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CoP Success Stories

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  • Fred Nickols
    I m looking for CoP success stories. Anyone know of any sources other than those written about by Wenger, St Onge, etc? Regards, Fred Nickols www.nickols.us
    Message 1 of 19 , Jun 9, 2006
      I'm looking for CoP success stories. Anyone know of any sources other
      than those written about by Wenger, St Onge, etc?

      Regards,

      Fred Nickols
      www.nickols.us
      nickols@...
    • Seth
      The Ayuda Urbana project. The project manager, Roberto Chavez, is a colleague of mine still at the World Bank A group of ten cities participated in the
      Message 2 of 19 , Jun 9, 2006
        The Ayuda Urbana project. The project manager, Roberto Chavez, is a
        colleague of mine still at the World Bank A group of ten cities
        participated in the initiative: Guatemala City, Havana, Managua, Mexico
        City, Panama City, San Jose, San Juan, San Salvador, Santo Domingo, and
        Tegucigalpa. The people involved in the project include the mayors and
        their staff in each of the ten cities, in particular specialists in
        various areas of urban development and management.

        A great write up can be found here:
        <http://www.etw.org/2003/case_studies/work_Ayunda_Urbana.htm>
        http://www.etw.org/2003/case_studies/work_Ayunda_Urbana.htm
        The website of the project (en Espanol): <http://www.ayudaurbana.com/>
        http://www.ayudaurbana.com/

        Roberto is cc'ed on this email.

        warmly,
        Seth

        Seth Kahan
        Accelerating Positive Change
        (301) 229-2221
        Collaboration Specialist
        Conference Keynote Speaker
        Executive Strategy Consultant

        Visit <http://www.sethkahan.com/> www.sethkahan.com to learn more.

        Visit my blog: collaboratioNation.com <http://collaborationation.com/>

        -----Original Message-----
        From: com-prac@yahoogroups.com [mailto:com-prac@yahoogroups.com] On
        Behalf Of Fred Nickols
        Sent: Friday, June 09, 2006 4:19 PM
        To: com-prac@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [cp] CoP Success Stories



        I'm looking for CoP success stories. Anyone know of any sources other
        than those written about by Wenger, St Onge, etc?

        Regards,

        Fred Nickols
        www.nickols.us
        nickols@att. <mailto:nickols%40att.net> net







        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Nick_Milton
        ... other ... There is the Shell book of stories at http://www.providersedge.com/docs/km_articles/Managing_K_Thru_Ways_of_W orking_Within_Shell.pdf, and there
        Message 3 of 19 , Jun 10, 2006
          --- In com-prac@yahoogroups.com, "Fred Nickols" <nickols@...> wrote:
          >
          > I'm looking for CoP success stories. Anyone know of any sources
          other
          > than those written about by Wenger, St Onge, etc?

          There is the Shell book of stories at
          http://www.providersedge.com/docs/km_articles/Managing_K_Thru_Ways_of_W
          orking_Within_Shell.pdf, and there are examples of monetary savings in
          the chapter on the BP Well Engineering community in
          http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0750675829

          Nick
        • Matthew Moore
          Fred, Knowledge Networks is a whole book full of case studies - which you d hope would have been reasonably successful to get written up.
          Message 4 of 19 , Jun 10, 2006
            Fred,

            Knowledge Networks is a whole book full of case studies - which you'd hope would have been reasonably successful to get written up.
            http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1591402700/002-8767290-2525669

            Also "Real-Life KM" kicks off with a whole bunch of CoP case studies: http://www.knowledgeboard.com/lib/3236

            When you say you are after "success stories" - what do you mean by successful?

            What is the definition of a "successful" community?

            Some possible options might include:
            - Participants feel & act engaged (e.g. participate a lot)
            - Sponsors feel they are getting a return on their investment ($ or not)
            - Meets pre-agreed business goals
            - Practices & processes are emulated by other groups

            Can an outside (who is not a sponsor or provider of resources) look at a community & say whether it is successful or not in any meaningful way?

            Matt


            -----Original Message-----
            From: com-prac@yahoogroups.com [mailto:com-prac@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Nick_Milton
            Sent: Saturday, 10 June 2006 9:06 PM
            To: com-prac@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [cp] Re: CoP Success Stories


            --- In com-prac@yahoogroups.com, "Fred Nickols" <nickols@...> wrote:
            >
            > I'm looking for CoP success stories. Anyone know of any sources
            other
            > than those written about by Wenger, St Onge, etc?

