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Re: [cp] question

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  • Dave Snowden
    A better way to think of it is to abandon the word tacit I work off the saying We always know more than we can tell, we will always tell more than we can
    Message 1 of 8 , Oct 24, 2006
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      A better way to think of it is to abandon the word "tacit"
      I work off the saying "We always know more than we can tell, we will
      always tell more than we can write down"
      That means we have three perspectives on knowledge: experience
      (normal use of tacit), narrative and content.

      Narrative works by capturing large amounts of anecdotes ideally in
      the field without facilitation which are tagged and indexed by their
      creators. Subsequent search mechanisms are based on serendipitous
      encounter with multiple anecdotes. In effect we synthesise multiple
      experiences with current context to create relevant knowledge.

      Properly considered narrative databases work with content and act as
      a transition between content and experience.

      There is plenty of material in article on the web site below if you
      want to look

      I am more dubious about STORY-TELLING as this is practice tends to
      normative recipes etc and has less value.
      ____________________
      Dave Snowden
      Founder & Chief Scientific Officer
      Cognitive Edge Pte Ltd


      snowded@...
      Now blogging at www.cognitive-edge.com
      Skype: snowded

      UK mobile+44 7795 437 293

      Rowan Cottage
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      On 24 Oct 2006, at 07:34, Jacques Perrin wrote:

      > Hi everyone,
      >
      > I have heard that storytelling is probably the best
      > way to share tacit knowledge.
      >
      > Can anyone explain why and how this works?
      >
      > Sincerely,
      >
      > Jacques
      >
      > __________________________________________________
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      >



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Andrew Rixon
      Hi Jacques, Just quickly, I can think of 3 reasons this may be. 1. Story is engaging 2. Story is shared in a language which the listener generally can relate
      Message 2 of 8 , Oct 24, 2006
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        Hi Jacques,



        Just quickly, I can think of 3 reasons this may be.



        1. Story is engaging

        2. Story is shared in a language which the listener generally can relate to,
        with all the glorious details

        3. Story is a form where the storyteller, without knowing it, can share a
        lot more than what they think is knowledge



        Warm regards,

        Andrew



        --

        Check out our great story workshop:

        Change your Story <http://www.anecdote.com.au/coursedisplay.php?cid=13>
        Change your World -- Nov 21, 24, 27 Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne


        Andrew Rixon PhD
        Director
        Anecdote Pty Ltd
        Skype: AndrewJRixon
        Mobile: 0400 352 809
        Fax: (03) 9383 6274
        Email: andrew@...
        URL: http://www.anecdote.com.au

        _____

        From: Jacques Perrin [mailto:perrin_jacques@...]
        Sent: Tuesday, 24 October 2006 4:35 PM
        To: com-prac@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [cp] question



        Hi everyone,

        I have heard that storytelling is probably the best
        way to share tacit knowledge.

        Can anyone explain why and how this works?

        Sincerely,

        Jacques

        __________________________________________________
        Do You Yahoo!?
        Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
        http://mail. <http://mail.yahoo.com> yahoo.com





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Matthew Moore
        Core team members of a community benefit from facilitation skills. In most organisations it is unrealistic to expect them to be professional facilitators. So
        Message 3 of 8 , Oct 24, 2006
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          Core team members of a community benefit from facilitation skills. In most organisations it is unrealistic to expect them to be professional facilitators.
          So you might build up their skills in this area through training, mentoring, reflective learning, etc.

          However, their passion and the professional respect of their peers are both more important than facilitation skills per se. N.B. I only have anecdote to support this so if you have had different experiences, I'd like to hear about them.


          -----Original Message-----
          From: com-prac@yahoogroups.com [mailto:com-prac@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Cornejo Castro, Miguel
          Sent: Tuesday, 24 October 2006 6:12 PM
          To: com-prac@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: RE: [cp] Literature on Facilitation


          Hello Rachel,

          for what good it may be :-), my experience is that starting a CoP is usually much easier with help from a professional (or at least an expert) but that a CoP is not really under way until most facilitators are members (volunteers).

          A professional facilitator is not (usually) really a "part" of the community as a group. It's a great support resource, especially at the design and startup phases, but it's not enough. Communities that stay on "life support" for too long, unable to generate people with the interest, drive and character to take up the facilitation role, will hardly produce the rest of CoP success signs (collaborative projects, active doubt resolution, content and references (knowledge objects)). There comes a time when it's either fly or flop.

          Best regards,

          Miguel

          -----Mensaje original-----
          De: com-prac@yahoogroups.com en nombre de Rachel Weite
          Enviado el: Lun 23/10/2006 21:11
          Para: com-prac@yahoogroups.com
          Asunto: [cp] Literature on Facilitation

          Hello - My understanding is that CoPs have a better likelihood of success if they are facilitated by a professional facilitator, and that without a facilitator, it is unlikely a CoP will maintain momentum. Is there any literature on this, or is it simply the common wisdom? Can someone point me to any studies that have been done, showing the effect of facilitation on a group's success?

