocate self-organization and self-directed
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 5, 2006
            Bronwyn,

            I agree with you. Building on what you said, I think it's probably pretty
            phony of people like me who advocate self-organization and self-directed
            learning to expect a conference to be all good all the time. If we have
            strong opinions about joining practice and theory around communities of
            practice I'd say it's up to US to do some of the joining!

            I got a back channel pat on the head and a heckle for my comment about
            execrable English. That, combined with my lunchtime reading of a paper
            about ICT Kiosk Operators in rural India (which had many a lapse in the
            quality of writing) makes me think that, again, it's a cost / benefit kind
            of a thing. If they have something really interesting and useful (to me)
            that they're trying to say then I'll do the extra work to figure out what
            they're saying.

            Another way of looking at a conference: the conference organizers are
            producing an audience for the presenters. Without that audience of
            supposedly literate people, presenting isn't worth much. And academics have
            to accumulate presentation chits to survive. We vote with our attention.

            John
            *
            * John D. Smith ~ Voice: 503.963.8229 ~ Skype: smithjd ~
            http://www.learningAlliances.net
            * New address: 5908 SE 47th Ave, Portland, OR 97206-6237
            * "With company we quicken our ascent" -- Rumi

            --
            No virus found in this outgoing message.
            Checked by AVG Free Edition.
            Version: 7.1.409 / Virus Database: 268.15.9/573 - Release Date: 12/5/2006
          • Ed Mitchell
            All agreed - conferences can be rather dull - but there are always gems in there - be it one presentation, one conversation, one proper contact (not the horde
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 6, 2006
              All agreed - conferences can be rather dull - but there are always
              gems in there - be it one presentation, one conversation, one proper
              contact (not the horde of business cards - gave them up a while ago),
              one bus ride with a stranger from the airport to the centre etc.
              Lawrence my mentor even says you can judge the quality of a conference
              by the food they give you! And thus we are all well cynical. I was
              just at Online Information in London and came away having met two
              people I have always wanted to meet - and for me - being not really a
              group person - that is a lot...

              I was taught by my friend and ex-work-colleague Patricia (who does
              these a lot more than I will ever do) that it's really about the
              networking though, and conversations, isn't it? - Skip the dull
              presentations (corporate or academic) and get busy knowing people with
              similar interests.

              Earlier this year, while editing http://www.knowledgeboard.com I
              co-did a 'constructivist' conference called Contactivity. We built the
              whole thing around networking - pre-networking via profile swapping
              over a wiki directly segued with structured onsite networking being
              the most important bit of it. We did a day 1 knowledge sink with
              'content' but day 2 didn't have a theme or agenda - the attendees were
              meant to sort that out together in advance (CoP style) and we produced
              three different facilitators to try out three different approaches to
              the consensually-reached theme. We had a KM art gallery (on the
              floor), a lovely pub session on the night of day 1 (for 15 GBP per
              head) and one of the breakout workshop groups elected to do their
              session while walking up to the Greenwich Observatory.

              We're writing a chapter about it for the next knowledgeboard book at
              the moment and encouraging everyone to consider conferences from a
              slightly different angle - less hiding your conversations in the
              corridors because the sponsors expect the organisers to see X hundred
              potential punters, more cheap cheerful risky conversation based stuff
              - kind of like the 'unconference' but more 'constructivist' conference
              - in an organisational context...

              So it's not all bad and window-less .ppt presentations, beta-grade
              research or corporate sponsors hogging boring panels about stuff you
              heard a year ago :-)



              On 12/6/06, John D. Smith <john.smith@...> wrote:
              > Bronwyn,
              >
              > I agree with you. Building on what you said, I think it's probably pretty
              > phony of people like me who advocate self-organization and self-directed
              > learning to expect a conference to be all good all the time. If we have
              > strong opinions about joining practice and theory around communities of
              > practice I'd say it's up to US to do some of the joining!
              >
              > I got a back channel pat on the head and a heckle for my comment about
              > execrable English. That, combined with my lunchtime reading of a paper
              > about ICT Kiosk Operators in rural India (which had many a lapse in the
              > quality of writing) makes me think that, again, it's a cost / benefit kind
              > of a thing. If they have something really interesting and useful (to me)
              > that they're trying to say then I'll do the extra work to figure out what
              > they're saying.
              >
              > Another way of looking at a conference: the conference organizers are
              > producing an audience for the presenters. Without that audience of
              > supposedly literate people, presenting isn't worth much. And academics have
              > to accumulate presentation chits to survive. We vote with our attention.
              >
              > John
              > *
              > * John D. Smith ~ Voice: 503.963.8229 ~ Skype: smithjd ~
              > http://www.learningAlliances.net
              > * New address: 5908 SE 47th Ave, Portland, OR 97206-6237
              > * "With company we quicken our ascent" -- Rumi
              >
              > --
              > No virus found in this outgoing message.
              > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
              > Version: 7.1.409 / Virus Database: 268.15.9/573 - Release Date: 12/5/2006
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > *-- The email forum on communities of practice --*
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • Matthew Moore
              Ed, Contactivity sounds like great fun. This all links to calls for the Unconferencing movement:
              Message 6 of 7 , Dec 6, 2006
                Ed,

                Contactivity sounds like great fun.