            There is the Shell book of stories at
            http://www.providersedge.com/docs/km_articles/Managing_K_Thru_Ways_of_W
            orking_Within_Shell.pdf, and there are examples of monetary savings in
            the chapter on the BP Well Engineering community in
            http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0750675829

            Nick






            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Bill Williams
            Fred, as Matt observed, your question is a very broad one (intentionally I assume). ... These options would certainly be helpful with business and
            Message 5 of 19 , Jun 11, 2006
              Fred, as Matt observed, your question is a very broad one (intentionally
              I assume).

              >What is the definition of a "successful" community?
              >Some possible options might include:
              >- Participants feel & act engaged (e.g. participate a lot)
              >- Sponsors feel they are getting a return on their investment ($ or not)
              >- Meets pre-agreed business goals
              >- Practices & processes are emulated by other groups

              These options would certainly be helpful with business and
              organizational type CoPs but would not apply in all contexts.

              Putting aside for a moment the question of whether Com-prac should be
              considered a CoP, I would like to take a different example: an online
              Usenet music community I have been involved with for a number of
              years. Of the four criteria above only the first would apply but I have
              always looked on the group as an example of a successful CoP (albeit
              without ever defining the terms very clearly).

              The characteristics of this group/community are:

              * it has been functioning autonomously online for about 10 years
              (without any kind of institutional or business connection)
              * some of the early participants are still active and there has been a
              core of most active participants which has remained fairly steady in
              size but altered gradually over the years as individuals migrate in and out.
              * it is open to all (no enrollment or formal moderation which makes it a
              little different to a mailing list) and has a high daily level of
              participation (10 - 20 topics discussed per day, generating 30 - 50
              posts daily average)
              * there is a clear domain, playing and studying jazz, and it has
              generated (some) shared artifacts and tacit practices
              * it has a very broad base of participants ranging from leading
              international performers, through teachers, hobbyists and college
              students to teenagers, retired readopters and the occasional instrument
              manufacturer or retailer spread through 4 continents (although mainly
              concentrated in the US)
              * it exhibits pretty much the entire range of participant roles
              mentioned by Wenger, in a fairly consistent fashion
              * although activities are predominantly online (posting messages,
              sharing and comenting each others audio and video recordings,
              collaborative online recording) there are very occasional offline
              encounters
              arranged at music fairs, workshops and concerts.

              Most participants in this community would probably not tend to be aware
              of the term CoP and I guess my own question is: would this community
              qualify as a successful CoP?

              Bill Williams
            • Fred Nickols
              Bill Williams describes a jazz-oriented usenet and closes with this ... A few comments in response... First, CoPs existed long before the term was coined so my
              Message 6 of 19 , Jun 12, 2006
                Bill Williams describes a jazz-oriented usenet and closes with this
                comment/question:

                > Most participants in this community would probably not
                > tend to be aware of the term CoP and I guess my own
                > question is: would this community qualify as a successful
                > CoP?

                A few comments in response...

                First, CoPs existed long before the term was coined so my position is
                that a CoP can exist without its members identifying it as such.

                Second, what you describe sounds very much like a community of
                practice, albeit not one that is wrapped around a work process inside
                an organization. However, CoPs existed outside organizations before
                they existed inside them.

                Third, its longevity would suggest that the community is indeed
                successful in meeting its members' needs and that makes it a success.

                In short, my answer is "Yes."

                Regards,

                Fred Nickols
                Senior Consultant
                Distance Consulting
                nickols@...
                www.nickols.us

                "Assistance At A Distance"
              • Fred Nickols
                Having just re-read my response to Bill Williams, and mindful of his earlier comment about the general nature of my inquiry about CoP success stories, I am
                Message 7 of 19 , Jun 12, 2006
                  Having just re-read my response to Bill Williams, and mindful of his
                  earlier comment about the general nature of my inquiry about CoP success
                  stories, I am compelled to add a comment...

                  > Bill Williams describes a jazz-oriented usenet and closes with this
                  > comment/question:
                  >
                  > > Most participants in this community would probably not
                  > > tend to be aware of the term CoP and I guess my own
                  > > question is: would this community qualify as a successful
                  > > CoP?

                  To which I replied (at long last):

                  > In short, my answer is "Yes."

                  I am back, then, to the definition of "success."