          Rachel Weite

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Shawn Callahan
          Hi Jacques, Telling stories (sharing our experiences) helps to share tacit knowledge because embedded in stories are emotions, values and meaning that are more
          Message 4 of 8 , Oct 24, 2006
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            Hi Jacques,

            Telling stories (sharing our experiences) helps to share tacit knowledge
            because embedded in stories are emotions, values and meaning that are more
            that the words. On top of that, the stories people choose to tell and retell
            help everyone understand what's important around here. I would also say that
            stories are rarely black and white and can be interpreted in many ways. So
            the tacit knowledge transfer occurs in the interpretation of the stories.
            Stories provide room for it.

            I think it is also worth pointing out the difference between storytelling
            and what I call story-listening. Storytelling is a discipline of honing the
            way stories are told. Steve Denning's work is an excellent example of this
            approach. Story-listening is like ethnography where the organisation
            collects and makes sense of its own stories in their raw format. We record
            the stories verbatim as they are told in an organisation (we've just
            released an eBook describing our approach at
            http://www.anecdote.com.au/AnecdoteCircles). In practice I find it best to
            avoid the term 'story' when collecting narratives because people sometimes
            believe they have to make them up or create a grand masterpiece.
            Story-listening is about experiences, illustrations of how things are done
            and simply answering questions like, "so, what happened?"

            Cheers

            Shawn

            Download <http://www.anecdote.com.au/AnecdoteCircles> the Ultimate Guide to
            Anecdote Circles
            Anecdote Pty Ltd
            Shawn Callahan
            Founding Director
            shawn@...
            tel: +61 3 8300 0747
            fax: +61 3 9383 6274
            mobile: +61 410 346 343
            www.anecdote.com.au
            Skype ID:unorder



            _____

            From: Jacques Perrin [mailto:perrin_jacques@...]
            Sent: Tuesday, 24 October 2006 4:35 PM
            To: com-prac@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [cp] question



            Hi everyone,

            I have heard that storytelling is probably the best
            way to share tacit knowledge.

            Can anyone explain why and how this works?

            Sincerely,

            Jacques

            __________________________________________________
            Do You Yahoo!?
            Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
            http://mail. <http://mail.yahoo.com> yahoo.com






            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Cornejo Castro, Miguel
            Hi Matthew, completely agree with your anecdotal evidence. Good facilitators are that special kind of people who also have some knowledge of the field and
            Message 5 of 8 , Oct 31, 2006
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              Hi Matthew,

              completely agree with your anecdotal evidence. "Good" facilitators are "that special kind of people" who also have some knowledge of the field and a passion for the shared project. "Best" facilitators just add some specific skills.

              The problem is, who builds their skills. That is the kind of assistance that can only come from an expert, willing to dedicate time. That kind of work usually means a paid professional, or a very scarce type of volunteer.

              In a large CoP system (say Macuarium) one of the most important tasks of experienced facilitators is sharing criteria and tips with newcomers. There's 43 facilitators now, and we bring new ones to speed in a couple of weeks. But having that coaching and rulebook and question-and-answer capabilities has an enormous effect on efficiency and even on workload management.

              That said, common sense and some good reading are indeed quite enough to facilitate a small CoP :-D, and experience comes through doing... The chance of success may be lower, and the going harder, but that does not mean it's impossible at all. There's new CoPs forming that way every day.

              Best regards,

              Miguel



              -----Mensaje original-----
              De: com-prac@yahoogroups.com en nombre de Matthew Moore
              Enviado el: Mar 24/10/2006 11:51
              Para: com-prac@yahoogroups.com
              Asunto: RE: [cp] Literature on Facilitation

              Core team members of a community benefit from facilitation skills. In most organisations it is unrealistic to expect them to be professional facilitators.
              So you might build up their skills in this area through training, mentoring, reflective learning, etc.

              However, their passion and the professional respect of their peers are both more important than facilitation skills per se. N.B. I only have anecdote to support this so if you have had different experiences, I'd like to hear about them.


              -----Original Message-----
              From: com-prac@yahoogroups.com [mailto:com-prac@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Cornejo Castro, Miguel
              Sent: Tuesday, 24 October 2006 6:12 PM
              To: com-prac@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: RE: [cp] Literature on Facilitation


              Hello Rachel,

              for what good it may be :-), my experience is that starting a CoP is usually much easier with help from a professional (or at least an expert) but that a CoP is not really under way until most facilitators are members (volunteers).

              A professional facilitator is not (usually) really a "part" of the community as a group. It's a great support resource, especially at the design and startup phases, but it's not enough. Communities that stay on "life support" for too long, unable to generate people with the interest, drive and character to take up the facilitation role, will hardly produce the rest of CoP success signs (collaborative projects, active doubt resolution, content and references (knowledge objects)). There comes a time when it's either fly or flop.

              Best regards,

              Miguel

              -----Mensaje original-----
              De: com-prac@yahoogroups.com en nombre de Rachel Weite
              Enviado el: Lun 23/10/2006 21:11
              Para: com-prac@yahoogroups.com
              Asunto: [cp] Literature on Facilitation

              Hello - My understanding is that CoPs have a better likelihood of success if they are facilitated by a professional facilitator, and that without a facilitator, it is unlikely a CoP will maintain momentum. Is there any literature on this, or is it simply the common wisdom? Can someone point me to any studies that have been done, showing the effect of facilitation on a group's success?

              Rachel Weite

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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