                This all links to calls for the Unconferencing movement: http://www.anecdote.com.au/archives/2005/11/unconferencing.html

                There was a big "discussion" about conferences on ACT-KM which resulted in this post: http://www.greenchameleon.com/gc/blog_detail/of_conferences_chatauquas_and_boundary_objects/

                Cheers,

                Matt

                -----Original Message-----
                From: com-prac@yahoogroups.com [mailto:com-prac@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Ed Mitchell
                Sent: Wednesday, 6 December 2006 8:41 PM
                To: com-prac@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [cp] Interested in the Communities and Technologies conference?


                All agreed - conferences can be rather dull - but there are always
                gems in there - be it one presentation, one conversation, one proper
                contact (not the horde of business cards - gave them up a while ago),
                one bus ride with a stranger from the airport to the centre etc.
                Lawrence my mentor even says you can judge the quality of a conference
                by the food they give you! And thus we are all well cynical. I was
                just at Online Information in London and came away having met two
                people I have always wanted to meet - and for me - being not really a
                group person - that is a lot...

                I was taught by my friend and ex-work-colleague Patricia (who does
                these a lot more than I will ever do) that it's really about the
                networking though, and conversations, isn't it? - Skip the dull
                presentations (corporate or academic) and get busy knowing people with
                similar interests.

                Earlier this year, while editing http://www.knowledgeboard.com I
                co-did a 'constructivist' conference called Contactivity. We built the
                whole thing around networking - pre-networking via profile swapping
                over a wiki directly segued with structured onsite networking being
                the most important bit of it. We did a day 1 knowledge sink with
                'content' but day 2 didn't have a theme or agenda - the attendees were
                meant to sort that out together in advance (CoP style) and we produced
                three different facilitators to try out three different approaches to
                the consensually-reached theme. We had a KM art gallery (on the
                floor), a lovely pub session on the night of day 1 (for 15 GBP per
                head) and one of the breakout workshop groups elected to do their
                session while walking up to the Greenwich Observatory.

                We're writing a chapter about it for the next knowledgeboard book at
                the moment and encouraging everyone to consider conferences from a
                slightly different angle - less hiding your conversations in the
                corridors because the sponsors expect the organisers to see X hundred
                potential punters, more cheap cheerful risky conversation based stuff
                - kind of like the 'unconference' but more 'constructivist' conference
                - in an organisational context...

                So it's not all bad and window-less .ppt presentations, beta-grade
                research or corporate sponsors hogging boring panels about stuff you
                heard a year ago :-)

                On 12/6/06, John D. Smith <john.smith@...> wrote:
                > Bronwyn,
                >
                > I agree with you. Building on what you said, I think it's probably pretty
                > phony of people like me who advocate self-organization and self-directed
                > learning to expect a conference to be all good all the time. If we have
                > strong opinions about joining practice and theory around communities of
                > practice I'd say it's up to US to do some of the joining!
                >
                > I got a back channel pat on the head and a heckle for my comment about
                > execrable English. That, combined with my lunchtime reading of a paper
                > about ICT Kiosk Operators in rural India (which had many a lapse in the
                > quality of writing) makes me think that, again, it's a cost / benefit kind
                > of a thing. If they have something really interesting and useful (to me)
                > that they're trying to say then I'll do the extra work to figure out what
                > they're saying.
                >
                > Another way of looking at a conference: the conference organizers are
                > producing an audience for the presenters. Without that audience of
                > supposedly literate people, presenting isn't worth much. And academics have
                > to accumulate presentation chits to survive. We vote with our attention.
                >
                > John
                > *
                > * John D. Smith ~ Voice: 503.963.8229 ~ Skype: smithjd ~
                > http://www.learningAlliances.net
                > * New address: 5908 SE 47th Ave, Portland, OR 97206-6237
                > * "With company we quicken our ascent" -- Rumi
                >
                > --
                > No virus found in this outgoing message.
                > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                > Version: 7.1.409 / Virus Database: 268.15.9/573 - Release Date: 12/5/2006
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > *-- The email forum on communities of practice --*
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                >





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Ed Mitchell
                Hi Mattt - good and thought provoking link - thank you very much. Unconferencing - yes - we thought about it a bit but weren t so keen on the rather anti
                Message 7 of 7 , Dec 7, 2006
                  Hi Mattt -

                  good and thought provoking link - thank you very much.

                  Unconferencing - yes - we thought about it a bit but weren't so keen
                  on the rather 'anti' feel of the 'un' part of the name and were
                  working more along a 'constructivist' line.