                  My initial inquiry had to do with success stories that could be used to
                  "sell" the notion of CoPs internally in organizations where CoPs had not
                  received much attention.

                  I was well aware of the distinction between success as measured by CoP
                  members and success as measured by organizations seeking a return for
                  investments made in seeding, nurturing and otherwise supporting CoPs.

                  My specific interest has to do with success stories related to market
                  research units but I'll come to that in a separate post.

                  It seems to me that a heavy-handed approach won't work with CoPs. There
                  is no surer way to kill them. Further, if there is a real need for a
                  CoP (from potential or prospective members' perspectives), it doesn't
                  seem to me that supporting them requires much in the way of investment
                  on the part of the organization. (It goes without saying that if there
                  is no perceived need on the part of the prospective or potential members
                  that no amount of investment by the organization, however large, will
                  produce much in the way of a return.)

                  I am led, then, to conclude that it is the needs of prospective or
                  potential members that really determines the likelihood of a CoPs
                  success. Organizational benefits must therefore be properly viewed as
                  side-effects or concommitment benefits, not as primary payoffs.

                  Whatchall think about that one?

                  Regards,

                  Fred Nickols, FP
                  nickols@...


                  > Regards,
                  >
                  > Fred Nickols
                  > Senior Consultant
                  > Distance Consulting
                  > nickols@...
                  > www.nickols.us
                  >
                  > "Assistance At A Distance"
                  >
                • Roy Greenhalgh
                  Fred wrote /I am led, then, to conclude that it is the needs of prospective or potential members that really determines the likelihood of a CoPs success.
                  Message 8 of 19 , Jun 12, 2006
                    Fred wrote

                    /I am led, then, to conclude that it is the needs of prospective or
                    potential members that really determines the likelihood of a CoPs
                    success. Organizational benefits must therefore be properly viewed as
                    side-effects or concommitment benefits, not as primary payoffs.

                    Whatchall think about that one?/

                    Fred .. I have been one of those unrepentant Luddites who have considered that CoPs just emerge. The reasons for emergence vary widely, but underpinning each emergence is a need. Just as the needs vary, the form the CoP assumes varies as well. And as I have written in this list time and time again, it is my experience, in general, that selling .. even giving away, those things that folks don't want, won't make them pay for it. Consequently, when two or three are gathered together with a common need, they will adopt an attitude of vulnerability, and share what they have, and ask for what they don't.

                    ... amazingly, it all seems pretty simple when you have watched kids grow up.

                    Roy Greenhalgh


                    >
                    >
                  • naavale
                    I think there are 3 key stakeholders in CoPs and that success is overlapping but different for each of them: community members, community sponsors and
                    Message 9 of 19 , Jun 13, 2006
                      I think there are 3 key stakeholders in CoPs and that success is
                      overlapping but different for each of them: community members,
                      community sponsors and community coordinators. Its easy to see how
                      sponsors and members might have different perspectives and each must
                      have their notions of success met or else the community will not
                      thrive. But its the coordinator who needs to bridge those needs and
                      bring their own deep perspective and experience and values and goals
                      as practioner to the work. And help the others to understand each
                      others perspectives (and to negotiate) about what constitutes
                      success.

                      Naava


                      --- In com-prac@yahoogroups.com, Roy Greenhalgh <rgreenh@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Fred wrote
                      >
                      > /I am led, then, to conclude that it is the needs of prospective or
                      > potential members that really determines the likelihood of a CoPs
                      > success. Organizational benefits must therefore be properly
                      viewed as
                      > side-effects or concommitment benefits, not as primary payoffs.
                      >
                      > Whatchall think about that one?/
                      >
                      > Fred .. I have been one of those unrepentant Luddites who have
                      considered that CoPs just emerge. The reasons for emergence vary
                      widely, but underpinning each emergence is a need. Just as the
                      needs vary, the form the CoP assumes varies as well. And as I have
                      written in this list time and time again, it is my experience, in
                      general, that selling .. even giving away, those things that folks
                      don't want, won't make them pay for it. Consequently, when two or
                      three are gathered together with a common need, they will adopt an
                      attitude of vulnerability, and share what they have, and ask for
                      what they don't.
                      >
                      > ... amazingly, it all seems pretty simple when you have watched
                      kids grow up.
                      >
                      > Roy Greenhalgh
                      >
                      >
                      > >
                      > >
                      >
                    • Fred Nickols
                      ... considered that CoPs just emerge. Yeah, I m one of em, too, although I do believe CoPs can be seeded and cultured (or, as Wenger et al say,
                      Message 10 of 19 , Jun 13, 2006
                        Roy Greenhalgh writes in part:


                        > Fred .. I have been one of those unrepentant Luddites who have
                        considered that CoPs just emerge.

                        Yeah, I'm one of 'em, too, although I do believe CoPs can be "seeded"
                        and "cultured" (or, as Wenger et al say, "cultivated"). It's for sure
                        they can't be mandated and heavy-handed attempts to establish or
                        control them are bound to fail.

                        Regards,

                        Fred Nickols
                        www.nickols.us
                        nickols@...
                      • Roy Greenhalgh
                        Naarva Can you explain somewhat more fully exactly what you believe a CoP co-ordinator does. For my part I simply have no idea of what intermediary role anyone
                        Message 11 of 19 , Jun 13, 2006
                          Naarva

                          Can you explain somewhat more fully exactly what you believe a CoP
                          co-ordinator does.

                          For my part I simply have no idea of what intermediary role anyone could
                          have in a CoP where the key activity is either F2F or a pseudo F2F as
                          one experiences in writing notes to each other via the web.

                          regards..

                          Roy Greenhalgh

                          naavale wrote:

                          >I think there are 3 key stakeholders in CoPs and that success is
                          >overlapping but different for each of them: community members,
                          >community sponsors and community coordinators. Its easy to see how
                          >sponsors and members might have different perspectives and each must
                          >have their notions of success met or else the community will not
                          >thrive. But its the coordinator who needs to bridge those needs and
                          >bring their own deep perspective and experience and values and goals
                          >as practioner to the work. And help the others to understand each
                          >others perspectives (and to negotiate) about what constitutes
                          >success.
                          >
                          >Naava
                          >
                          >
                          >--- In com-prac@yahoogroups.com, Roy Greenhalgh <rgreenh@...> wrote:
                          >
                          >
                          >>Fred wrote
                          >>
                          >>/I am led, then, to conclude that it is the needs of prospective or
                          >>potential members that really determines the likelihood of a CoPs
                          >>success. Organizational benefits must therefore be properly
                          >>
                          >>
                          >viewed as
                          >
                          >
                          >>side-effects or concommitment benefits, not as primary payoffs.
                          >>
                          >>Whatchall think about that one?/
                          >>
                          >>Fred .. I have been one of those unrepentant Luddites who have
                          >>
                          >>
                          >considered that CoPs just emerge. The reasons for emergence vary
                          >widely, but underpinning each emergence is a need. Just as the
                          >needs vary, the form the CoP assumes varies as well. And as I have
                          >written in this list time and time again, it is my experience, in
                          >general, that selling .. even giving away, those things that folks
                          >don't want, won't make them pay for it. Consequently, when two or
                          >three are gathered together with a common need, they will adopt an
                          >attitude of vulnerability, and share what they have, and ask for
                          >what they don't.
                          >
                          >
                          >>... amazingly, it all seems pretty simple when you have watched
                          >>
                          >>
                          >kids grow up.
                          >
                          >
                          >>Roy Greenhalgh
                          >>
                          >>
                          >>
                          >>
                          >>>
                          >>>
                          >>>
                          >>>
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >*-- The email forum on communities of practice --*
                          >Yahoo! Groups Links
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                        • Fred Nickols
                          ... I think your stakeholder view applies to sponsored CoPs (and whether they originally emerged on their own or were seeded and cultivated makes little
                          Message 12 of 19 , Jun 13, 2006
                            Naava writes:

                            > I think there are 3 key stakeholders in CoPs and that success is
                            > overlapping but different for each of them: community members,
                            > community sponsors and community coordinators. Its easy to see how
                            > sponsors and members might have different perspectives and each must
                            > have their notions of success met or else the community will not
                            > thrive. But its the coordinator who needs to bridge those needs and
                            > bring their own deep perspective and experience and values and goals
                            > as practioner to the work. And help the others to understand each
                            > others perspectives (and to negotiate) about what constitutes
                            > success.