                  Other ex-KnowledgeBoarders are running a fun gig in January in
                  Switzerland called unbla:
                  http://www.unbla.org/index.php/about/

                  best,
                  Ed

                  On 12/6/06, Matthew Moore <matthew.moore@...> wrote:
                  > Ed,
                  >
                  > Contactivity sounds like great fun.
                  >
                  > This all links to calls for the Unconferencing movement: http://www.anecdote.com.au/archives/2005/11/unconferencing.html
                  >
                  > There was a big "discussion" about conferences on ACT-KM which resulted in this post: http://www.greenchameleon.com/gc/blog_detail/of_conferences_chatauquas_and_boundary_objects/
                  >
                  > Cheers,
                  >
                  > Matt
                  >
                  > -----Original Message-----
                  > From: com-prac@yahoogroups.com [mailto:com-prac@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Ed Mitchell
                  > Sent: Wednesday, 6 December 2006 8:41 PM
                  > To: com-prac@yahoogroups.com
                  > Subject: Re: [cp] Interested in the Communities and Technologies conference?
                  >
                  >
                  > All agreed - conferences can be rather dull - but there are always
                  > gems in there - be it one presentation, one conversation, one proper
                  > contact (not the horde of business cards - gave them up a while ago),
                  > one bus ride with a stranger from the airport to the centre etc.
                  > Lawrence my mentor even says you can judge the quality of a conference
                  > by the food they give you! And thus we are all well cynical. I was
                  > just at Online Information in London and came away having met two
                  > people I have always wanted to meet - and for me - being not really a
                  > group person - that is a lot...
                  >
                  > I was taught by my friend and ex-work-colleague Patricia (who does
                  > these a lot more than I will ever do) that it's really about the
                  > networking though, and conversations, isn't it? - Skip the dull
                  > presentations (corporate or academic) and get busy knowing people with
                  > similar interests.
                  >
                  > Earlier this year, while editing http://www.knowledgeboard.com I
                  > co-did a 'constructivist' conference called Contactivity. We built the
                  > whole thing around networking - pre-networking via profile swapping
                  > over a wiki directly segued with structured onsite networking being
                  > the most important bit of it. We did a day 1 knowledge sink with
                  > 'content' but day 2 didn't have a theme or agenda - the attendees were
                  > meant to sort that out together in advance (CoP style) and we produced
                  > three different facilitators to try out three different approaches to
                  > the consensually-reached theme. We had a KM art gallery (on the
                  > floor), a lovely pub session on the night of day 1 (for 15 GBP per
                  > head) and one of the breakout workshop groups elected to do their
                  > session while walking up to the Greenwich Observatory.
                  >
                  > We're writing a chapter about it for the next knowledgeboard book at
                  > the moment and encouraging everyone to consider conferences from a
                  > slightly different angle - less hiding your conversations in the
                  > corridors because the sponsors expect the organisers to see X hundred
                  > potential punters, more cheap cheerful risky conversation based stuff
                  > - kind of like the 'unconference' but more 'constructivist' conference
                  > - in an organisational context...
                  >
                  > So it's not all bad and window-less .ppt presentations, beta-grade
                  > research or corporate sponsors hogging boring panels about stuff you
                  > heard a year ago :-)
                  >
                  > On 12/6/06, John D. Smith <john.smith@...> wrote:
                  > > Bronwyn,
                  > >
                  > > I agree with you. Building on what you said, I think it's probably pretty
                  > > phony of people like me who advocate self-organization and self-directed
                  > > learning to expect a conference to be all good all the time. If we have
                  > > strong opinions about joining practice and theory around communities of
                  > > practice I'd say it's up to US to do some of the joining!
                  > >
                  > > I got a back channel pat on the head and a heckle for my comment about
                  > > execrable English. That, combined with my lunchtime reading of a paper
                  > > about ICT Kiosk Operators in rural India (which had many a lapse in the
                  > > quality of writing) makes me think that, again, it's a cost / benefit kind
                  > > of a thing. If they have something really interesting and useful (to me)
                  > > that they're trying to say then I'll do the extra work to figure out what
                  > > they're saying.
                  > >
                  > > Another way of looking at a conference: the conference organizers are
                  > > producing an audience for the presenters. Without that audience of
                  > > supposedly literate people, presenting isn't worth much. And academics have
                  > > to accumulate presentation chits to survive. We vote with our attention.
                  > >
                  > > John
                  > > *
                  > > * John D. Smith ~ Voice: 503.963.8229 ~ Skype: smithjd ~
                  > > http://www.learningAlliances.net
                  > > * New address: 5908 SE 47th Ave, Portland, OR 97206-6237
                  > > * "With company we quicken our ascent" -- Rumi
                  > >
                  > > --
                  > > No virus found in this outgoing message.
                  > > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                  > > Version: 7.1.409 / Virus Database: 268.15.9/573 - Release Date: 12/5/2006
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > *-- The email forum on communities of practice --*
                  > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > *-- The email forum on communities of practice --*
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
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