                            I think your stakeholder view applies to sponsored CoPs (and whether
                            they originally emerged on their own or were seeded and cultivated
                            makes little difference once a sponsor enters the scene). By
                            "sponsored" I mean organizationally supported. So sponsors, members
                            and coordinators (or what some call "facilitators") would indeed be
                            "stakeholders" in sponsored CoPs and the definition of success would
                            need to be "negotiated" among the three. That said, I suspect that
                            sponsors' would be first among equal, members next and coordinators last.

                            Regards,

                            Fred Nickols
                            www.nickols.us
                            nickols@...
                          • Pete Bond
                            Fred , Roy, I must be one of these too. I agree with Fred that they can be seeded but then there s no gurantee that what emerges is what is envisaged by the
                            Message 13 of 19 , Jun 14, 2006
                              Fred , Roy, I must be one of these too. I agree with Fred that they can be
                              seeded but then there's no gurantee that what emerges is what is envisaged
                              by the seeder (no guarantee that a successful attempt to cultivate a CoP
                              will lead to the success of the 'host-sponsor').

                              Roy Greenhalgh writes in part:

                              > Fred .. I have been one of those unrepentant Luddites who have
                              considered that CoPs just emerge.

                              Yeah, I'm one of 'em, too, although I do believe CoPs can be "seeded"
                              and "cultured" (or, as Wenger et al say, "cultivated"). It's for sure
                              they can't be mandated and heavy-handed attempts to establish or
                              control them are bound to fail.

                              --
                              peter







                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • naavale
                              Roy, You asked me my favorite question :) . I am going to take some time to compose something and get back to you shortly. In the meantime I would love to hear
                              Message 14 of 19 , Jun 15, 2006
                                Roy,

                                You asked me my favorite question :) .

                                I am going to take some time to compose something and get back to
                                you shortly. In the meantime I would love to hear from others doing
                                this role.

                                Naava

                                --- In com-prac@yahoogroups.com, Roy Greenhalgh <rgreenh@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Naarva
                                >
                                > Can you explain somewhat more fully exactly what you believe a CoP
                                > co-ordinator does.
                                >
                                > For my part I simply have no idea of what intermediary role anyone
                                could
                                > have in a CoP where the key activity is either F2F or a pseudo F2F
                                as
                                > one experiences in writing notes to each other via the web.
                                >
                                > regards..
                                >
                                > Roy Greenhalgh
                                >
                                > naavale wrote:
                                >
                                > >I think there are 3 key stakeholders in CoPs and that success is
                                > >overlapping but different for each of them: community members,
                                > >community sponsors and community coordinators. Its easy to see
                                how
                                > >sponsors and members might have different perspectives and each
                                must
                                > >have their notions of success met or else the community will not
                                > >thrive. But its the coordinator who needs to bridge those needs
                                and
                                > >bring their own deep perspective and experience and values and
                                goals
                                > >as practioner to the work. And help the others to understand each
                                > >others perspectives (and to negotiate) about what constitutes
                                > >success.
                                > >
                                > >Naava
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >--- In com-prac@yahoogroups.com, Roy Greenhalgh <rgreenh@> wrote:
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >>Fred wrote
                                > >>
                                > >>/I am led, then, to conclude that it is the needs of prospective
                                or
                                > >>potential members that really determines the likelihood of a CoPs
                                > >>success. Organizational benefits must therefore be properly
                                > >>
                                > >>
                                > >viewed as
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >>side-effects or concommitment benefits, not as primary payoffs.
                                > >>
                                > >>Whatchall think about that one?/
                                > >>
                                > >>Fred .. I have been one of those unrepentant Luddites who have
                                > >>
                                > >>
                                > >considered that CoPs just emerge. The reasons for emergence vary
                                > >widely, but underpinning each emergence is a need. Just as the
                                > >needs vary, the form the CoP assumes varies as well. And as I
                                have
                                > >written in this list time and time again, it is my experience, in
                                > >general, that selling .. even giving away, those things that
                                folks
                                > >don't want, won't make them pay for it. Consequently, when two
                                or
                                > >three are gathered together with a common need, they will adopt
                                an
                                > >attitude of vulnerability, and share what they have, and ask for
                                > >what they don't.
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >>... amazingly, it all seems pretty simple when you have watched
                                > >>
                                > >>
                                > >kids grow up.
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >>Roy Greenhalgh
                                > >>
                                > >>
                                > >>
                                > >>
                                > >>>
                                > >>>
                                > >>>
                                > >>>
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >*-- The email forum on communities of practice --*
                                > >Yahoo! Groups Links
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                >
                              • Macuarium
                                Completely agree with Naava. Community sponsors can be a very wide variety of people or entities putting up the resources for the CoP, be they mailing lists
                                Message 15 of 19 , Jun 20, 2006
                                  Completely agree with Naava.

                                  "Community sponsors" can be a very wide variety of people or entities
                                  putting up the resources for the CoP, be they mailing lists or meeting
                                  rooms. In com-prac's instance, that means Yahoo.

                                  So the "sponsored" qualification need not apply: I can't think of any
                                  example CoP without those three types of stakeholder.

                                  And the alignment issue is true as well.

                                  Best regards,

                                  Miguel

                                  --- In com-prac@yahoogroups.com, "Fred Nickols" <nickols@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Naava writes:
                                  >
                                  > > I think there are 3 key stakeholders in CoPs and that success is
                                  > > overlapping but different for each of them: community members,
                                  > > community sponsors and community coordinators. Its easy to see how
                                  > > sponsors and members might have different perspectives and each must
                                  > > have their notions of success met or else the community will not
                                  > > thrive. But its the coordinator who needs to bridge those needs and
                                  > > bring their own deep perspective and experience and values and goals
                                  > > as practioner to the work. And help the others to understand each
                                  > > others perspectives (and to negotiate) about what constitutes
                                  > > success.
                                  >
                                  > I think your stakeholder view applies to sponsored CoPs (and whether
                                  > they originally emerged on their own or were seeded and cultivated
                                  > makes little difference once a sponsor enters the scene). By
                                  > "sponsored" I mean organizationally supported. So sponsors, members
                                  > and coordinators (or what some call "facilitators") would indeed be
                                  > "stakeholders" in sponsored CoPs and the definition of success would
                                  > need to be "negotiated" among the three. That said, I suspect that
                                  > sponsors' would be first among equal, members next and coordinators
                                  last.
                                  >
                                  > Regards,
                                  >
                                  > Fred Nickols
                                  > www.nickols.us
                                  > nickols@...
                                  >
                                • Fred Nickols
                                  Anyone know where I might find a collection of CoP sucess stories? Fred Nickols fred@nickols.us
                                  Message 16 of 19 , Jan 26, 2013
                                    Anyone know where I might find a collection of CoP sucess stories?

                                    Fred Nickols
                                    fred@...
                                  • dougkalish20009
                                    APQC has done three or four best practice studies for communities of practice...would suggest searching their site for the latest report.
                                    Message 17 of 19 , Jan 27, 2013
                                      APQC has done three or four best practice studies for communities of practice...would suggest searching their site for the latest report.

                                      --- In com-prac@yahoogroups.com, "Fred Nickols" wrote:
                                      >
                                      > Anyone know where I might find a collection of CoP sucess stories?
                                      >
                                      > Fred Nickols
                                      > fred@...
                                      >
                                    • Fred Nickols
                                      Thanks, Doug, but those appear to be expensive and so far as I can tell APQC doesn t have an inexpensive individual membership. Fred Nickols
                                      Message 18 of 19 , Mar 22, 2013
                                        Thanks, Doug, but those appear to be expensive and so far as I can tell APQC doesn't have an inexpensive individual membership.

                                        Fred Nickols

                                        --- In com-prac@yahoogroups.com, "dougkalish20009" <dkalish@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > APQC has done three or four best practice studies for communities of practice...would suggest searching their site for the latest report.
                                        >
                                        > --- In com-prac@yahoogroups.com, "Fred Nickols" wrote:
                                        > >
                                        > > Anyone know where I might find a collection of CoP sucess stories?
                                        > >
                                        > > Fred Nickols
                                        > > fred@
                                        > >
                                        >
                                      • Lotte
                                        ... I like to go to this site...maybe you read German? It is no 100% CoP, but it is filled every year with new cases from companies using Entreprise 2.0
                                        Message 19 of 19 , Mar 22, 2013
                                          --- In com-prac@yahoogroups.com, "Fred Nickols" <fred@...> wrote:
                                          >
                                          > Anyone know where I might find a collection of CoP sucess stories?
                                          >
                                          > Fred Nickols
                                          > fred@...
                                          >

                                          I like to go to this site...maybe you read German?
                                          It is no 100% CoP, but it is filled every year with new cases from companies using Entreprise 2.0 systems, the stories are carefully written and categorized, the site is maintained by a university..

                                          http://www.e20cases.org/
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